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I have been using this little function under gcc/x86 to do fast byte-swapping of int16_t's:

static inline int16_t MySwapInt16t(int16_t val)
{
   __asm__ ("xchgb %b0, %h0" : "=Q" (val) : "0" (val));
   return val;
}

... today while browsing through someone else's code on line, I saw he had a similar function that looks like this:

static inline int16_t HisSwapInt16t(int16_t val)
{
   __asm__ ("xchgb %h0, %b0" : "+Q" (val));
   return val;
}

The differences between my function and his function (AFAICT) are:

  1. He specifies "+Q" instead of "=Q"
  2. The positions of %h0 and %b0 are exchanged
  3. He has no : "0" (val) clause at the end of his function

As far as I can tell, both implementations seem to work correctly, but inline assembly is a bit of a black art to me, so can someone knowledgable explain:

  1. What is the significance of the three differences listed above?
  2. Is one of the two implementations better or faster than the other, or will they both perform equivalently?
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

He specifies "+Q" instead of "=Q"

He has no : "0" (val) clause at the end of his function

The + modifier stands for a both input and output operand, therefore it's no need to add an input list, check the CGG manual about that.

The positions of %h0 and %b0 are exchanged

I guess it doesn't matter since the xchg instruction does a content exchange between the two operands.

Is one of the two implementations better or faster than the other, or will they both perform equivalently?

To find out the best implementation, I would compile both and check with objdump how the compiler wrapped these function since the core function will be the same single instruction.

Hope this help!

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