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In this problem, I have three (identically-structured) lists. Two have all numbers and the other is filled with nil. I'm trying to replace the corresponding value in the empty list with the addition of the corresponding values from the two lists. What I have so far utilizes a loop and uses setf to replace the value.

(defun add-two-lists (list1 list2 list3)
   (loop for a in list1
        for b in list2
        for c in list3 do
        (setf c (+ a b))))

The problem is that this function is not being destructive. How do I make this function destructive?


Ok, I am aware I could use an apply to do this, but for future or tangent purposes, is there a way to use a loop to do the same thing?


I've decided to resort to my penultimate solution; use the list-length to transverse the lists.

(defun add-two-lists (list1 list2 list3)
       (loop for x from 0 to (- (list-length list1) 1) do
            (setf (nth x list3) (+ (nth x list1) (nth x list2))))
       (values list3))
share|improve this question
3  
My favorite method to make a destructive function: I fill it with visions of grandeur, convince it to release it's anger, letting hate flow through it. It usually works, unless there's a child function that brings it back to the light side. –  SomeKittens Jun 12 '12 at 16:46
2  
using NTH is the worst possible way. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 12 '12 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yet another way to do the same thing without using a loop (though it's conceptually similar)

(defun add-two-lists (a b c &optional (d c))
  (if a
    (add-two-lists
     (cdr a) (cdr b)
     (cdr (rplaca c (+ (car a) (car b)))) d) d))

(add-two-lists '(1 2 3 4 5) '(1 2 3 4 5) '(nil nil nil nil nil))

EDIT

(defun add-two-lists (a b c &optional (d c))
  (if a
    (add-two-lists
     (cdr a) (cdr b)
     (cdr (rplaca c (+ (car a) (car b)))) d) d))

(time
 (dotimes (i 1e6)
   (add-two-lists '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(nil nil nil nil nil))))

;; Evaluation took:
;;   0.077 seconds of real time
;;   0.076004 seconds of total run time (0.076004 user, 0.000000 system)
;;   98.70% CPU
;;   214,723,476 processor cycles
;;   0 bytes consed

(defun add-two-lists-1 (list1 list2 list3)
  (loop for a in list1
     for b in list2
     for c on list3 do
       (rplaca c (+ a b))))

(time
 (dotimes (i 1e6)
   (add-two-lists-1 '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(nil nil nil nil nil))))

;; Evaluation took:
;;   0.060 seconds of real time
;;   0.060004 seconds of total run time (0.060004 user, 0.000000 system)
;;   100.00% CPU
;;   169,395,444 processor cycles
;;   0 bytes consed

EDIT 2

But notice the optimized version behavior. Possibly, again, YMMV, but this is what I get on 64-bit Debian with SBCL.

(defun add-two-lists (a b c &optional (d c))
  (declare (optimize (speed 3) (safety 0)))
  (declare (type list a b c d))
  (if a
    (add-two-lists
     (cdr a) (cdr b)
     (cdr (rplaca
       c 
       (the fixnum
         (+ (the fixnum (car a))
        (the fixnum (car b)))))) d) d))

(time
 (dotimes (i 1e6)
   (add-two-lists '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(nil nil nil nil nil))))

;; Evaluation took:
;;   0.041 seconds of real time
;;   0.040002 seconds of total run time (0.040002 user, 0.000000 system)
;;   97.56% CPU
;;   114,176,175 processor cycles
;;   0 bytes consed

(defun add-two-lists-1 (list1 list2 list3)
  (declare (optimize (speed 3) (safety 0)))
  (loop for a fixnum in list1
     for b fixnum in list2
     for c cons on list3 do
       (rplaca c (the fixnum (+ a b)))))

(time
 (dotimes (i 1e6)
   (add-two-lists-1 '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(1 2 3 4 5)
          '(nil nil nil nil nil))))

;; Evaluation took:
;;   0.040 seconds of real time
;;   0.040003 seconds of total run time (0.040003 user, 0.000000 system)
;;   100.00% CPU
;;   112,032,123 processor cycles
;;   0 bytes consed
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of this recursive solution as a last resort. I'm worried about speed in this case so I'm hesitant to choose a recursive solution over a (possible, yet-to-be found) iterative solution. –  Zchpyvr Jun 12 '12 at 17:24
    
Hmm, I guess there is little difference in time. For comparison, do you know if the updated code is slower or faster than your functions? –  Zchpyvr Jun 12 '12 at 18:52
1  
There is little need to add types to the code. Most list handling is 'fast enough' if you do it right. Also note that in most Lisp compilers this will generate unsafe code with SAFETY = 0. That's very bad. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 12 '12 at 20:26

Here's one way:

(defun add-two-lists (list1 list2 list3)
   (loop for a in list1
        for b in list2
        for c on list3 do
        (rplaca c (+ a b)))

ADDENDUM

Here's another way that uses map instead of loop:

(defun add-two-lists (list1 list2 list3)
  (mapl #'(lambda (cl al bl) (rplaca cl (+ (car al) (car bl))))
    list3 list1 list2))
share|improve this answer
    
is rplaca part of common lisp? and how is it different from setf? –  Zchpyvr Jun 12 '12 at 16:57
    
Yes, rplaca is part of Common Lisp (setf uses rplaca when the place it is modifying is the car of a cons): lispworks.com/documentation/lw51/CLHS/Body/f_rplaca.htm -- you could say (setf (car c) ...) instead of (rplaca c ...) –  Doug Currie Jun 12 '12 at 17:13
    
Thanks, @wvwvw ! –  Doug Currie Jun 12 '12 at 17:30

Common Lisp provides a function for that: MAP-INTO.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, map-into doesn't work with nested lists, which are what I am dealing with. (I know that my code above doesn't regard nested lists, but I have it extended into a recursive function on my file) If you know someway I could utilize map-into to nested lists, please show me. –  Zchpyvr Jun 13 '12 at 2:11

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