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i'm using the code below to delete the files that are more than 10 days old. Is there a simpler/smarter way of doing this?

string source_path = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["source_path"];
            string filename= ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["filename"];

            var fileQuery= from file in Directory.GetFiles(source_path,filename,SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
                           where File.GetCreationTime(file)<System.DateTime.Now.AddDays(-10)
                           select file;

            foreach(var f in fileQuery)
            {
                File.Delete(f);
            }
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2 Answers 2

Well there are two things I'd change:

  • Determine the cut-off DateTime once, rather than re-evaluating DateTime.Now repeatedly
  • I wouldn't use a query expression when you've just got a where clause:

So I'd rewrite the query part as:

var cutoff = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-10);
var query = Directory.GetFiles(sourcePath, filename, SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
                     .Where(f => File.GetCreationTime(f) < cutoff);

Another alternative would be to use DirectoryInfo and FileInfo:

var cutoff = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-10);
var path = new DirectoryInfo(sourcePath);
var query = path.GetFiles(filename, SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
                .Where(fi => fi.CreationTime < cutoff);

(In .NET 4 you might also want to use EnumerateFiles instead.)

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1  
Definitely would recommend DirectoryInfo.EnumerateFiles if you're using .NET 4 - if there are a lot of files, it can make a noticeable difference. –  Reed Copsey Jun 12 '12 at 16:52
    
Thank you so much Jon. –  Vivek Chandraprakash Jun 12 '12 at 16:53

It is possible to do a LINQ "one-liner" to perform this process:

Directory.GetFiles(source_path,filename,SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
.Where(f => File.GetCreationTime(file) < System.DateTime.Now.AddDays(-10))
.All(f => {File.Delete(f); return true;);

Don't forget to wrap the code in a try catch.

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3  
Using Enumerable.All this way is not something I'd ever recommend. Purposefully writing side effects into a query operator is fairly ugly, IMO. –  Reed Copsey Jun 12 '12 at 16:50
    
Thanks Shai.... –  Vivek Chandraprakash Jun 12 '12 at 16:54
    
@ReedCopsey: Fair enough. I was going to write a caveat about how it is possible but not recommended, but I ended up not doing that. I guess I deserve the downvote :). –  Shai Cohen Jun 12 '12 at 17:02

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