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The following code appears to both be valid:

$a = ('hello');
$b = 'world';

I'm not familiar with this parenthesis notation, though. What is it for? How is it different without the parenthesis?

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doesn't ('hello') just evaluate to 'hello'? If you said $a = (3+5); that's the same as saying $a = (8); –  Hans Z Jun 12 '12 at 12:55
    
i think what he means to ask is does it force any sort of type conversion... –  redskins80 Jun 12 '12 at 13:02
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Similar to all basic maths. It helps separate calculations. E g. (2x2)+3=7 but 2x(2+3)=10.

It instructs the compiler to deal with each instruction in a certain order.

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There's no difference between the two. Using parentheses only tells PHP to evaluate the expression before doing anything else.

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The parentheses allow you to force a certain order of evaluation for the involved operators, e.g. when you use non-commutative operators, such as -:

$x = (2-2)-2; // = -2
$x = 2-(2-2); // =  2

Since you don't perform any operation, you can simply discard or add parentheses at will.

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In this case there is no difference.

Parentheses mean that this is an expression, and it's result will be stored in the variable.

In this case the expression does "no operation" at all:

$a = ('hello');

so parentheses are completely useless. In other cases, you just consider them like an expression, much as a mathematical one.

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