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Is there a way to set a PATH-like sequence of directories to search for files in vim? My project has C files split across many directories, and it would be nice to jump back and forth without remembering the full path each time.

For instance, if I have:

platform/drivers/uart.c
ui/display/menu.c
cpu/registers/regs.h

I would like to be able to set PATH to "platform/drivers:ui/display:cpu/registers". Then when I want to switch to a file, I can just type:

:e uart.c

instead of

:e platform/drivers/uart.c

I understand that I can change the working directory, but then I have to type

:e ../../ui/display/menu.c

to get to another directory.

Alternatively, is there a better way to navigate a project like this than using :edit?

share|improve this question
    
man ctags and :help tags – William Pursell Jun 13 '12 at 1:00
    
ctags are excellent, and I use them for jumping to symbols. However in this case, I do want to select the file by name. – FazJaxton Jun 13 '12 at 13:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is, and it's called path. The way you use path is with the :find command: :find menu.c would search for menu.c in the directories in path and edit it. There are other commands that use path, like :sfind that opens the found file in a new split. See the documentation of path for details and other commands that use it.

Another thing that may help you find your files is the **-wildcard that can expand to any directory path. For example :edit **/menu.c will look for menu.c in subdirectories, so you don't have remember and type the full path.

share|improve this answer
    
I looked at path, but it doesn't seem to work with :edit. If I am in a different working directory and type :e uart.c, it will create a new uart.c in the current directory, not find the uart.c in the path. However, :e **uart.c seems to do what I want. Thanks! – FazJaxton Jun 13 '12 at 14:02

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