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Should we declare the private fields as volatile if the instanced are used in multiple threads?

In Effective Java, there is an example where the code doesn't work without volatile:

import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

// Broken! - How long would you expect this program to run?
public class StopThread {
    private static boolean stopRequested; // works, if volatile is here

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Thread backgroundThread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                int i = 0;
                while (!stopRequested)
                    i++;
            }
        });
        backgroundThread.start();
        TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1);
        stopRequested = true;
    }
}

The explanations says that

while(!stopRequested)
    i++;

is optimized to something like this:

if(!stopRequested)
    while(true)
        i++;

so further modifications of stopRequested aren't seen by the background thread, so it loops forever. (BTW, that code terminates without volatile on JRE7.)

Now consider this class:

public class Bean {
    private boolean field = true;

    public boolean getField() {
        return field;
    }

    public void setField(boolean value) {
        field = value;
    }
}

and a thread as follows:

public class Worker implements Runnable {
    private Bean b;

    public Worker(Bean b) {
        this.b = b;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while(b.getField()) {
            System.err.println("Waiting...");
            try { Thread.sleep(1000); }
            catch(InterruptedException ie) { return; }
        }
    }
}

The above code works as expected without using volatiles:

public class VolatileTest {
    public static void main(String [] args) throws Exception {
        Bean b = new Bean();

        Thread t = new Thread(new Worker(b));
        t.start();
        Thread.sleep(3000);

        b.setField(false); // stops the child thread
        System.err.println("Waiting the child thread to quit");
        t.join();
        // if the code gets, here the child thread is stopped
        // and it really gets, with JRE7, 6 with -server, -client
    }
}

I think because of the public setter, the compiler/JVM should never optimize the code which calls getField(), but this article says that there is some "Volatile Bean" pattern (Pattern #4), which should be applied to create mutable thread-safe classes. Update: maybe that article applies for IBM JVM only?

The question is: which part of JLS explicitly or implicitly says that private primitive fields with public getters/setters must be declared as volatile (or they don't have to)?

Sorry for a long question, I tried to explain the problem in details. Let me know if something is not clear. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
it's not like you need that field to cancel the thread, you could use the interrupted flag on the thread. –  Nathan Hughes Jun 12 '12 at 12:47
1  
@NathanHughes, these classes are just minimal examples, the actual code is different, no thread interruption is needed there. –  khachik Jun 12 '12 at 12:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Before I answer your question I want to address

BTW, that code terminates without volatile on JRE7

This can change if you were to deploy the same application with different runtime arguments. Hoisting isn't necessarily a default implementation for JVMs so it can work in one and not in another.

To answer your question there is nothing preventing the Java compiler from executing your latter example like so

@Override
public void run() {
    if(b.getField()){
        while(true) {
            System.err.println("Waiting...");
            try { Thread.sleep(1000); }
            catch(InterruptedException ie) { return; }
        }
    }
}

It is still sequentially consistent and thus maintains Java's guarantees - you can read specifically 17.4.3:

Among all the inter-thread actions performed by each thread t, the program order of t is a total order that reflects the order in which these actions would be performed according to the intra-thread semantics of t.

A set of actions is sequentially consistent if all actions occur in a total order (the execution order) that is consistent with program order, and furthermore, each read r of a variable v sees the value written by the write w to v such that:

In other words - So long as a thread will see the read and write of a field in the same order regardless of the compiler/memory re ordering it is considered sequentially consistent.

share|improve this answer

The question is: which part of JLS explicitly or implicitly says that private primitive fields with public getters/setters must be declared as volatile (or they don't have to)?

The JLS memory model doesn't care about getters/setters. They're no-ops from the memory model perspective - you could as well be accessing public fields. Wrapping the boolean behind a method call doesn't affect its memory visibility. Your latter example works purely by luck.

Should we declare the private fields as volatile if the instanced are used in multiple threads?

If a class (bean) is to be used in multithreaded environment, you must somehow take that into account. Making private fields volatile is one approach: it ensures that each thread is guaranteed to see the latest value of that field, not anything cached / optimized away stale values. But it doesn't solve the problem of atomicity.

The article you linked to applies to any JVM that adheres to the JVM specification (which the JLS leans on). You will get various results depending on the JVM vendor, version, flags, computer and OS, the number of times you run the program (HotSpot optimizations often kick in after the 10000th run) etc, so you really must understand the spec and carefully adhere to the rules in order to create reliable programs. Experimenting in this case is a poor way to find out how things work because the JVM can behave in any way it wants as long at it falls within the spec, and most JVMs do contain loads of all kind of dynamic optimizations.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. Setting a boolean variable (or any other primitive variable except long/double) is an atomic operation. My question is about how the JSL defines the code behavior in this case. Or how it does not define, if it is clear what I mean. –  khachik Jun 12 '12 at 12:44
    
The JLS doesn't define anything particular in your case. A bean is just variables behind method calls, the memory model applies as it is. Method calls are no-ops from the memory model perspective. By atomicity I mean that your bean could end up in inconsistent state, if you have fields that logically depend on each other: for example, "start" time should be before "end" time or something like that - it's not guaranteed unless you have a mechanism to change those two fields atomically. –  Joonas Pulakka Jun 12 '12 at 12:55
    
By the way, writes and reads of volatile long and double values are always atomic. See JLS 17.7. –  Joonas Pulakka Jun 12 '12 at 13:03
1  
@John Vint: From 17.7: Writes and reads of volatile long and double values are always atomic. That's not implementation specific. What is implementation specific is writes and reads of non-volatile 64-bit values. –  Joonas Pulakka Jun 12 '12 at 13:46
    
Oh you're right, sorry. I miss read your statement reading it as By the way writes and reads of long and double values are always atomic –  John Vint Jun 12 '12 at 14:16

No, that code is just as incorrect. Nothing in the JLS says a field must be declared as volatile. However, if you want your code to work correctly in a multi-threaded environment, then you have to obey the visibility rules. volatile and synchronized are two of the major facilities for correctly making data visible across threads.

As for your example, the difficulty of writing multi-threaded code is that many forms of incorrect code work fine in testing. Just because a multi-threaded test "succeeds" in testing does not mean it is correct code.

For the specific JLS reference, see the Happens Before section (and the rest of the page).

Note, as a general rule of thumb, if you think you have come up with a clever new way to get around "standard" thread-safe idioms, you are most likely wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
if nothing in the JSL says that the field must be be declared as volatile, how do you know that it must be declared as volatile? Your opinion about testing mutli-threaded code is more than OK, but the question was about the JSL. –  khachik Jun 12 '12 at 12:48
    
@khachik - the JLS gives specific details of what you must do to make your code thread-safe. there are a variety of options in the section i referenced. nothing in the JLS requires you to make your code thread-safe, thus you don't have to make the field volatile (otherwise all fields would just be volatile by default). –  jtahlborn Jun 12 '12 at 12:51
    
sure. It does not answer my question. –  khachik Jun 13 '12 at 7:02
    
@khachik - maybe you could explain which part of your question it doesn't answer? –  jtahlborn Jun 13 '12 at 12:54
    
"then you have to obey the visibility rules" - what part of the JLS defines those rules? The link you posted does not contain it. If that behavior is not defines in the JLS explicitly, what part of the JLS implies it? Is my question clear? –  khachik Jun 14 '12 at 7:34

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