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I want to create a cms that writes out flat html files, so no database involvement.

The idea is the CMS will allow files to be edited and updated (written in php and can make use of a mysql database if needed), then save/write out these changes to an html file, rather than having a php site that relies on mysql calls to get data.

My questions; does something like this already exist? Am I making things more difficult for myself by doing it this way?

THanks :)

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I think you are making things more difficult for yourself, It is possible but it's probably not the best solution to your problem. –  Frank_Hemsworth Jun 12 '12 at 15:17
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Ok, so you want a cms that writes out html files with no database involvement, but it can make use of MySQL? Ummmmm......... –  bpeterson76 Jun 12 '12 at 15:34
    
Yes. The CMS can use mysql, but the final website won't. For example www.mysite.com/cms/ will use a php/mysql combo, where as www.mysite.com will just use flat files like index.html and about.html –  GT22 Jun 12 '12 at 15:37
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Barebones CMS sounds like it might fit the bill:

http://barebonescms.com/

It doesn't use MySQL and its built-in caching system outputs static HTML files. It uses a little PHP to bootstrap the cache but that can, depending on the website, be completely bypassed using some web server rules (e.g. .htaccess) or just push the static files to the right locations on a production box and rename them (requires using a subdirectory for every page).

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Just do a google search for no database cms and many options come up. There is one called gpEasy that may fit your needs. I would not suggest rewriting something that already exists

Here is a nice blog on no database cms's

If you are already making use of the database for the files, what is the problem with using something like wordpress? Also If you just dont like wordpress and this is a site just for you, Why not use a program on your computer to create the site then upload the site to your server?

If you really would like to make your own cms though, my Suggesting would be take a look at one of the already developed and either modify it to fit your needs better or look at it and create your own. This will give you a very good reference while creating your own because you have an already working one.

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Well firstly, I'm learning php/mysql so would like a little challenge :) but second, I'd like other people to access and update the site (it's our teams website, so it would be great to give them something they could use year after year!) :) –  GT22 Jun 12 '12 at 15:29
    
Check out my updates. I would still say to use something like wordpress as this will give you your challenge while still being easy to modify it and create your own modules/adons. this will also allow you to let your team update it year after year. –  bretterer Jun 12 '12 at 15:32
    
At the danger of getting into a preference war, Wordpress really is a blog modified to be a CMS. There's purpose built options out there if you're determined to use packages. Concrete5 comes to mind. –  bpeterson76 Jun 12 '12 at 15:37
    
I'd rather not use any package. I'd like to make this myself from scratch. –  GT22 Jun 12 '12 at 15:38
    
Oh of course there are other CMS options out there. Im not saying anything that "Wordpress is the only option" out there. There are many great options out there and it really depends on your preference. I would just say that If you are learning php/mysql, I would use some CMS option first and then after looking at that code, try and create your own. Im just giving you what I did when I had the same question as you about if I should create my own or use one already made. I looked at the options and the code and then made my own from there. Since ive returned to wordpress and scrapped mine –  bretterer Jun 12 '12 at 15:39
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What is the need for a CMS that writes static html pages?

If it is for performance issues, you could still make a "regular" CMS and cache the output as html files.

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Yeah I've read lots about performance as well as security, although it's not really applicable to my little website I also thought it would be fun and a great project to learn on. –  GT22 Jun 12 '12 at 16:19
    
This isn't an answer to the OP's question. And there is a definite need for a CMS product that is specifically designed for creating small, static sites with just a few pages. –  CubicleSoft Jun 14 '12 at 13:24
    
He wants to create a CMS that generates static html pages. I just stated that he could do the code regularly (just as he would do for a dynamic CMS) and then cache the outputs as HTML files. –  Igor Azevedo Jun 14 '12 at 15:03
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I'm a she... fyi :) –  GT22 Jun 15 '12 at 11:34
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$gem install middleman

Middleman is a command-line tool for creating static websites using all the shortcuts and tools of the modern web development environment.

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you can also try made the full site in local using your prefered cms or other, and finally made a pass on it with httrack or any equivalent program to grab a static version

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