Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The jQuery docs at http://api.jquery.com/on/ mention the benefits of delegated-events using the following syntax (which attaches an event handler to only one element):

$('#mytable').on('click', 'tr.hoverable', function(){
    // blah
});

But I can't find any reference to proper syntax for attaching multiple events at once WITH delegated-events. Is there a shortcut for the following, but with tr.hoverable as a delegated event?

$('#mytable tr.hoverable').on({
    mouseenter: function(){
        // blah
    },
    mouseleave: function(){
        // blah
    },
    click: function(){
        // blah
    }
});

Or is this the only solution ...

$('#mytable').on('click', 'tr.hoverable', function(){
    // blah
}).on('mouseenter', 'tr.hoverable', function(){
    // blah
}).on('mouseleave', 'tr.hoverable', function(){
    // blah
});

?

share|improve this question
    
Look at the API again... the 2nd version of the method is the one you want. –  James Allardice Jun 12 '12 at 11:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted
$('#mytable').on({
    mouseenter: function(){
        // blah
    },
    mouseleave: function(){
        // blah
    },
    click: function(){
        // blah
    }
}, '.hoverable');

As per this signature:

.on( events-map [, selector] [, data] )

Also, prefer single tagName/className/id selectors for delegation as they get optimized

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's what I was looking for :) Could you clarify your prefer single tagName/... comment? I don't understand :) –  neokio Jun 12 '12 at 11:40
    
@neokio I am wrong in this case as quickParse still gives results for "tr.hoverable" though not for ".class1.class2". It's just a side tip. To explain how event delegation works is too much for one comment :P –  Esailija Jun 12 '12 at 11:44
    
This is an older question/answer, but since it helped me, i thought i'd offer some clarification of the last part of the answer: simpler delegated selectors (.hoverable) usually perform better than compound selectors (technically, td.hoverable). In the OP's case, the difference is minimal & probably necessary for specificity. Just be wary of complex (and/or non-CSS) stuff like div+table:has(td.hoverable)... as it requires jQuery to seek multiple times for matching elements. –  cautionbug Oct 8 '13 at 15:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.