Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var s = 3;

    Func<int, Func<int>> func = 
        x => () =>
    {
        return x;
    };

    var result1 = func(s);

    func = null;

    s = 5;

    var result2 = result1();

    Console.WriteLine(result2);


    Console.ReadKey();
}

My understanding is that x is not actually declared as a variable eg. var x = 3. Instead, it's passed into the outer function, which returns a function that returns the original value. At the time it is returning this, it creates a closure around x to remember its value. Then later on, if you alter s, it has no effect.

Is this right?

(Output is 3 by the way, which I'd expect).

Edit: here's a diagram as to why I think it is

Closure example

x=3 is passed into the func, and it returns a function that simply returns x. But x doesn't exist in the inner function, only its parent, and its parent no longer exists after I make it null. Where is x stored, when the inner function is ran? It must create a closure from the parent.

Further clarification:

    int s = 0;

    Func<int, Func<int>> func = 
        x => () =>
    {
        return x;
    };

    for (s = 0; s < 5; s++)
    {
        var result1 = func(s);

        var result2 = result1();

        Console.WriteLine(result2);
    };

Output is 0, 1, 2, 3, 4

However with your example:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int s = 0;

    Func<int, Func<int>> func = 
        x => () =>
    {
        return s;
    };

    List<Func<int>> results = new List<Func<int>>();

    for (s = 0; s < 5; s++)
    {
         results.Add(func(s));
    };

    foreach (var b in results)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(b());
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}

The output is 5 5 5 5 5, which isn't what you want. It hasn't captured the value of the variable, it's merely retained a reference to the original s.

Closures are created in javascript precisely to avoid this problem.

share|improve this question
1  
Func<int, Func<int>> func = x => () => x + s; would close over s –  asawyer Jun 12 '12 at 14:43
    
Actually, who's to say that the later isn't what they want? It's the power (and danger) of closures. You are closing on s, and then modifying s before it's invoked. –  James Michael Hare Jun 12 '12 at 15:41
    
Also your last example doesn't make sense, you're passing in s but also closing on s in the lambda itself (the return s clause), leaving x unused... –  James Michael Hare Jun 12 '12 at 15:43
    
You're right on both counts, of course. In many cases, I bet it is what they want. Correct, x is unused in the 2nd example (I just didn't bother removing it). I might post a follow up question asking why in the 01234 example, the output is not also 55555, because it's storing x somewhere, but strangely not as a reference to s. It's probably just as simple as it's storing it unboxed, and so it reverts to a value type. –  SLC Jun 12 '12 at 15:47
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

No, that's not a closure on s, x is just an argument to the lambda expression which generates a delegate (which could actually be simplified to x => () => x.

        Func<int, Func<int>> func = x => () => x;

        var a = func(3);

        var b = func(5);

        Console.WriteLine(a());
        Console.WriteLine(b());

You'll get 3 and 5 as expected. In neither case does it actually remember x from the other time, but it does close on x locally during the duration of the outer lambda.

Basically, each call to x => () => x will create a new () => x delegate which captures the local value of x (not of the s passed in).

Even if you use s and pass it in, and change it, you still get 3 and 5:

        int s = 3;
        Func<int, Func<int>> func = x => () => x;

        var a = func(s);

        s = 5;

        var b = func(s);

        // 3 and 5 as expected
        Console.WriteLine(a());
        Console.WriteLine(b());

Now, it does capture on the local variable x within the local function, which is generated at every call. So the x won't persist between invocations of the larger lambda, but it will be captured if changed later in the lambda.

For example, let's say instead you had this:

        int s = 3;
        Func<int, Func<int>> func = x => 
            () => {
                      Func<int> result = () => x;
                      x = 10 * x;
                      return result;
                   };

        var a = func(s);

        s = 5;

        var b = func(s);

In this case, the closure on x within the anonymous method is more obvious. The results of running this will be 30 and 50 because modifications to x within the anonymous method affect the closure on the x local to that anonymous method, however, these do not carry over between calls, because it's only capturing the local x passed into the anonymous method, and not the s used to call it.

So, to sum up, in your diagram and example: * main passes s into the larger lambda (func in your diagram) * func closes on x at the time it's called to generate the anonymous method () => x

Once the call to the outer lambda is made (func) the closer begins and ends because it's local to that lambda only and doesn't close on anything from main.

Does that help?

share|improve this answer
    
There are three tiers of scope, the Main function, the 'func' function, and the returned function. X isn't stored anywhere, it's passed into the 'func' function, and stored there in a closure, such that when the inner function of return x; is called, it must ask its immediate parent for the value (3), which the parent stored in a closure, even though the parent has been made null. Or so I think. –  SLC Jun 12 '12 at 14:46
    
@SLC: updates above... –  James Michael Hare Jun 12 '12 at 14:52
2  
@SLC: The key point seems to be tripping you up was pointed out by Jesse in another comment. A closure "captures the variable, not the value." –  Brad Lord Jun 12 '12 at 15:10
1  
@slc: Because a closure captures the variable itself, it doesn't just copy the value, or it would be no differ.than a plain argument. –  James Michael Hare Jun 12 '12 at 15:20
2  
@SLC: It can certainly be crazy at times, fortunately there are code assist tools (ReSharper, etc) that will warn you if you're modifying over a closure so you can examine if that's really what you wanted to do. –  James Michael Hare Jun 12 '12 at 15:44
show 11 more comments

No, change

Func<int, Func<int>> func = 
    x => () =>
{
    return x;
};

to

Func<int, Func<int>> func = 
    x => () =>
{
    return s;
};

and it closes over the s variable.

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, modifying s should not affect the return value, but it does... it outputs 5 instead of 3 which I would not expect. –  SLC Jun 12 '12 at 14:52
1  
It's perfectly expected as it captures the variable, not the value. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 12 '12 at 14:59
    
Isn't the idea for the variable to remain in the scope it was passed in as? –  SLC Jun 12 '12 at 15:11
    
Nope. Lambdas capture variables. –  Jesse C. Slicer Jun 12 '12 at 15:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.