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I want to create an extension method like this

public static bool AllConsecutives(this IEnumerable<int> intValues )

This method should return true if all items in the list are consecutive (with no gaps)

some test cases

(new List<int>() {2, 3, 4, 5, 6}).AllConsecutives() == true
(new List<int>() {3, 7, 4, 5, 6}).AllConsecutives() == true //as it is not sensitive to list order
(new List<int>() {2, 3, 4, 7, 6}).AllConsecutives() == false //as the five is missing
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1  
What have you tried so far? –  Paddy Jun 12 '12 at 13:13
    
yes, and? have you tried something? –  MBen Jun 12 '12 at 13:13
    
I tried with the aggregate function, but couldn't work out what the seed and accumulator should be. –  HK_CH Jun 12 '12 at 13:27
    
Aggregate would work only for an ordered list, imo, since you always visit two consecutive items. –  phg Jun 12 '12 at 13:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted
int expected = intValues.Min();
foreach(int actual in intValues.OrderBy(x => x))
{
    if (actual != expected++)
       return false;
}

return true;

You can also verify, that collection has at least one item, before executing Min. Or you can sort items prior to taking min (in this case it will be first one, or will not be any, if collection is empty). Also in this case you will save one iteration for finding minimal value:

var sortedValues = intValues.OrderBy(x => x);
int expected = sortedValues.FirstOrDefault();

foreach (int actual in sortedValues)
{
    if (actual != expected++)
        return false;
}

return true;
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work with OP's second example. –  ken2k Jun 12 '12 at 13:17
    
He wanted it to be independent of order. Maybe there's something faster than sorting it first and than apply you algo? –  phg Jun 12 '12 at 13:17
    
Sorry, didn't see that it should be order-independent –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 12 '12 at 13:18
    
The list order is not sensitive, therefore { 3, 2, 1 } would fail in your example, but by the examples given, it would be pass. –  Richard Jun 12 '12 at 13:19
1  
No, it will not fail on first two examples, because expected incremented after comparison. But yes, first item could be Skipped. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jun 12 '12 at 13:28

Tried and seems to work with the given examples

public static bool AllConsecutives(this IEnumerable<int> intValues ) 
{
    var ord = intValues.OrderBy(i => i);
    int curV = ord.Min();
    foreach(int x in ord)
    {
        if(x != curV)
           return false;
        curV++;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

The list is consecutive if it does not contains duplicates and the difference between the max. and min. values is equal to the number of items in the list minus one, so:

public static bool AllConsecutives(this IEnumerable<int> intValues) 
{
   int minValue = Int32.MaxValue;
   int maxValue = Int32.MinValue;
   int count = 0;
   HashSet<int> values = new HashSet<int>();
   foreach (int intValue in intValues) {
     if (values.Contains(intValue))         
       return false;
     values.Add(intValue);
     if (intValue > maxValue)
       maxValue = intValue;
     if (intValue < minValue)
       minValue = intValue;
     count++;
   }
   return (count == 0) || (maxValue-minValue+1 == count);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did I overlook something or is values always empty? –  phg Jun 12 '12 at 13:26
    
@png: whops...thanks, fixed –  MiMo Jun 12 '12 at 13:36
    
+1 for O(n) solution, no sorting. –  David B Jun 12 '12 at 19:37
    
@DavidB: thanks...I was losing hope that someone noticed that the sort is not necessary..and is now marked as the answer –  MiMo Jun 12 '12 at 20:01
    
Now that it works, I like this one better, too. –  phg Jun 13 '12 at 5:24

Error checking and using Linq:

 public static class myExtension
{

   public static bool AllConsecutives(this IEnumerable<int> targetList)
   {
      bool result = false;

      if ((targetList != null) && (targetList.Any ()))
      {
         var ordered = targetList.OrderBy (l => l);

         int first = ordered.First ();

         result = ordered.All (item => item == first++);

      }

      return result;

   }

}

// tested with

void Main()
{
 Console.WriteLine ( (new List<int>() {2, 3, 4, 5, 6}).AllConsecutives() ); // true
 Console.WriteLine ( (new List<int>() {3, 7, 4, 5, 6}).AllConsecutives() ); // true //as it is not sensitive to list order
 Console.WriteLine ( (new List<int>() {2, 3, 4, 7, 6}).AllConsecutives() ); // false //as the five is missing
}
share|improve this answer

Something like this:

if (intValues.Count() <= 1)
                return true;

var ordered = intValues.OrderBy(i => i).ToList();

return (ordered.First() + ordered.Count() - 1) == ordered.Last();
share|improve this answer
    
{2, 3, 4, 7, 6} passes this. –  Rawling Jun 12 '12 at 13:18
    
Yes, just occurred to me as caffiene hit... –  Paddy Jun 12 '12 at 13:19
    
Why do you sort three times? –  David B Jun 12 '12 at 19:39
    
I don't think that I do. –  Paddy Jun 12 '12 at 20:17
    
OrderBy is deferred until its result is enumerated. The result is enumerated by the call to First, the call to Count and the call to Last. –  David B Jun 13 '12 at 13:53
list.Sort();
return !list.Skip(1).Where((i, j) => (i != (list[j] + 1))).Any();
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Another possible solution that doesn't requires sorting, is to use hashset, and while building the hashset you can hold the min value. With this the run time will be O(n). This will not take care of duplicate values which you can just add a check while building the hashset and see if the hashset already contains the value.

HashSet<int> hash = new HashSet<int>();
int minValue = int.MaxValue;
foreach(int i in list)
{
    if(minValue > i)
        minValue = i;
        hash.Add(i);
}

for(int count = 1; count < list.Count; ++count)
{
    if(!hash.Contains(++minValue))
        return false;

}
return true;
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