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I am learning WPF and MVVM at the moment (or at least I am trying to...).

I created a little sample-app, that shows a Window with 2 buttons, each of it should show a new View on Click. So I created 3 UserControls (DecisonMaker with the 2 Buttons, and one Usercontrol for each "clicktarget").

So I bound the CotentControl of the MainWindow to a property called "CurrentView" in my MainWindowViewModel

Code of MainWindow.xaml:

<Window x:Class="WpfTestApplication.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfTestApplication"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
<Window.DataContext>
    <local:MainWindowViewModel />
</Window.DataContext>
<Grid>
    <ContentControl Content="{Binding CurrentView, Mode=OneWay}" />
</Grid>
</Window>

Code of MainWindowViewModel:

class MainWindowViewModel
{      
    private UserControl _currentView = new DecisionMaker();
    public UserControl CurrentView
    {
        get { return _currentView; }
        set { _currentView = value; }
    }

    public ICommand MausCommand
    {
        get { return new RelayCommand(LoadMouseView); }
    }

    public ICommand TouchCommand
    {
        get { return new RelayCommand(LoadTouchView); }
    }

    private void LoadMouseView()
    {
        CurrentView = new UserControlMouse();
    }

    private void LoadTouchView()
    {
        CurrentView = new UserControlTouch();
    }
}

The initial UserControl (DecisionMaker) shows up as supposed. Also the method LoadMouseView is called. But the View doesn't change. What am I missing?

UPDATE: Thanks so much! I missed the INotifyPropertyChanged-interface. All of your answers were just great and very accurate and helpful! I don't know which one to accept - I think it's the most fair way to accept the "first" answer?

I accepted blindmeis answer, as it solved the problem and helped me understand MVVM better. But every answer was really great thanks to all of you!

share|improve this question
1  
Viewmodel should have no reference to a view/usercontrol. so you should remove this from your viewmodel. this is a good starting point: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx –  blindmeis Jun 12 '12 at 9:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

if you wanna do mvvm - then you should have no references to your view/usercontrols in your viewmodel. you have to implement INotifyPropertyChanged! ps: if you need System.Windows namespace in your Viewmodel - then something is wrong.

in your case what you need:

  • 1 mainviewmodel
  • 1 viewmodel for UserControlMouse
  • 1 viewmodel for UserControlTouch
  • 1 view/usercontrol for UserControlMouse
  • 1 view/usercontrol for UserControlTouch

your mainviewmodel should have at least 2commands to switch your view and 1 property for CurrentView. in your command you simply set your CurrentView to the right viewmodel instance. at least you need two datatemplates for each viewmodel which define the right view.

public object CurrentView
{
    get { return _currentView; }
    set {
        _currentView = value; this.RaiseNotifyPropertyChanged("CurrentView");}
}

xaml

<Window x:Class="WpfTestApplication.MainWindow"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfTestApplication"
Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
<Window.Resources>
 <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:MyMouseViewModel}">
   <local:MyMouseUserControlView/>
  </DataTemplate>
 <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:MyTouchViewModel}">
   <local:MyTouchUserControlView/>
  </DataTemplate>
</Window.Resources>
<Window.DataContext>
 <local:MainWindowViewModel />
</Window.DataContext>
<Grid>

 <!-- here your buttons with command binding, i'm too lazy to write this. -->

 <!-- you content control -->
 <ContentControl Content="{Binding CurrentView, Mode=OneWay}" />
</Grid>
</Window>
share|improve this answer
    
This is lots of help and infos for my learning-progress. I just started yesterday with WPF/MVVM so I already was rather happy to get the ICommand-Behaviour working ;) –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 9:22
    
If you want pure MVVM, then the view shouldn't have references to the view model either. Instantiate the view and view model in the application startup and bind the view model to the data context in your startup method. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jun 12 '12 at 9:27
    
+1 for "if you need System.Windows namespace in your Viewmodel - then something is wrong." I strongly agree with that; unfortunately, many MVVM articles and frameworks recommend to derive commands from ICommand which introduces an unnecessary dependency from WPF assemblies in the ViewModel. –  user128300 Jun 12 '12 at 10:36
    
@blindmeis: Just one more question -> do I really need 2 viewmodels here? I mean 2 Views - for sure. Shouldn't it be possible to use only one ViewModel? –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 13:04
    
its up to you you can do all in one viewmodel, but its much easier/loosly coupled to have one viewmodel for one view/usercontrol. just try it out and see the pro and contra. if you use datatemplate you need an object type. thats why i seperate my concerns in different viewmodels. –  blindmeis Jun 13 '12 at 6:05

I would do something like this to select the input style that you want, to MainWindow I've added a property that lets me select the mode of input.

public enum UserInterfaceModes
{
    Mouse,
    Touch,
}

public UserInterfaceModes UserInterfaceMode
{
   get { return (UserInterfaceModes)GetValue(UserInterfaceModeProperty); }
   set { SetValue(UserInterfaceModeProperty, value); }
}

public static readonly DependencyProperty UserInterfaceModeProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("UserInterfaceMode", typeof(UserInterfaceModes), typeof(MainWindow), new UIPropertyMetadata(UserInterfaceModes.Mouse));

then for the xaml view part you can select the correct template with a trigger.

<Style TargetType="{x:Type local:MainWindow}">
   <Style.Triggers>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding UserInterfaceMode}" Value="Mouse">
             <Setter Property="Template">
                  <Setter.Value>
                       <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:MainWindow}">
                            <Grid Background="Red"/>
                       </ControlTemplate>
                  </Setter.Value>
             </Setter>
        </DataTrigger>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding UserInterfaceMode}" Value="Touch">
             <Setter Property="Template">
                  <Setter.Value>
                       <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:MainWindow}">
                           <Grid Background="Blue"/>
                       </ControlTemplate>
                   </Setter.Value>
              </Setter>
         </DataTrigger>
    </Style.Triggers>
</Style>
share|improve this answer
    
Definitely a great answer, that will help me in the future! For this specific problem I am facing now for testing/learning, it's not 100% applicable as it will negate my whole button-layout ;) But in future 'real' implemenations, I will for sure come back for your code! –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 9:14
    
Aww, you'll make me blush! :D –  Andy Jun 12 '12 at 9:22

The viewmodel need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged. Otherwise the view won't be notified when a property changes in the viewmodel.

class MainWindowViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private UserControl _currentView = new DecisionMaker();

    public UserControl CurrentView
    {
        get { return _currentView; }
        set
        {
            _currentView = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("CurrentView");
        }
    } 

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I implemented this already (after your answer) and it works just fine. But why do I need it here and not for properties of type String? –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 9:12
1  
this works for your case, but its not mvvm –  blindmeis Jun 12 '12 at 9:19

You need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged on MainWindowViewModel, such that the view is informed when the CurrentView property is changed.

share|improve this answer

It sounds like the behaviour you want is pretty much what you get with a [TabControl][1] - why not use this built in control and just bind the DataContext of both tabs to the same view model.

This also has the advantage that your view model wouldn't know about the view classes (I am assuming that UserControlMouse etc are user controls).

Note: this will not be applicable if you need the view model to be aware of whether it is in touch or mouse mode.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's the overall-target here, to divide the UserControl in Mouse- and TouchMode. So once at starttime I will need to "know" the start-usercontrols. –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 9:11
    
@chiffre you should still not be referencing view components (user controls) in the view model if you want to do MVVM –  Steve Greatrex Jun 12 '12 at 9:19
    
I think I will follow blindmeis answer for future work on it. Thanks for your great help in this case! –  chiffre Jun 12 '12 at 9:21

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