Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a pretty simple trigger:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_log_datei()
RETURNS TRIGGER AS $$
BEGIN
  INSERT INTO logs (aktion, tabelle, benutzer_id) VALUES(TG_OP, 'dateien', NEW.benutzer_id);
END; $$ LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

CREATE TRIGGER log_datei AFTER INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE
ON dateien
FOR EACH STATEMENT
EXECUTE PROCEDURE f_log_datei();

My table logs is the following:

CREATE TABLE logs(
    id int PRIMARY KEY DEFAULT NEXTVAL('logs_id_seq'),
    zeit timestamp DEFAULT now(),
    aktion char(6),
    tabelle varchar(32),
    alt varchar(256),
    neu varchar(256),
    benutzer_id int references benutzer(id)
);

After inserting something in dateien I get the following error:

ERROR:  record "new" is not assigned yet
DETAIL:  The tuple structure of a not-yet-assigned record is indeterminate.
CONTEXT:  SQL statement "INSERT INTO logs (aktion, tabelle, benutzer_id) VALUES(TG_OP, 'dateien', NEW.benutzer_id)"
PL/pgSQL function "f_log_datei" line 3 at SQL statement

Why di I get this error? Then I look into the documentation it seems they use new in the same way I do.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

From the fine manual:

36.1. Overview of Trigger Behavior
[...]
For a row-level trigger, the input data also includes the NEW row for INSERT and UPDATE triggers, and/or the OLD row for UPDATE and DELETE triggers. Statement-level triggers do not currently have any way to examine the individual row(s) modified by the statement.

And from Trigger Procedures:

NEW
Data type RECORD; variable holding the new database row for INSERT/UPDATE operations in row-level triggers. This variable is NULL in statement-level triggers and for DELETE operations.

Note what it says about row-level triggers and statement-level triggers.

You have a statement-level trigger:

...
FOR EACH STATEMENT
EXECUTE PROCEDURE f_log_datei();

Statement-level triggers are triggered once per statement and a statement can apply to multiple rows so the notion of affected row (which is what NEW and OLD are about) simply doesn't apply.

If you want to use NEW (or OLD) in a trigger then you want the trigger to execute for each affected row and that means you want a row-level trigger:

CREATE TRIGGER log_datei AFTER INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE
ON dateien
FOR EACH ROW
EXECUTE PROCEDURE f_log_datei();

I just changed FOR EACH STATEMENT to FOR EACH ROW.


Your trigger should also be returning something:

A trigger function must return either NULL or a record/row value having exactly the structure of the table the trigger was fired for.
[...]
The return value of a row-level trigger fired AFTER or a statement-level trigger fired BEFORE or AFTER is always ignored; it might as well be null. However, any of these types of triggers might still abort the entire operation by raising an error.

So you should RETURN NEW; or RETURN NULL; in your trigger. You have an AFTER trigger so it doesn't matter which RETURN you use but I'd go with RETURN NEW;.

share|improve this answer
2  
Did you also add RETURN NEW; to the end of the function? –  kgrittn Jun 12 '12 at 17:42
    
@kgrittn: That would be the next bug, no? But yeah, I didn't even see that and it is worth mentioning while we're here. –  mu is too short Jun 12 '12 at 18:09
    
yeah I've added the RETURN statement :) –  soupdiver Jun 13 '12 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.