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I'm trying to update a piece of code so that it simulates modal dialogs and Reactive Extensions felt like a proper tool to do so, but I can't make it work.

Currently, the code looks something like this:

public bool ShowConfirmationDialogs(IEnumerable<ItemType> items)
{
    bool canContinue = true;

    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        Dialog dialog = new Dialog();
        dialog.Prepare(item);   // Prepares a "dialog" specific to each item

        IObservable<bool> o = Service.ShowDialog(dialog, result =>
        {
             // do stuff with result that may impact next iteration, e.g.
             canContinue = !result.Condition;
        });

        // tried using the following line to wait for observable to complete
        // but it blocks the UI thread
        o.FirstOrDefault();

        if (!canContinue)
            break;
    }

    if (!canContinue)
    {
        // do something that changes current object's state
    }

    return canContinue;
}

Up until now, the code from the lambda expression was used to do stuff when the "dialog" shown by ShowDialog was closed. The call to ShowDialog is non blocking and used to return void.

What happens behind the scenes in ShowDialog is that an object is added to an ObservableCollection so that it is shown on the screen.

I modified ShowDialog so that it will return an IObservable<bool> who calls OnCompleted of its subscribers when the dialog is closed. This works. I tested it with the following code:

o.Subscribe(b => Console.WriteLine(b), () => Console.WriteLine("Completed"));

And I can see the string "Completed" when the dialog is closed. My problem is that the line above is non-blocking, so I can potentially display several dialogs, which I don't want to do.

I tried the following:

o.FirstOrDefault();

assuming that the program would wait there until the observable sent something or completed. The program blocks all right, but it also freezes the UI, which means I never see my dialog, which I can never close, so the observable never completes.

I tried several variations using ObserveOn and SubscribeOn to try to leave the UI thread do its work, with no luck. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated, my main goal being to keep the code looking sequential, kind of like when using Window.ShowDialog.

To summarize: (and to answer Chris in the comments)

The problem is that ShowDialog is non-blocking and, as stated above, the expected behavior is the same as when using Window.ShowDialog. Right now, I can either not block—but then the loop continues and I get several dialogs—or I can block (with FirstOrDefault), but it also blocks the UI, which prevents me from closing the dialog in order to complete the observable.

More explanations: (for Enigmativity)

When I call ShowDialog a control is displayed that is modal—in the sense that it blocks the user from accessing the rest of the application—but the call to the method is non-blocking, so execution continues immediately. In my example, this can potentially display several dialogs because of the loop. The method is non-blocking because all it does is add an object to a collection and I can't change this behaviour.

However, hoping to use Rx, I made it so that ShowDialog will return an IObservable. So now the method returns immediately, but I have an object that will call OnCompleted of any observers once the control that was displayed by ShowDialog's actions is closed. I'm using a Subject for this, in case it matters.

What I want now, is to wait for this returned IObservable to complete before moving on, and so simulate a blocking call. FirstOrDefault does the waiting part successfully, but unfortunately, it also blocks the UI thread, preventing the control from actually showing, thus preventing the user from closing it, thus preventing the IObservable from completing.

I know my idea can't be far off, because I can get things to kind of work by closing the dialog automatically after x seconds. All I need now is for the "waiting" part not to block the UI so that the user can close the control instead of a timer.

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So, what's your overall goal? Is it to have a list of dialogs shown sequentially, with the resulting user-choice changing the list of potential dialogs yet to be shown? –  Dave Bish Jun 12 '12 at 17:14
    
That is not my goal per se, but it is a side effect. What I want is simply to wait for the shown dialog to be closed before continuing execution. The loop is not even necessary, but it helps to illustrate why all the code after the dialog closes cannot be put in the callback. –  madd0 Jun 12 '12 at 17:17
    
I'm not sure how you're showing your dialogs - but cannot you just use ShowModal? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c7ykbedk.aspx –  Dave Bish Jun 12 '12 at 17:18
    
I'm not using Windows Forms, but WPF, and I'm not showing windows, just objects that behave like dialog windows. –  madd0 Jun 12 '12 at 17:20
    
Just to be clear, the issue is that ShowDialog is non-blocking, and thus allows you to launch multiple "dialogs" at the same time? –  Chris Jun 12 '12 at 17:22
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2 Answers

Your code is a odd mixture of observable and enumerable sequences. You're also trying to return a bool from a function that is using observables so you're forcing the bad practice of requiring a blocking operation.

You're best to try and make everything stay as observables. This is best practice approach.

Also there is no clear use of each item in the ShowDialog function.

This is the best I can offer at the moment without knowing more. Try this:

public IObservable<bool> ShowConfirmationDialogs(IEnumerable items)
{
    var query =
        from item in items.OfType<SOMEBASETYPE>().ToObservable()
        from result in Service.ShowDialog(item =>
        {
            // do stuff with result that may impact next iteration of foreach
        })
        select new
        {
            Item = item,
            Result = result,
        };

    return query.TakeWhile(x => x.Result == true);
}

The calling code should observe on the UI thread.

Let me know if this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Forget about the returned bool and forget about the loop. All I want is to get an IObservable back from ShowDialog (that's taken care of) and wait for it to complete before going forward, but without freezing the UI. Is this possible? –  madd0 Jun 13 '12 at 6:16
    
@madd0 - So the ShowDialog isn't modal? So you can still work with other forms while the dialog is showing? Can you explain a little more carefully the workflow that you're trying to achieve? –  Enigmativity Jun 13 '12 at 8:41
    
"modality", "forms", etc. are just implementation details. I added further explanations in the question body to hopefully make things clearer. –  madd0 Jun 13 '12 at 10:19
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found a solution to my problem, so I'll share it in case you're interested.

After some refactoring, I renamed the service's method I used in the question and created a new one. It's interface looks like this:

public interface IDialogService
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Displays the specified dialog.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>This method is non-blocking. If you need to access the return value of the dialog, you can either
    /// provide a callback method or subscribe to the <see cref="T:System.IObservable{bool?}" /> that is returned.</remarks>
    /// <param name="dialog">The dialog to display.</param>
    /// <param name="callback">The callback to be called when the dialog closes.</param>
    /// <returns>An <see cref="T:System.IObservable{bool?}" /> that broadcasts the value returned by the dialog
    /// to any observers.</returns>
    IObservable<bool?> Show(Dialog dialog, Action<bool?> callback = null);

    /// <summary>
    /// Displays the specified dialog. This method waits for the dialog to close before it returns.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>This method waits for the dialog to close before it returns. If you need to show a dialog and
    /// return immediately, use <see cref="M:Show"/>.</remarks>
    /// <param name="dialog">The dialog to display.</param>
    /// <returns>The value returned by the dialog.</returns>
    bool? ShowDialog(Dialog dialog);
}

The part that solves my problem is the implementation of ShowDialog:

public bool? ShowDialog(Dialog dialog)
{
    // This will hold the result returned by the dialog
    bool? result = null;

    // We show a dialog using the method that returns an IObservable
    var subject = this.Show(dialog);

    // but we have to wait for it to close on another thread, otherwise we'll block the UI
    // we do this by preparing  a new DispatcherFrame that exits when we get a value
    // back from the dialog
    DispatcherFrame frame = new DispatcherFrame();

    // So start observing on a new thread. The Start method will return immediately.
    new Thread((ThreadStart)(() =>
    {
        // This line will block on the new thread until the subject sends an OnNext or an OnComplete
        result = subject.FirstOrDefault();

        // once we get the result from the dialog, we can tell the frame to stop
        frame.Continue = false;
    })).Start();

    // This gets executed immediately after Thread.Start
    // The Dispatcher will now wait for the frame to stop before continuing
    // but since we are not blocking the current frame, the UI is still responsive
    Dispatcher.PushFrame(frame);

    return result;
}

I think the comments should be enough to understand the code, which I can now use as so:

public bool? ShowConfirmationDialogs(IEnumerable<ItemType> items)
{
    bool canContinue = true;

    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        Dialog dialog = new Dialog();
        dialog.Prepare(item);   // Prepares a "dialog" specific to each item

        bool? result = Service.ShowDialog(dialog);

        canContinue = result.HasValue && result.Value;

        if (!canContinue)
            break;
    }

    if (!canContinue)
    {
        // do something that changes current object's state
    }

    return canContinue;
}

I'd love to hear any comments or alternatives other users may have.

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