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we are writing an application accessing a database of an erp-solution. Of course we are not allowed to write into the database (database = readonly).

This leads to a conflict when writing tests for our daos that access/read the database.

What are best practices to generate testdata?

Any suggestions would be appriciate, thanks in advance Tobi

Update: Maybe important, we don't map all the properties of the tables in the erp's database because we won't need them. Some of the not mapped columns are not null.

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If your test touches the DB, it is probably useful but it is not a unit test. – Johnsyweb Jun 12 '12 at 8:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use a non production database. If possible use an in-memory database, use something like DB Unit to create the schema and standing data and let the instance tear itself down when the test pack is complete.

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Not exactly what I was looking for but I will mark this as answer. – Tobias Jun 29 '12 at 6:22

In the past I have used NUnit tests all within a transaction and then rollback after the test is complete. begin tran insert .... select .... check unit test ... rollback tran. Is this an option for you?

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thanks for the sugestion. Unfortunatly this does not solve our issue. The database is completly readonly. So we dont want to write in this database at all. – Tobias Jun 12 '12 at 8:27

You should create two databases, one with your live data and one with testdata. Then you can test excactly for this test data and you can also test the readonly features by probing to write to the database. if this fails you are successfull.

you always should have a testing and a productive system for security reasons. What if the write test fails and all your productive data is lost? As Jeff Watkins told before, you can use a in Memory DB, which is filled dynamicly with testdata, then set to readonly and then get tested. The easiest way is still to have just another dataset as normal DB (but i dont know what you are using, so you have to figure out yourself what best fits your purposes).

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