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How can I remove some specific elements from a numpy array? Say I have

import numpy as np

a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])

I then want to remove 3,4,7 from a. All I know is the index of the values (index=[2,3,6]).

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up vote 91 down vote accepted

Use numpy.delete() - returns a new array with sub-arrays along an axis deleted

numpy.delete(a, index)

For your specific question:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
index = [2, 3, 6]

new_a = np.delete(a, index)

print(new_a) #Prints `[1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9]`

Note that numpy.delete() returns a new array since array scalars are immutable, similar to strings in Python, so each time a change is made to it, a new object is created. I.e., to quote the delete() docs:

"A copy of arr with the elements specified by obj removed. Note that delete does not occur in-place..."

If the code I post has output, it is the result of running the code.

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1  
Thank you very much. I tried that bur couldn't make it work for some reason. It does work now – Daniel Thaagaard Andreasen Jun 12 '12 at 12:05
    
@DanielThaagaardAndreasen Happy to have been able to help. – Levon Jun 12 '12 at 12:27
1  
This answer is misleading. The second argument to numpy.delete is not an index of the item you want to remove, but the actual item you want to remove. – Ingvi Gautsson Mar 19 at 23:31
    
This answer is so wrong the new_a = [1 2 3 6 7 9] – mel Jun 16 at 16:02
    
@mel If you look at the edit/revision history, you'll see that the values of the elements were changed just 3 days ago from the correct 2, 3, 6 values to the incorrect 3, 4, 7 values .. I will roll back/fix this. Clearly this happened after 88 people voted this answer up. Thanks for bringing this to my attention. – Levon Jun 16 at 20:30

A Numpy array is immutable, meaning you technically cannot delete an item from it. However, you can construct a new array without the values you don't want, like this:

b = np.delete(a, [2,3,6])
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Thank you for your answer. – Daniel Thaagaard Andreasen Jun 12 '12 at 12:06
    
+1 for mentioning 'immutable'. It is good to remember, that numpy arrays are not good for quick changes of size (appending/deleting elements) – eumiro Jun 12 '12 at 12:08
10  
technically, numpy arrays ARE mutable. For example, this: a[0]=1 modifies a in place. But they can not be resized. – btel Oct 23 '14 at 17:16

There is a numpy built-in function to help with that.

import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> b = np.array([3,4,7])
>>> c = np.setdiff1d(a,b)
>>> c
array([1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9])
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Good to know. I was thinking that np.delete would be slower but alas, timeit for 1000 integers says delete is x2 faster. – wbg Jun 9 at 21:52

Not being a numpy person, I took a shot with:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> import itertools
>>> 
>>> a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])
>>> index=[2,3,6]
>>> a = np.array(list(itertools.compress(a, [i not in index for i in range(len(a))])))
>>> a
array([1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9])

According to my tests, this outperforms numpy.delete(). I don't know why that would be the case, maybe due to the small size of the initial array?

python -m timeit -s "import numpy as np" -s "import itertools" -s "a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])" -s "index=[2,3,6]" "a = np.array(list(itertools.compress(a, [i not in index for i in range(len(a))])))"
100000 loops, best of 3: 12.9 usec per loop

python -m timeit -s "import numpy as np" -s "a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])" -s "index=[2,3,6]" "np.delete(a, index)"
10000 loops, best of 3: 108 usec per loop

That's a pretty significant difference (in the opposite direction to what I was expecting), anyone have any idea why this would be the case?

Even more weirdly, passing numpy.delete() a list performs worse than looping through the list and giving it single indices.

python -m timeit -s "import numpy as np" -s "a = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9])" -s "index=[2,3,6]" "for i in index:" "    np.delete(a, i)"
10000 loops, best of 3: 33.8 usec per loop

Edit: It does appear to be to do with the size of the array. With large arrays, numpy.delete() is significantly faster.

python -m timeit -s "import numpy as np" -s "import itertools" -s "a = np.array(list(range(10000)))" -s "index=[i for i in range(10000) if i % 2 == 0]" "a = np.array(list(itertools.compress(a, [i not in index for i in range(len(a))])))"
10 loops, best of 3: 200 msec per loop

python -m timeit -s "import numpy as np" -s "a = np.array(list(range(10000)))" -s "index=[i for i in range(10000) if i % 2 == 0]" "np.delete(a, index)"
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.68 msec per loop

Obviously, this is all pretty irrelevant, as you should always go for clarity and avoid reinventing the wheel, but I found it a little interesting, so I thought I'd leave it here.

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2  
Be careful with what you actually compare! You have a = delte_stuff(a) in your first iteration, which makes a smaller with every iteration. When you use the inbuild function, you don't store the value back to a, which keeps a in the original size! Besides that, you can speed up your function drastically, when you create a set ouf of index and check against that, whether or not to delete an item. Fixing both things, I get for 10k items: 6.22 msec per loop with your function, 4.48 msec for numpy.delete, which is roughly what you would expect. – Michael Jan 20 '13 at 5:30
2  
Two more hints: Instead of np.array(list(range(x))) use np.arange(x), and for creating the index, you can use np.s_[::2]. – Michael Jan 20 '13 at 5:41

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