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So the base project is this...

I am trying to write a server application that will download and hash files off of a website.

The reason for this is so that I can blacklist particular files that are re-uploaded under different names or provide further descriptions as to what a file really is. These files are 0.1KB - 10.00MB and many. If I could detect within a reasonable ballpark figure a file is already hashed I could return the hash rather then download the entire file and send the results.

My temporary solution is a JavaScript add-on that does it on the spot. This causes temporary freezes and is too redundant for my liking. My goal is to make this good enough to share with the public; The current method is far from.

My skill set in programming is very wide yet not professional or polished in any individual so a library or examples are highly appreciated.


A snip-it of my java-script code is this...

    $('.tablesorter tbody tr').each(function(index) {
        var href = 'http:' + $(this).find("td a:eq(0)").attr('href');
        var MD5  = "";
        $.get(href, function(data) {
            MD5 = calcMD5(data);
            $(".tablesorter tbody tr:eq("+index+") td:eq(3)").text(MD5); 
         });
    });

This works great, does what it needs to. However I'd like to have a server do this so that a file only needs to be hashed a single time.

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1  
Interesting. Can you give some examples to make it more clear what it is you're trying to achieve? Also, please share the javascript solution, or relevant parts of it. It will help us understand better. –  Jonathan M Jun 12 '12 at 17:01
1  
Might be a better fit to post the JavaScript code at codereview.stackexchange.com for pointers on making it not freeze. –  epascarello Jun 12 '12 at 17:03
    
I am trying to write a server application that will download and hash files off of a website. Before the file is uploaded? You control the sever side scripting? My temporary solution is a JavaScript add-on that does it on the spot. This is the classic way if you control the server side: run a client-side hash and just upload that before you accept the upload. Maybe you should continue to work the kinks out of that? I think you need more detail here. –  the wolf Jun 12 '12 at 17:12
    
Jonathan, the website, though reluctant to say is "boards.4chan.org/f/";. I generally enjoy the loops and random flashes. I do not enjoy the pornography or the troll's uploads. I'm making a grease-monkey script that will allow table sorting, black listing, and general re-formatting. –  DeusAphor Jun 12 '12 at 17:14
    
Thank you for your reply carrot-top. I think you misunderstood and that was due to my lack of explanation. I hope that my previous message explains a bit more. –  DeusAphor Jun 12 '12 at 17:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that your problem is that you want to minimize the amount of bandwidth used, you could limit the amount of data downloaded to, say, the first 100kb and build your hash over that part. Other information you could use is anything sent in the header by the server, for example the total filesize and the MIME-filetype.

Obviously this won't work if the files you are expecting to look at differ at parts later in the file. But it should work with images or other compressed file formats.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply Niko. This sounds about what I am trying to do. The file type is compiled flash files. If I understand you correctly there is a way I can download just a section of the file, build the hash and save it along with the entire files hash. Would this small section be able to uniquely identify the file? –  DeusAphor Jun 12 '12 at 17:19
    
+1 Yes -- this works in most cases. I use the same method to ID dup JPEG files. Read the first 80KB of multi mega byte files. While in theory the first 80KB of a 4MB files is the same, it is rare for compressed binary data. –  the wolf Jun 12 '12 at 17:46

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