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In Oracle I have:

SELECT t2.Regkood, t2.naitatel, t2.naitafaks, t3.lahtiolekuaeg, t1.*
FROM table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3
WHERE t1.client = t2.client AND t1.client = t3.client(+) AND t1.client = 414246

How do I get the same in SQL Server?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
:Use LEFT OUTER JOIN syntax –  Gaurav Soni Jun 12 '12 at 10:07
5  
You should not use (+) in Oracle. Use standard JOIN syntax. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 12 '12 at 10:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT t2.Regkood, 
       t2.naitatel, 
       t2.naitafaks, 
       t3.lahtiolekuaeg, 
       t1.* 
FROM   table1 t1 
       INNER JOIN table2 t2 
               ON t1.client = t2.client 
       LEFT JOIN table3 t3 
               ON t1.client = t3.client 
WHERE  t1.client = 414246 

Some samples to understand joins:

LEFT OUTER JOIN in ORACLE

SELECT *
FROM A, B
WHERE A.column = B.column(+)

RIGHT OUTER JOIN IN ORACLE

SELECT *
FROM A, B
WHERE B.column(+) = A.column
share|improve this answer
    
I think that should be a left join not a right join –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 12 '12 at 10:06
    
@Romil : Just out of interest can you please explain me what does + symbol stands for in Oracle ? –  praveen Jun 12 '12 at 10:08
    
In previous version of oracle (we use +) and sql server (we use *) to denote left or right join. –  Romil Jun 12 '12 at 10:10
1  
@user1444413 you can accept the answer by clicking on right symbol in front of my answer. –  Romil Jun 12 '12 at 10:51
1  
Your two Oracle joins are equivalent (A LEFT JOIN B). If instead you want to write A RIGHT JOIN B you would write something like this: SELECT * FROM A,B WHERE A.column (+) = B.column –  Vincent Malgrat Jun 12 '12 at 11:21

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