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I have a mix of C C++ code. All compiled with g++. Wherever I have C headers I have the contents of the header file included inside

#if defined(__cplusplus)
extern "C" {
#endif

and

#if defined(__cplusplus)
    extern "C" {
    #endif

But in one C header file I get g++ compilation errors where I have accidentally used a parameter name as template , which obviously is incorrect and in conflict with c++ keyword template.

I know I can go and change this parameter name, but I am thinking why is this extern "C" declaration not working and why is the header file considered as C++ code and not C as I intended to.

g++ version 4.1.1 Linux Red Hat Enterprise.

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3  
Uh, 4.1.1 is OLD. –  Griwes Jun 12 '12 at 10:35
1  
@Griwes - I know. But legacy code, legacy builds. Changes are slow! –  goldenmean Jun 12 '12 at 10:41
    
@Griwes, I still use 3.x sometimes :) –  Prof. Falken Dec 5 '12 at 20:59
    
@AmigableClarkKant, which doesn't change the fact that 4.1.1 is OLD. –  Griwes Dec 5 '12 at 22:27
    
@Griwes, haha, no. It's to do with age also I think. It feels like yesterday switching from 2.95 –  Prof. Falken Dec 6 '12 at 12:40
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The extern "C" only tells the compiler (actually, the linker) that C++ name mangling doesn't apply to the functions declared in that scope. It has nothing to do with the syntax or keywords themselves.

Your best solution is to rename the conflicting symbols.

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IS that so. I was thinking. extern "C" tells the linker that the following declarations are C code. Which even the C++ faq parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/mixing-c-and-cpp.html#faq-32.3 seemed to say. –  goldenmean Jun 12 '12 at 10:40
    
@goldenmean yes, and there's no contradiction here. It tells it they are C functions because C functions don't have C++ name mangling... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 12 '12 at 10:41
    
Luchian is correct. See also Raymond Chen. –  MSalters Jun 12 '12 at 10:42
    
@LuchianGrigore: Actually it tells the compiler, not linker. Name mangling is a job of compiler, not linker. –  Nawaz Jun 12 '12 at 10:42
1  
@LuchianGrigore: Yup. But that lookup has nothing to with extern "C". All that it needs the symbol and where to look for it. –  Nawaz Jun 12 '12 at 10:43
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Consider:

extern "C" {
  namespace n
  {
    int& foo(bool b)
    {
      if (!b)
        throw std::invalid_argument("fail!");
      static int i = 0;
      return ++i;
    }
  }
}

This function has C language linkage, but uses references, namespaces and exceptions, which I hope demonstrates that extern "C" doesn't magically switch the compiler to compiling C, it just tells the compiler to use C calling conventions and symbol-naming conventions for the functions and variables with C language linkage (which usually just means it disables name-mangling and causes matching declarations in different namespaces to refer to the same entity.)

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1  
Thanks Really. By giving a 'counter example' if I may call it so, i.e. C++ code syntax inside a extern C linkage, it clears my concept nicely. –  goldenmean Jun 20 '12 at 9:26
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