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I have two classes Foo and Bar that Bar extends Foo as below:

class Foo {
    protected 
        $options = array(), 
        $defaults = array(1, 2);

    public function __construct($options){
        array_push($this->options, $this->defaults);
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    protected $defaults = array(3, 4);

    public function print(){
        print_r($this->$options);
    }
}

$bar = new Bar();
$bar->print();

i thought that result should be array(1,2,3,4) but is array(3,4).
how to solve that ?

edit
i don't want Bar class to have constructor because i'm just implementer of superclass and don't know what really will happen in child class.

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You are just pushing elements to $options in Foo's constructor but you are instanciating Bar. That wont call Foo's constructor. So what you get is right. –  Broncha Jun 12 '12 at 16:08
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a couple of solutions, the simplest would be a second variable to be used as an extended defaults, then merge the arrays.

class Foo {
    protected
        $options = array(),
        $original_defaults = array(1, 2),
        $extended_defaults = array();

    public function __construct($options){
        array_merge($this->extended_defaults, $this->original_defaults);
        array_push($this->options, $this->original_defaults);
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    protected $extended_defaults = array(3, 4);

    public function print(){
        print_r($this->$options);
    }
}

$bar = new Bar();
$bar->print();
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That could solve the problem, just i don't want Bar class to have constructor –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:13
    
@OmidAmraei: Refactored. –  Second Rikudo Jun 12 '12 at 16:14
    
Good, but the problem is that this solution just work for two level inheritance. –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:16
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Why would it combine your arrays?

You set $defaults to (1,2) and then to (3,4) - nowhere are you concatenating them.

Your constructor adds (1,2) onto $options. That's all it does.

Your print method outputs $defaults which at this point would be (3,4) because you initialise them as a protected var.

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I know what happens here, just want the parent class to append it's values to it's child class $options. do you have any suggestion ? –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:11
    
Add a constructor to Bar containing the same code as Foo's __constructor - Foo's constructor will add (1,2) to $options - then Bar's constructor would add (3,4) (possibly. I can't vouch for that - I can't exactly remember where in object construction the initialisation of member variables happens - personally I would initialise $defaults in each constructor just so you have more clarity of when things occur.) Just out of interest, why do you need this behaviour - it seems a complicated way of just adding elements to an array? –  deanWombourne Jun 12 '12 at 16:15
    
as i mentioned in update, i don't want Bar class to have constructor –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:18
    
Why don't you want a constructor for an object - that seems like a very odd restriction! –  deanWombourne Jun 12 '12 at 16:19
    
absolutely is not odd, in a modular program there is no warranty that plugin writer implements constructor or not. –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:22
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If you don't want those values to be overridden then use private instead of protected. This will prevent subclasses from overriding those values.

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I just want each child class could have it's default values. if i make $defaults private, then i can't initial int in child class –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:05
    
if i make it private Foo class only has access to its $defaults property –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:09
    
Oh I see, I've removed my answer, because Truth has already posted one and in such a case I'd do something similar. –  walkhard Jun 12 '12 at 16:10
    
@Omid Amraei: "I just want each child class could have it's default values" Its a good idea, but, you forgot to added to the question ;-) –  umlcat Jun 12 '12 at 17:26
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First- You cannot have a method named print. print is a language construct and cannot be overridden.

Second- you should make the default values for a class private, and override them in child classes. Then you can combine them in the parent when you call the constructor. It's not 100% clear what you're trying to accomplish, but the following will merge the sub-class' default options with the superclass':

Updated to remove constructor

abstract class Foo {
    protected $options = array();

    private $defaults = array(1, 2);

   // Implementations of this class MUST define this method
   abstract function overrideDefaults(); 

    public function __construct($options = array()){
        // Merge any incoming options with the default options
        $this->options = array_merge($this->defaults, $options);

    }

    // Concrete children can use this method to modify the current options by 
    // passing in their own defaults.
    protected function modifyDefaults( $defaults ) {
        $this->options= array_merge( $this->defaults, $defaults );
    }

    public function printOps(){
        print_r($this->options);
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    private $defaults = array(3, 4);

    public function overrideDefaults() {
        parent::modifyDefaults( $this->defaults );
    }
}

$bar = new Bar();
$bar->overrideDefaults();
$bar->printOps();

Notice I also moved the now printOps method to the superclass. Output:

Array ( [0] => 1 [1] => 2 [2] => 3 [3] => 4 ) 
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But you implemented the constructor in child class, think i'm just writer of super class. –  Omid Jun 12 '12 at 16:27
    
If you want the child class to be able to pass data to the super class, then the child class either MUST implement a constructor, or you can make the superclass abstract and force concrete implementations to define a method to pass that data. –  watcher Jun 12 '12 at 17:34
    
abstraction seems to be a good idea, i'm looking for a solution to not force child classes to do anything special like implementing a baffler function. –  Omid Jun 13 '12 at 6:27
    
@OmidAmraei like I said earlier, if you want the child class to be able to pass information to its parent, there has to be a way for it to do so (some kind of method, whether it be a constructor or not) –  watcher Jun 13 '12 at 12:10
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"I just want each child class could have it's default values".

You want to have specific data for each class.

You can use "static fields", make class act as a variable, by itself. Im not very fan of "static members", but I think, it applies to your "use case".

class Foo {
    private 
      // (1) "private" only accessed by the class itself,
      // neither external code, or subclasses,
      // (2) "static", specific to the class,
      static $defaults = array(1, 2);

    protected 
      // want to be accessed only by class & subclasses
      $options = array();

    // when using "static fields" in constructor,
    // you need to override constructor
    public function __construct($options){
        array_push($this->options, Foo::$defaults);
    }

    // ops, "print" is reserved identifier
    // public function print(){

    public function display_options() {
        print_r($this->$options);
    }

    public function display_defaultoptions() {
      // in order to acccess "static fields",
      // you use the class id, followed by double colon,
      // not "$this->*"
      print_r(Foo::$defaults);
    }
} // class Foo

class Bar extends Foo {
private 
    // (1) "private" only accessed by the class itself,
    // neither external code, or subclasses,
    // (2) "static", specific to the class,
    static $defaults = array(1, 2);

    // when using "static fields" in constructor,
    // you need to override constructor
    public function __construct($options){
        array_push($this->options, Bar::$defaults);
    }

    public function display_defaultoptions() {
      // in order to acccess "static fields",
      // you use the class id, followed by double colon
      // not "$this->*"
      print_r(Bar::$defaults);
    }
} // class Bar

$bar = new Bar();
$bar->print();

Cheers

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1  
OP is requesting a childclass ('Bar') without a constructor. –  watcher Jun 12 '12 at 17:47
    
@watcher, Yes, I know. I working how to make around this, due to "static fields". Thanks. –  umlcat Jun 12 '12 at 17:55
    
Sorry but you just intricated the @watcher solution –  Omid Jun 13 '12 at 6:32
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