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I am trying to define a number of classes based on an abstract base class. Each of these classes basically defines a cell shape for a visualisation package. The cell is comprised of a number of vertices (points) and each subclass will require a different number of points. Each class can be thought of as a container for a fixed number of point coordinates.

As an example, consider the base class Shape, which is simply a container for a list of coordinates:

class Shape(object):
    """Cell shape base class."""
    def __init__(self, sequence):
        self.points = sequence

    @property
    def points(self):
        return self._points

    @points.setter
    def points(self, sequence):
        # Error checking goes here, e.g. check that `sequence` is a
        # sequence of numeric values.
        self._points = sequence

Ideally I want to be able to define, say, a Square class, where the points.setter method checks that sequence is of length four. Furthermore I would like a user to not be able to instantiate Shape. Is there a way I can define Shape to be an abstract base class? I have tried changing the definition of shape to the following:

import abc

class Shape(object):
    """Cell shape base class."""

    __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta

    def __init__(self, sequence):
        self.points = sequence

    @abc.abstractproperty
    def npoints(self):
        pass

    @property
    def points(self):
        return self._points

    @points.setter
    def points(self, sequence):
        # Error checking goes here...
        if len(sequence) != self.npoints:
            raise TypeError('Some descriptive error message!')

        self._points = sequence

This requires subclasses to define the property npoints. I can then define a class Square as

class Square(Shape):
    @property
    def npoints(self):
        return 4

However, this would be rather tedious to implement for a large number of sublcasses (and with more than one property to implement). I was hoping to define a class factory which would create my subclasses for me, something along the lines of:

def Factory(name, npoints):
    return type(name, (Shape,), dict(npoints=npoints))

Triangle = Factory('Triangle', 3)    
Square = Factory('Square', 4)
# etc...

Is this class factory function a valid approach to take, or am I clobbering the npoints property? Is it better to replace the call to type with something more verbose like:

def Factory(name, _npoints):
    class cls(Shape):
        @property
        def npoints(self):
            return _npoints
    cls.__name__ = name
    return cls

An alternative approach would be to define a class attribute _NPOINTS and change the npoints property of Shape to

@property
def npoints(self):
    return _NPOINTS

However, then I loose the benefit of using an abstract base class since:

  • I can't see how to define a class attribute using type, and
  • I don't know how to define an abstract class attribute.

Does anyone have any thoughts on the best way to implement this abstract base class and class factory function, or even an altogether better design?

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4  
This is all looking quite Java: abstract classes, getters and setters, type checking etc. While you can do this stuff in Python, you usually don't need to. Only write getters and setters if there is a real benefit to them, and only check types if necessary – otherwise rely on duck typing. Abstract base classes are not meant to be used too commonly. –  Sven Marnach Jun 12 '12 at 13:05
    
@SvenMarnach I agree that duck typing feels more natural in Python and I rely on this a lot is other parts of my application. However, I feel that deriving from a common base class is benefical here - I need to define a given number of cell types based on a visualisation package specification. Only sequences with a certain number of points are allowed by the specification. By defining a number of classes like I try to in the question (with additional methods like __iter__) I ensure that users of my application can easily create sequences which conform to the specification. –  Chris Jun 12 '12 at 13:46
    
What will happen if the data does not comform to the specification? Won't the visualisation framework give an error anyway? Why not simply rely on that errors? –  Sven Marnach Jun 12 '12 at 13:55
    
__init should be __init__... –  Eric Jun 12 '12 at 13:58
    
@SvenMarnach I could, and I do in places. The classes I am trying to define here are convenience classes to help the user create objects that meet the specification so they don't have to construct them themselves. The classes I am trying to create are more complex than the one in my question, which are just a minimal example. Most of my code replies on duck typing, here I am creating helper classes that I can tell a user definately wont raise errors if passed around my application. Thanks for your comments. –  Chris Jun 12 '12 at 14:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without knowing more about your project, I cannot give specific advice on the general design. I will just provide a few more general hints and thoughts.

  1. Dynamically generated classes are often a sign that you don't need separate classes at all – simply write a single class that incorparates all the functionality. What's the problem with a Shape class that gets it's properties at instantiation time? (Of course there are reasons to use dynamically generated classes – the namedtuple() factory function is one example. I couldn't find any specific reasons in your question, however.)

  2. Instead of using abstract base classes, you often simply document the intended interface, and than write classes conforming to this interface. Due to the dynamic nature of Python, you don't strictly need a common base class. There are often other advantages to a common base class – for example shared functionality.

  3. Only check for application code errors if not doing so leads to strange errors in unrelated places. If, say, your function expects an iterable, simply assume you got an iterable. If the user passed in something else, you code will fail when it tries to iterate the passed in object anyway, and the error message will usually be enough for the application developer to understand the error.

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