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I have a large buffer:

char *buf = malloc(1000000000); // 1GB

If I forked a new process, it would have a buf which shared memory with the parent's buf until one or the other wrote to it. Even then, only one new 4KiB block would need to be allocated by the kernel, the rest would continue to be shared.

I'd like to make a copy of buf, but I'm only going to change a little of the copy. I'd like copy-on-write behaviour without forking. (Like you get for free when forking.)

Is this possible?

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sure, but it won't be 'for free' - you'll have to your own memory management and keep track of changes. –  Marc B Jun 12 '12 at 14:41
    
Yes, I want 'for free'. I was wondering whether there were any mmap based solutions, or maybe something I hadn't even imagined. –  chrisdew Jun 12 '12 at 14:45
    
Perhaps mmap with MAP_ANONYMOUS and MAP_PRIVATE would do the job? –  chrisdew Jun 12 '12 at 14:48
    
possible duplicate of Can I do a copy-on-write memcpy in Linux? –  ugoren Jun 12 '12 at 15:05
    
Yes, this is a dup. –  chrisdew Jun 12 '12 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You'll want to create a file on disk or a POSIX shared memory segment (shm_open) for the block. The first time, map it with MAP_SHARED. When you're ready to make a copy and switch to COW, call mmap again with MAP_FIXED and MAP_PRIVATE to map over top of your original map, and with MAP_PRIVATE to make the second copy. This should get you the effects you want.

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That looks very encouraging, but I can't get it to work. I get a bus error (on line 13). fd == 3. Could you point out my stupid mistake? gist.github.com/2924412 –  chrisdew Jun 13 '12 at 14:29
    
You need ftruncate to give the shared memory segment a size. The initial size is zero. –  R.. Jun 13 '12 at 15:16
    
Thanks, I added an ftruncate and now have a segfault instead of a bus error, still at line 14. –  chrisdew Jun 13 '12 at 15:26
    
I suspect the crash is actually at line 17 where you write to the buffer. Your debug printf's are useless because you're not flushing output and they don't even end in \n.. –  R.. Jun 13 '12 at 15:30
1  
It works! gist.github.com/2924412 Whay was the point of the commented out remapping of buf? I don't seem to need it. Many thanks. –  chrisdew Jun 13 '12 at 15:59

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