Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This drawing shows a tree of parent-child relationships. It is directed, without cycles. A child can have multiple parents.

The corresponding array of arrays in Perl is:

(
    [A C],
    [B C],
    [D F G],
    [C E D],
    [E J X I],
    [I J]
)

The first element in each sub-array is the parent of the rest, and the number of sub-arrays is the number of nodes who have at least one child.

Problem

I want to assign a number to each node which tells which level it is on in the graph. The level should also tell whether two nodes are independent, by which I mean they are not in direct parent-child relation. The answer to this specific example should (among many other answers) be:

[A B C D E F G X I J]
[1 1 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 5]

I solution can be implemented in any language, but Perl is preferred.

Still, non of the suggested solutions seems to work for this array:

(
  [ qw( Z A   )],
  [ qw( B D E ) ],
  [ qw( A B C ) ],    
  [ qw( G A E  )],
  [ qw( L B E )]  
)

as does

(
  [ qw/ M A / ],
  [ qw/ N A X / ],
  [ qw/ A B C / ],
  [ qw/ B D E / ],
  [ qw/ C F G / ], 
  [ qw/ F G / ]
  [ qw/ X C / ]
)
share|improve this question
    
What about a graph like ( [A B], [B A] )? Is the node list always sorted by "depth"? –  Qtax Jun 12 '12 at 15:04
    
This is just a breadth-first traversal. What have you tried? –  ikegami Jun 12 '12 at 16:05
    
@ikegami: It is more than a simple traversal because of the multiple roots. –  Borodin Jun 12 '12 at 16:07
    
@Borodin, Identifying the roots is trivial, and once you do, it's a trivial breadth-first search. –  ikegami Jun 12 '12 at 16:08
    
@ikegami: but there's no restriction we know about that says all the roots are on the same level. Imagine another edge [Y, X] or [M, C, J] –  Borodin Jun 12 '12 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

The Graph::Directed module will make it simpler to handle this kind of data.

Multiple source nodes makes it potentially more complicated (for instance if there was another edge [Y, X]) but as long as all the sources are at the first level it is workable.

Here is some code that produces the information you say you expect. It assumes all nodes below the top level are accessible from the first source node and measures their path length from there, ignoring the second source.

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

use Graph::Directed;

my @data = (
  [ qw/ A C / ],
  [ qw/ B C / ],
  [ qw/ D F G / ],
  [ qw/ C E D / ],
  [ qw/ E J X I / ],
  [ qw/ I J / ],
);

my $graph = Graph->new(directed => 1);

for my $item (@data) {
  my $parent = shift @$item;
  $graph->add_edge($parent, $_) for @$item;
}

my ($source) = $graph->source_vertices;

for my $vertex (sort $graph->vertices) {
  my $path;
  if ($graph->is_source_vertex($vertex)) {
    $path = 0;
  }
  else {
    $path = $graph->path_length($source, $vertex);
  }
  printf "%s - %d\n", $vertex, $path+1;
}

output

A - 1
B - 1
C - 2
D - 3
E - 3
F - 4
G - 4
I - 4
J - 4
X - 4
share|improve this answer
    
Just one thing; why do you need "sort $graph->vertices"? Thanks for the solution, apart from this one, easy to understand. –  Moni Jun 12 '12 at 18:36
    
the solution doesn't work for the array I just put in the problem section. Any way to find out what the problem may be. I know, it's much more complex array. –  Moni Jun 13 '12 at 16:01
    
$graph->vertices returns a list of all the vertices of the graph (A, B, C, D etc.) in no particular order. The call to sort puts them in alphabetic order just to be tidy and present them in the same order as in your question. –  Borodin Jun 13 '12 at 18:06
    
Your problem may be the one I saw with multiple source nodes. Check $graph->source_vertices to see how many there are. What problem are you having? –  Borodin Jun 13 '12 at 18:07
    
:I just put two arrays in the problem specification, and the solution doesn't work for them. There maybe a solution through first doing $g->topological_sort(), and then use this result and the original \@data array...maybe... –  Moni Jun 13 '12 at 18:59

All you have to do is find the root nodes, then do a breadth-first traversal.

my %graph = map { my ($name, @children) = @$_; $name => \@children } (
    [qw( A C )],
    [qw( B C )],
    [qw( D F G )],
    [qw( C E D )],
    [qw( E J X I )],
    [qw( I J )]
);

my %non_roots = map { $_ => 1 } map @$_, values(%graph);
my @roots = grep !$non_roots{$_}, keys(%graph);

my %results;
my @todo = map [ $_ => 1 ], @roots;
while (@todo) {
   my ($name, $depth) = @{ shift(@todo) };
   next if $results{$name};

   $results{$name} = $depth;
   push @todo, map [ $_ => $depth+1 ], @{ $graph{$name} }
      if $graph{$name};
}

my @names  = sort { $results{$a} <=> $results{$b} || $a cmp $b } keys(%results);
my @depths = @results{@names};
print "@names\n@depths\n";

Put some effort into it!

share|improve this answer
    
Checked on some data, works fine. Thanks. I need to understand it though, haven't used map too much, need to read what it can do. Thanks again. –  Moni Jun 12 '12 at 18:38
    
Would have accepted both if it was possible. –  Moni Jun 12 '12 at 18:55
    
Going with a module is usually a good idea, so take Borodin's. My point for posting this is that you should have at least tried to answer your own question. There's nothing essential about map that couldn't be done with another type of loop; it's just a bit simpler with map. –  ikegami Jun 12 '12 at 19:17
    
the solution doesn't work for the array I just put in the problem section. Any way to find out what the problem may be. I know, it's much more complex array. –  Moni Jun 13 '12 at 16:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally, I think I have solved the problem of finding correct levels, using Borodin's and ikegami's solutions (thanks guys, highly appreiciate your efforts):

#!/usr/local/perl -w 

use strict;
use warnings;
use Graph::Directed;
use List::Util qw( min max );

# my @data = (
# [ qw/ M A/ ],
# [ qw/ N A X/ ],
# [ qw/ A B C / ],
# [ qw/ B D E F/ ],
# [ qw/ C F G / ], 
# [ qw/ F G / ],
# [ qw/ X C G/ ],
# [ qw/ L A B /],
# [ qw/ Q M D/]
# );

# my @data = (
# [ qw( Z A   )],
# [ qw( B D E ) ],
# [ qw( A B C ) ],    
# [ qw( G A E  )],
# [ qw( L B E )]  
# );

# my @data = (
# [ qw/ M A / ],
# [ qw/ N A X / ],
# [ qw/ A B C / ],
# [ qw/ B D E / ],
# [ qw/ C F G / ], 
# [ qw/ F G / ],
# [ qw/ X C / ]
# );

my @data = (
[ qw/ A M B C/ ],
[ qw/ B D F C/ ],
[ qw/ D G/ ],
[ qw/ F G/ ],
[ qw/ C G/ ],
[ qw/ M G/ ],  
);


sub createGraph{
my @data = @{$_[0]};
my $graph = Graph->new(directed => 1);

foreach (@data) {
  my ($parent, @children) = @$_;
  $graph->add_edge($parent, $_) for @children;
}

my @cycleFound = $graph->find_a_cycle;    
print "$_\n" for (@cycleFound);
$graph->is_dag() or die("Graph has cycles - unable to sort\n");
$graph->is_weakly_connected() or die "Graph not weakly connected - unable to analyze\n";  
return $graph;
}

sub getLevels{
my @data = @{$_[0]};
my $graph = createGraph \@data;

my @artifacts = $graph->topological_sort();
chomp @artifacts; 
print "--------------------------\n";
print "Topologically sorted list: \n";
print "$_ " for @artifacts;        
print "\n--------------------------\n";

print "Initial levels (longest path):\n";
my @sources = $graph->source_vertices;
my %max_levels = map { $_=>[]} @artifacts;
my @levels = ();
for my $vertex (@artifacts) {
    my $path = 0;
    foreach(@sources){
        if(defined($graph->path_length($_, $vertex))){
            if ($graph->path_length($_, $vertex) > $path){
                $path = $graph->path_length($_, $vertex)
            }
        }
    }
 printf "%s - %d\n", $vertex, $path;
 push @levels, $path;
 push @{$max_levels{$vertex}}, $path;
}
print "--------------------------\n";

for (my $i = 0; $i < @levels; $i++){ 
my $parent_level = $levels[$i];
my $parent = $artifacts[$i];                
    for (my $j = $i+1; $j < @levels; $j++){ 
        my $child = $artifacts[$j];
        for (@data){
            my ($p, @c) = @{$_};
            if($parent eq $p){
                my @matches = grep(/$child/, @c);
                if(scalar(@matches) != 0){
                    $levels[$j]  = 1 + $parent_level;
                    push @{$max_levels{$child}},$levels[$j];
                    $levels[$j] = max @{$max_levels{$child}};
                }
            }
        }
    }            
}
print "Final levels:\n";
my %sorted = ();
for (my $i = 0; $i < @levels; $i++){
    $sorted{$artifacts[$i]} = $levels[$i];
}
my @orderedList = sort { $sorted{$a} <=> $sorted{$b} } keys %sorted;
print "$sorted{$_} $_\n" for @orderedList;
print "--------------------------\n";   
return  \%max_levels;
}

getLevels \@data;

Output:

    --------------------------
    Topologically sorted list:
    A M B D C F G
    --------------------------
    Initial levels (longest path):
    A - 0
    M - 1
    B - 1
    D - 2
    C - 1
    F - 2
    G - 2
    --------------------------
    Final levels:
    0 A
    1 M
    1 B
    2 F
    2 C
    2 D
    3 G
    --------------------------
share|improve this answer
    
@Borodin: thank for great help. –  Moni Jun 17 '12 at 15:02
    
@ikegami: thanks for great help. –  Moni Jun 17 '12 at 15:02
    
I'm still looking at your solution, but at first glance it seems to generate a different result for your original case from the one you posted, where I and J were both put on level 4. –  Borodin Jun 19 '12 at 7:50
    
@Borodin: That was a mistake. I have corrected the the output I posted. –  Moni Jun 20 '12 at 9:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.