Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to test that the Rails logger receives messages in some of my specs. I am using the Logging gem.

Let's say that I have a class like this:

class BaseWorker

  def execute
    logger.info 'Starting the worker...'
  end

end

And a spec like:

describe BaseWorker do

  it 'should log an info message' do
    base_worker = BaseWorker.new
    logger_mock = double('Logging::Rails').as_null_object
    Logging::Rails.stub_chain(:logger, :info).and_return(logger_mock)

    logger_mock.should_receive(:info).with('Starting the worker...')
    base_worker.execute
    Logging::Rails.unstub(:logger)
  end

end

I get the following failure message:

 Failure/Error: logger_mock.should_receive(:info).with('Starting worker...')
   (Double "Logging::Rails").info("Starting worker...")
       expected: 1 time
       received: 0 times

I've tried out several different approaches to get the spec to pass. This works for example:

class BaseWorker

  attr_accessor :log

  def initialize
    @log = logger
  end

  def execute
    @log.info 'Starting the worker...'
  end

end

describe BaseWorker do
  it 'should log an info message' do
    base_worker = BaseWorker.new
    logger_mock = double('logger')
    base_worker.log = logger_mock

    logger_mock.should_receive(:info).with('Starting the worker...')
    base_worker.execute
  end
end

But having to setup an accessible instance variable like that seems like the tail is wagging the dog here. (Actually, I'm not even sure why copying logger to @log would make it pass.)

What's a good solution for testing the logging?

share|improve this question
1  
That question did arise several times on SO, see for example here and here and the general consensus was that you don't test logging unless it's a project requirement. – Art Shayderov Jun 12 '12 at 17:49
1  
Art, thanks for the comment. I did read those ones. That may be the ultimate answer. – keruilin Jun 12 '12 at 19:10
up vote 37 down vote accepted

While I agree you generally don't want to test loggers, there are times it may be useful.

I have had success with expectations on Rails.logger.

Using RSpec's deprecated should syntax:

Rails.logger.should_receive(:info).with("some message")

Using RSpec's newer expect syntax:

expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:info).with("some message")

Note: In controller and model specs, you have to put this line before the message is logged. If you put it after, you'll get an error message like this:

Failure/Error: expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:info).with("some message")
       (#<ActiveSupport::Logger:0x007f27f72136c8>).info("some message")
           expected: 1 time with arguments: ("some message")
           received: 0 times
share|improve this answer
    
I have the similar case expect my expected string is a partial string, I could not figure out so far, how to deal with it, any help? – Amol Pujari Dec 9 '14 at 12:45
1  
@AmolPujari expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:info).with(/partial_string/) where "partial_string" is the string you're looking for. Simple Regex compare – absessive Jan 26 '15 at 20:28
    
This is great, I'm checking I don't get anything at all logged to error and checking against Rspec's anything matcher does this nicely: expect(Rails.logger).to_not receive(:error).with(anything) – mr_than Feb 13 '15 at 9:17
2  
what exactly do you mean by "you have to put this line before the message is logged"? The expectation appears in the code before the code that generates the log? I'm doing that and getting an error because the logger is getting the message that is logged from stuff being done in my let expressions before the it block even runs – sixty4bit Mar 5 '15 at 16:09
    
@sixty4bit it means, that expext.. receive works as an event listener - you have to set it up first and then launch the code that will log the message you want to catch – banesto Nov 17 '15 at 20:40

With RSpec 3+ version

Actual code containing single invocation of Rails.logger.error:

Rails.logger.error "Some useful error message"

Spec code:

expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:error).with(/error message/)

If you want the error message to be actually logged while the spec runs then use following code:

expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:error).with(/error message/).and_call_original

Actual code containing multiple invocations of Rails.logger.error:

Rails.logger.error "Technical Error Message"
Rails.logger.error "User-friendly Error Message"

Spec code:

    expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:error).ordered
    expect(Rails.logger).to receive(:error).with(/User-friendly Error /).ordered.and_call_original

Note in above variation setting .ordered is important else expectations set start failing.

In Rails context I have verified the above code to work as expected however with info and debug levels it doesn't seem to work in straightforward manner. I guess its because of Rails internally using debug and info levels which may be causing errors like

(#<ActiveSupport::Logger:0x00000006c55778>).info(*(any args))
    expected: 1 time with any arguments
    received: 4 times with any arguments

References:

http://www.relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-mocks/v/3-4/docs/setting-constraints/matching-arguments

http://www.relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-mocks/v/3-4/docs/setting-constraints/message-order

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.