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The compare function is a function that takes two arguments a and b and returns an integer describing their order. If a is smaller than b, the result is some negative integer. If a is bigger than b, the result is some positive integer. Otherwise, a and b are equal, and the result is zero.

This function is often used to parametrize sorting and searching algorithms from standard libraries.

Implementing the compare function for characters is quite easy; you simply subtract the arguments:

int compare_char(char a, char b)
{
    return a - b;
}

This works because the difference between two characters is generally assumed to fit into an integer. (Note that this assumption does not hold for systems where sizeof(char) == sizeof(int).)

This trick cannot work to compare integers, because the difference between two integers generally does not fit into an integer. For example, INT_MAX - (-1) = INT_MIN suggests that INT_MAX is smaller than -1 (technically, the overflow leads to undefined behavior, but let's assume modulo arithmetic).

So how can we implement the compare function efficiently for integers? Here is my first attempt:

int compare_int(int a, int b)
{
    int temp;
    int result;
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "cmp %3, %2 \n\t"
        "mov $0, %1 \n\t"

        "mov $1, %0 \n\t"
        "cmovg %0, %1 \n\t"

        "mov $-1, %0 \n\t"
        "cmovl %0, %1 \n\t"
    : "=r"(temp), "=r"(result)
    : "r"(a), "r"(b)
    : "cc");
    return result;
}

Can it be done in less than 6 instructions? Is there a less straightforward way that is more efficient?

share|improve this question
19  
Have you disassembled return (a<b)?-1:(a>b);? –  jxh Jun 12 '12 at 12:16
4  
@user315052 Only five instructions, nice! Now I feel stupid :) –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 12:19
12  
This is almost certainly pointless optimization. Any savings here is noise compared to the function call overhead and algorithmic costs in the caller. –  Raymond Chen Jun 12 '12 at 13:49
1  
@Raymond I'm doing this purely out of curiosity. Ain't assembly fun? ;) –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 14:46
5  
@KonradRudolph If this is inlined, then this is actually worse because the compiler cannot optimize inlined assembly. You're better off expressing it in C so the optimizer can optimize into the inline function. For example, your inline assembly prevents the compiler from optimizing if (compare_int(a,b) < 0) into if (a < b). –  Raymond Chen Jun 12 '12 at 16:10
show 15 more comments

7 Answers 7

up vote 39 down vote accepted

The following has always proven to be fairly efficient for me:

return (a < b) ? -1 : (a > b);

With gcc -O2 -S, this compiles down to the following five instructions:

xorl    %edx, %edx
cmpl    %esi, %edi
movl    $-1, %eax
setg    %dl
cmovge  %edx, %eax

As a follow-up to Ambroz Bizjak's excellent companion answer, I was not convinced that his program tested the same assembly code what was posted above. And, when I was studying the compiler output more closely, I noticed that the compiler was not generating the same instructions as was posted in either of our answers. So, I took his test program, hand modified the assembly output to match what we posted, and compared the resulting times. It seems the two versions compare roughly identically.

./opt_cmp_branchless: 0m1.070s
./opt_cmp_branch:     0m1.037s

I am posting the assembly of each program in full so that others may attempt the same experiment, and confirm or contradict my observation.

The following is the version with the cmovge instruction ((a < b) ? -1 : (a > b)):

        .file   "cmp.c"
        .text
        .section        .rodata.str1.1,"aMS",@progbits,1
.LC0:
        .string "%d=0\n"
        .text
        .p2align 4,,15
.globl main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB20:
        .cfi_startproc
        pushq   %rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        pushq   %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
        .cfi_offset 3, -24
        movl    $arr.2789, %ebx
        subq    $8, %rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 32
.L9:
        leaq    4(%rbx), %rbp
.L10:
        call    rand
        movb    %al, (%rbx)
        addq    $1, %rbx
        cmpq    %rbx, %rbp
        jne     .L10
        cmpq    $arr.2789+4096, %rbp
        jne     .L9
        xorl    %r8d, %r8d
        xorl    %esi, %esi
        orl     $-1, %edi
.L12:
        xorl    %ebp, %ebp
        .p2align 4,,10
        .p2align 3
.L18:
        movl    arr.2789(%rbp), %ecx
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        .p2align 4,,10
        .p2align 3
.L15:
        movl    arr.2789(%rax), %edx
        xorl    %ebx, %ebx
        cmpl    %ecx, %edx
        movl    $-1, %edx
        setg    %bl
        cmovge  %ebx, %edx
        addq    $4, %rax
        addl    %edx, %esi
        cmpq    $4096, %rax
        jne     .L15
        addq    $4, %rbp
        cmpq    $4096, %rbp
        jne     .L18
        addl    $1, %r8d
        cmpl    $500, %r8d
        jne     .L12
        movl    $.LC0, %edi
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        call    printf
        addq    $8, %rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        popq    %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        popq    %rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE20:
        .size   main, .-main
        .local  arr.2789
        .comm   arr.2789,4096,32
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

The version below uses the branchless method ((a > b) - (a < b)):

        .file   "cmp.c"
        .text
        .section        .rodata.str1.1,"aMS",@progbits,1
.LC0:
        .string "%d=0\n"
        .text
        .p2align 4,,15
.globl main
        .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB20:
        .cfi_startproc
        pushq   %rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        .cfi_offset 6, -16
        pushq   %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
        .cfi_offset 3, -24
        movl    $arr.2789, %ebx
        subq    $8, %rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 32
.L9:
        leaq    4(%rbx), %rbp
.L10:
        call    rand
        movb    %al, (%rbx)
        addq    $1, %rbx
        cmpq    %rbx, %rbp
        jne     .L10
        cmpq    $arr.2789+4096, %rbp
        jne     .L9
        xorl    %r8d, %r8d
        xorl    %esi, %esi
.L19:
        movl    %ebp, %ebx
        xorl    %edi, %edi
        .p2align 4,,10
        .p2align 3
.L24:
        movl    %ebp, %ecx
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        jmp     .L22
        .p2align 4,,10
        .p2align 3
.L20:
        movl    arr.2789(%rax), %ecx
.L22:
        xorl    %edx, %edx
        cmpl    %ebx, %ecx
        setg    %cl
        setl    %dl
        movzbl  %cl, %ecx
        subl    %ecx, %edx
        addl    %edx, %esi
        addq    $4, %rax
        cmpq    $4096, %rax
        jne     .L20
        addq    $4, %rdi
        cmpq    $4096, %rdi
        je      .L21
        movl    arr.2789(%rdi), %ebx
        jmp     .L24
.L21:
        addl    $1, %r8d
        cmpl    $500, %r8d
        jne     .L19
        movl    $.LC0, %edi
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        call    printf
        addq    $8, %rsp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 24
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        popq    %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        popq    %rbp
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
        ret
        .cfi_endproc
.LFE20:
        .size   main, .-main
        .local  arr.2789
        .comm   arr.2789,4096,32
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits
share|improve this answer
3  
+1; an added benefit is it doesn't rely on the asm keyword which, as I'm sure you know, won't work on all platforms. –  John Dibling Jun 12 '12 at 12:54
1  
This will work only on the i686 and later families of x86 CPUs, e.g. the ones with the CMOV instruction available. Practically, it's whatever CPU that was made after the Pentium Pro (except Pentium MMX), so you should be fine unless one of your users happens to have a >10 years old machine. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jun 12 '12 at 13:57
1  
@Daniel: if you just use the C version though then you should get pretty much optimal code regardless (assuming a half-decent compiler) –  Paul R Jun 12 '12 at 17:52
    
Of course, you're right. I was just pointing out the facts coming from this particular code. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jun 12 '12 at 20:52
    
@FredOverflow: Does the cmovge really result in a pipeline stall? There doesn't seem to be a conditional jump in the assembly output you show. What version of the compiler did you use? –  jxh Apr 25 at 23:41
add comment

This one has no branches, and doesn't suffer from overflow or underflow:

return (a > b) - (a < b);

With gcc -O2 -S, this compiles down to the following six instructions:

xorl    %eax, %eax
cmpl    %esi, %edi
setl    %dl
setg    %al
movzbl  %dl, %edx
subl    %edx, %eax

Here's some code to benchmark various compare implementations:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define COUNT 1024
#define LOOPS 500
#define COMPARE compare2
#define USE_RAND 1

int arr[COUNT];

int compare1 (int a, int b)
{
    if (a < b) return -1;
    if (a > b) return 1;
    return 0;
}

int compare2 (int a, int b)
{
    return (a > b) - (a < b);
}

int compare3 (int a, int b)
{
    return (a < b) ? -1 : (a > b);
}

int compare4 (int a, int b)
{
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "sub %1, %0 \n\t"
        "jno 1f \n\t"
        "cmc \n\t"
        "rcr %0 \n\t"
        "1: "
    : "+r"(a)
    : "r"(b)
    : "cc");
    return a;
}

int main ()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
#if USE_RAND
        arr[i] = rand();
#else
        for (int b = 0; b < sizeof(arr[i]); b++) {
            *((unsigned char *)&arr[i] + b) = rand();
        }
#endif
    }

    int sum = 0;

    for (int l = 0; l < LOOPS; l++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < COUNT; j++) {
                sum += COMPARE(arr[i], arr[j]);
            }
        }
    }

    printf("%d=0\n", sum);

    return 0;
}

The results on my 64-bit system, compiled with gcc -std=c99 -O2, for positive integers (USE_RAND=1):

compare1: 0m1.118s
compare2: 0m0.756s
compare3: 0m1.101s
compare4: 0m0.561s

Out of C-only solutions, the one I suggested was the fastest. user315052's solution was slower despite compiling to only 5 instructions. The slowdown is likely because, despite having one less instruction, there is a conditional instruction (cmovge).

Overall, FredOverflow's 4-instruction assembly implementation was the fastest when used with positive integers. However, this code only benchmarked the integer range RAND_MAX, so the 4-instuction test is biased, because it handles overflows separately, and these don't occur in the test; the speed may be due to successful branch prediction.

With a full range of integers (USE_RAND=0), the 4-instruction solution is in fact very slow (others are the same):

compare4: 0m1.897s
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 from me, nice job. –  jxh Jun 12 '12 at 15:38
1  
+1: definitely the best answer (so far !) - I'd give it a second up-vote if I could for actually benchmarking the various alternatives. –  Paul R Jun 12 '12 at 17:57
    
Can you modify the benchmark to generate the full spectrum of integers? What happens if you replace rand() with rand() | rand() << 17? –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 18:45
    
@FredOverflow: done (but I just used rand() on each byte) –  Ambroz Bizjak Jun 12 '12 at 18:56
    
That's one strange piece of code, but anyway, +1 from me :) –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 19:04
show 2 more comments

Okay, I managed to get it down to four instructions :) The basic idea is as follows:

Half the time, the difference is small enough to fit into an integer. In that case, just return the difference. Otherwise, shift the number one to the right. The crucial question is what bit to shift into the MSB then.

Let's look at two extreme examples, using 8 bits instead of 32 bits for the sake of simplicity:

 10000000 INT_MIN
 01111111 INT_MAX
---------
000000001 difference
 00000000 shifted

 01111111 INT_MAX
 10000000 INT_MIN
---------
111111111 difference
 11111111 shifted

Shifting the carry bit in would yield 0 for the first case (although INT_MIN is not equal to INT_MAX) and some negative number for the second case (although INT_MAX is not smaller than INT_MIN).

But if we flip the carry bit before doing the shift, we get sensible numbers:

 10000000 INT_MIN
 01111111 INT_MAX
---------
000000001 difference
100000001 carry flipped
 10000000 shifted

 01111111 INT_MAX
 10000000 INT_MIN
---------
111111111 difference
011111111 carry flipped
 01111111 shifted

I'm sure there's a deep mathematical reason why it makes sense to flip the carry bit, but I don't see it yet.

int compare_int(int a, int b)
{
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "sub %1, %0 \n\t"
        "jno 1f \n\t"
        "cmc \n\t"
        "rcr %0 \n\t"
        "1: "
    : "+r"(a)
    : "r"(b)
    : "cc");
    return a;
}

I have tested the code with one million random inputs plus every combination of INT_MIN, -INT_MAX, INT_MIN/2, -1, 0, 1, INT_MAX/2, INT_MAX/2+1, INT_MAX. All tests passed. Can you proove me wrong?

share|improve this answer
    
+1, wow, that's cool. –  jxh Jun 12 '12 at 17:00
2  
Have you benchmarked it? Less ASM instructions != efficient. –  mfontanini Jun 12 '12 at 17:51
    
Even though it's 4 instructions, you may still find that a 5 or 6 instruction branchless sequence is faster. –  Paul R Jun 12 '12 at 17:53
    
@mfontanini I expect my solution to be the slowest by far for random inputs. If the overflow rarely happens, on the other hand, I would expect it to perform very well (branch prediction). Anyway, I just found it challenging to find an even shorter solution :) –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 18:20
1  
You will see that the inverted carry indeed equals the correct sign upon signed overflow if you write out the truth table for a one-bit full subtractor. In the process keep in mind that for the correct sign and signed overflow calculations minuend bit=1 and subtrahend bit=1 should be treated as -1 arithmetically and the sum isn't overflowed IFF it's 0 or -1. So, your conjecture is correct. –  Alexey Frunze Jun 14 '12 at 9:26
show 1 more comment

For what it's worth I put together an SSE2 implementation. vec_compare1 uses the same approach as compare2 but requires just three SSE2 arithmetic instructions:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <emmintrin.h>

#define COUNT 1024
#define LOOPS 500
#define COMPARE vec_compare1
#define USE_RAND 1

int arr[COUNT] __attribute__ ((aligned(16)));

typedef __m128i vSInt32;

vSInt32 vec_compare1 (vSInt32 va, vSInt32 vb)
{
    vSInt32 vcmp1 = _mm_cmpgt_epi32(va, vb);
    vSInt32 vcmp2 = _mm_cmpgt_epi32(vb, va);
    return _mm_sub_epi32(vcmp2, vcmp1);
}

int main ()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
#if USE_RAND
        arr[i] = rand();
#else
        for (int b = 0; b < sizeof(arr[i]); b++) {
            *((unsigned char *)&arr[i] + b) = rand();
        }
#endif
    }

    vSInt32 vsum = _mm_set1_epi32(0);

    for (int l = 0; l < LOOPS; l++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < COUNT; j+=4) {
                vSInt32 v1 = _mm_loadu_si128(&arr[i]);
                vSInt32 v2 = _mm_load_si128(&arr[j]);
                vSInt32 v = COMPARE(v1, v2);
                vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, v);
            }
        }
    }

    printf("vsum = %vd\n", vsum);

    return 0;
}

Time for this is 0.137s.

Time for compare2 with the same CPU and compiler is 0.674s.

So the SSE2 implementation is around 4x faster, as might be expected (since it's 4-wide SIMD).

share|improve this answer
add comment

This code has no branches and uses 5 instructions. It may outperform other branch-less alternatives on recent Intel processors, where cmov* instructions are quite expensive. Disadvantage is non-symmetrical return value (INT_MIN+1, 0, 1).

int compare_int (int a, int b)
{
    int res;

    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "xor %0, %0 \n\t"
        "cmpl %2, %1 \n\t"
        "setl %b0 \n\t"
        "rorl $1, %0 \n\t"
        "setnz %b0 \n\t"
    : "=q"(res)
    : "r"(a)
    , "r"(b)
    : "cc"
    );

    return res;
}

This variant does not need initialization, so it uses only 4 instructions:

int compare_int (int a, int b)
{
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "subl %1, %0 \n\t"
        "setl %b0 \n\t"
        "rorl $1, %0 \n\t"
        "setnz %b0 \n\t"
    : "+q"(a)
    : "r"(b)
    : "cc"
    );

    return a;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There seems to be a flaw in your proposed solution, see my edit. –  FredOverflow Jun 13 '12 at 16:53
    
@FredOverflow: that's right, 'res' initialization was missing. –  Evgeny Kluev Jun 13 '12 at 17:34
add comment

Maybe you can use the following idea (in pseudo-code; didn't write asm-code because i am not comfortable with syntax):

  1. Subtract the numbers (result = a - b)
  2. If no overflow, done (jo instruction and branch prediction should work very well here)
  3. If there was overflow, use any robust method (return (a < b) ? -1 : (a > b))

Edit: for additional simplicity: if there was overflow, flip the sign of the result, instead of step 3.

share|improve this answer
    
Your alternative step 3 does not work for compare_int(0, -2147483648). –  FredOverflow Jun 12 '12 at 14:49
    
Agreed, it was a bad optimization –  anatolyg Jun 12 '12 at 15:03
add comment

You could consider promoting the integers to 64bit values.

share|improve this answer
1  
You could, but since you have to return an int you would still need to deal with any overflow. –  Paul R Jun 12 '12 at 12:35
    
@PaulR: Just mask out the extra bits. –  Puppy Jun 12 '12 at 12:39
3  
No - it would need more than that - consider the case where a - b can't be represented in 32 bits - the resulting sign if you just mask the high bits will be incorrect. You would need to e.g. saturate at 64 bits before converting back to 32 bits. This would take a lot more than 5 instructions. –  Paul R Jun 12 '12 at 12:43
    
@PaulR: x64 has arithmetic shift instructions you can use. –  Puppy Jun 12 '12 at 12:59
1  
@DeadMG: But those would round either -1 or +1 to zero, incorrectly. I'd think along lines of x = x | x>>32, logical shift. That gets the sign bit where it should be, and ensures that only 0LL ends up as zero. The one bug it has is that 0x80000000LL is treated as a negative value. –  MSalters Jun 12 '12 at 13:28
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