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Is there any way to do the opposite of :hover using only CSS? As in: if :hover is on Mouse Enter, is there a CSS equivalent to on Mouse Leave?

Example:

I have a HTML menu using list items. When I hover one of the items, there is a CSS color animation from #999 to black. How can I create the opposite effect when the mouse leaves the item area, with an animation from black to #999?

jsFiddle

(Have in mind that I do not wish to answer only this example, but the entire "opposite of :hover" issue.)

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What exactly are you trying to do? Maybe there is a different alternative? –  Moin Zaman Jun 12 '12 at 10:52
5  
The opposite of :hover is quite simply :not(:hover); however, :hover is not synonymous with onmouseenter nor is :not(:hover) the same as onmouseleave. CSS doesn't have any concept of DOM events. –  BoltClock Jun 12 '12 at 10:53
1  
@Cthulhu: :hover simply means "an element that has a mouse pointer over it". It doesn't indicate if the mouse pointer transitioned from another element to this element. It just means that the mouse pointer is currently on the element. –  BoltClock Jun 12 '12 at 10:55
1  
@BoltClock would :not(:hover) actually do anything be triggered at all? –  Moin Zaman Jun 12 '12 at 10:59
2  
@Moin Zaman: Yep. As long as your mouse isn't over a certain element, then :not(:hover) will apply. Here's a demo: jsfiddle.net/BoltClock/rghBX –  BoltClock Jun 12 '12 at 11:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly you could do the same thing by moving your transitions to the link rather than the hover state:

ul li a {
    color:#999;       
    transition: color 0.5s linear; /* vendorless fallback */
    -o-transition: color 0.5s linear; /* opera */
    -ms-transition: color 0.5s linear; /* IE 10 */
    -moz-transition: color 0.5s linear; /* Firefox */
    -webkit-transition: color 0.5s linear; /*safari and chrome */
}

ul li a:hover {
    color:black;
    cursor: pointer;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/spacebeers/sELKu/3/

The definition of hover is:

The :hover selector is used to select elements when you mouse over them.

By that definiation the opposite of hover is any point at which the mouse is not over it. Someone far smarter than me has done this article, setting different transitions on both states - http://css-tricks.com/different-transitions-for-hover-on-hover-off/

#thing {
   padding: 10px;
   border-radius: 5px;

  /* HOVER OFF */
   -webkit-transition: padding 2s;
}

#thing:hover {
   padding: 20px;
   border-radius: 15px;

  /* HOVER ON */
   -webkit-transition: border-radius 2s;
}
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"(Have in mind that I do not wish to answer only this example, but the entire "opposite of :hover" issue.)" –  Cthulhu Jun 12 '12 at 10:59
1  
@Cthulhu - I've edited my answer now. That might help a bit more. I thought that was too obvious an answer. –  SpaceBeers Jun 12 '12 at 11:07

No there is no explicit property for mouse leave in CSS.

You could use :hover on all the other elements except the item in question to achieve this effect. But Im not sure how practical that would be.

I think you have to look at a JS / jQuery solution.

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JS is not needed in this case, and I would now discourage it, though a justification of performance. –  Alex Chamberlain Jun 12 '12 at 10:57
    
It's not needed for the example above, but it appears to be the best solution for the whole "mouse leave" problem. –  Cthulhu Jun 12 '12 at 11:08

You don't need that. Just use CSS transitions instead of animation.

See JSfiddle demo with Transitions.

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Like I said on the example, my issue is not with the animation, but with the "on mouse leave" part. –  Cthulhu Jun 12 '12 at 10:53
1  
Transition works both on mouse over and mouse leave. It's enough to specify styles for normal state and :hover state. –  Marat Tanalin Jun 12 '12 at 10:54
    
@Cthulhu See JSfiddle demo I've added. –  Marat Tanalin Jun 12 '12 at 11:01
    
+1 @Cthulhu This one should be the correct answer. –  Jose Rui Santos Oct 18 '12 at 9:59

You have misunderstood :hover; it says the mouse is over an item, rather than the mouse has just entered the item.

You could add animation to the selector without :hover to achieve the effect you want.

Transitions is a better option: http://jsfiddle.net/Cvx96/

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