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I have this:

(gc "$env:a.txt") -replace 'aaa', 'bbb'

I want to pipe it someway so it'll print the lines that were changed (after the change), and only them (without simply searching for 'bbb', of course..). How ?

Edit:

I forgot to mention that I want to change the file in the process, which makes it harder (but I want to see, as a "sanity feedback", only the updated lines):

(gc "a.txt") -replace 'aaa', 'bbb' | something-here-?? | sc a.txt

Do I have to do that in two steps or there's a way to pipe them all ?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For what you want, to show what is being changed and replace content of file, you can do:

gc test.txt | %{ 
    if($_ -match "this") {
        $replaced = $_ -replace "this","that"
        write-host $replaced
        $replaced
    } else{
        $_
    }

} | sc test2.txt

If you just want to see diff after replacing, you can use compare-object

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You are missing one line on that - it will not copy the matched lines into the test2.txt file. If you edit your code to have "$replaced" alone on a line after the "write-host $replaced" line, I think that'll be what you meant. –  Levin Magruder Jun 13 '12 at 4:42
    
@LevinMagruder - Oh yeah, that is what I meant. –  manojlds Jun 13 '12 at 5:52
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You can first match against the text that you want replaced, then do the replace line by line...

(gc a.txt) -match 'aaa' | % { $_ -replace 'aaa', 'bbb' }

I also want to point out that your code, and mine which is derived from yours, does not actually modify the original file.

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I forgot to mention that I want to change the file in the process, which makes it harder (but I want to see, as a "sanity feedback", only the updated lines): (gc "a.txt") -replace 'aaa', 'bbb' | something-here-?? | sc a.txt. I edited my question accordingly.. –  Tal Jun 12 '12 at 17:56
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I don't see any reason not to use seth's method but in case there's something subtle, or iif you just enjoy typing: there's a built-in diff. To get just the changed veersion of the lines that changed:

  diff (gc myfile) ((gc myfile) -replace "x", "y")) |  % { if ($_.SideIndicator -eq '=>') { $_.InputObject } }

(you could get both orig and changed by removing the test for SideIndicator)

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I forgot to mention that I want to change the file in the process, which makes it harder (but I want to see, as a "sanity feedback", only the updated lines): (gc "a.txt") -replace 'aaa', 'bbb' | something-here-?? | sc a.txt. I edited my question accordingly.. In that case, I guess the diff is a good option, if I don't find more efficient way (or maybe do it in two steps) –  Tal Jun 12 '12 at 17:58
    
Actually, Compare-Object has -PassThru parameter, so no need to pipe things around to get it to work...: diff (gc myfile) ((gc myfile) -replace 'x','y') -PassThru –  BartekB Jun 13 '12 at 8:02
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You could use ForEach-Object to check each replaced value for the new value and write it out. Just make sure to continue passing everything down the pipeline:

(Get-Content "a.txt") -replace 'aaa', 'bbb' | 
    ForEach-Object { if( $_ -like '*bbb*' ) { Write-Host $_ } $_ } | 
    Set-Content a.txt

It will show any line that already contains bbb. If you truly just want to see before and after:

Get-Content "a.txt" | 
    ForEach-Object {
         if( $_ -match 'aaa' ) 
         {
             $newLine = $_ -replace 'aaa','bbb'
             Write-Host "> $_"
             Write-Host "< $newLine"
             $newLine
         }
         else
         {
             $_
         }

    } |
    Set-Content a.txt
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