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I really need help with this last part of my program. I need to find a string within a larger string and if found return the start location of the substring. From the directions:

Note that your string location starts from 0 and ends at length -1. If the string is not found, a value of -1 will be returned.

I've started and the following code compiles, I just want to know if this is actually correct. I don't want to get in too over my head but I need some feedback from experts. Am I doing this right? Or at least am I going in the right direction?

const int MyString::Find(const MyString& other)
{
    int start(0);
    int counter(0);
    int end = other.Size;
    int count(0);
    int end1 = Size;
    int nfound = -1;
    char* temp;

    if(other.String[0] != '\0' && other.String[0] != ' ')
    {
        if(other.String[count] == String[counter])
        {
            start = counter;

            for(int i = count; i < end-1;i++)
            {
                for(int j = counter; j < end1 -1; j++)
                {
                    temp[j] = String[j];
                }
            }
            if(other == temp)
            {
                return start;
            }
            else
                return nfound;
        }

        else{
            while(other.String[count] != String[counter])
            {
                counter++;
                if(other.String[count] == String[counter])
                {
                    start = counter;
                    for(int i = count; i < end-1;i++)
                    {
                        for(int j = counter; j < end1 -1; j++)
                        {
                            temp[j] = String[j];
                        }
                    }
                    if(other == temp)
                    {
                        return start;
                    }
                    else
                        return nfound;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return nfound;
    }
}
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closed as too localized by templatetypedef, cdhowie, dirkgently, juanchopanza, zdan Jun 12 '12 at 19:55

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
SO is not a place for people to review your code; you might want to try the Code Review SE site. –  templatetypedef Jun 12 '12 at 18:45
    
Not directly related to the Q: you've got a memory leak: you allocate with new[] (which you don't even need to) but you never delete[]. –  jrok Jun 12 '12 at 18:52
    
@jrok thank you! I have edited the code on account of the leak you have pointed out. –  user1363061 Jun 12 '12 at 19:55
    
Wait wait, you DO need new in this particular code snippet! What I meant was that you don't really need a dynamically allocatted char array to implement a find function. See Steve Jessop's answer. –  jrok Jun 12 '12 at 20:00
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that you don't want to do anything very sophisticated, consider that needle is a substring of haystack if and only if there is some index of haystack for which the substring starting at that index is equal to needle.

Also, you don't need to copy lots of substrings around. Starting from your chosen index, just compare character-by-character until either (a) you find a mismatch, in which case try another index, or (b) you run out of haystack, in which case no match is possible for this or any greater index, or else (c) you run out of needle, in which case you've found a match, so return the index you're working from.

If there's more than one match (for example searching for "na" in "banana"), then hopefully the directions tell you which one to return. This tells you what order to consider the indexes in haystack.

If you do want to do something very sophisticated, look up Boyer-Moore, Knuth-Morris-Pratt, and a number of other published string search algorithms with different trade-offs. It seems to take more than one person to invent a good one.

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thank you! this has helped a lot, now I just have one question: What is the most efficient way to do this if it isn't using loops? Well, 2 questions: I always trip up off of returning the start location because there seems to be no way to retract and get the start location after comparing all characters –  user1363061 Jun 12 '12 at 21:28
    
The most efficient way is not to do it at all -- not yourself. Use a library that's debugged and optimized for your convenience. –  Kuba Ober Jun 13 '12 at 4:11
    
@user1363061: there are a number of ways to get the start location. One would be to store it in a variable while you compare the characters. Another would be to subtract the length of needle from whatever offset in haystack you end up in. The issue of what's most efficient is too complicated to admit a simple answer. Each algorithm has certain inputs (or categories of input) on which it does better or worse. –  Steve Jessop Jun 13 '12 at 9:46
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This is kinda bad code from my point of view. \0 is used in char*-strings to indicate end of the string. There is no need no use it in class that incapsulates strings. There are many algorithms to find substring in string, one of them is Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm. Other are listed in this article String searching algorithm

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"There is no need no use it in class that incapsulates strings" -- and yet, std::string does. Admittedly, that's really just to support the c_str() function. –  Steve Jessop Jun 12 '12 at 18:58
    
I mean, no need to use it explicitly. It makes code less readable. Somethind like if(str.empty()) is much more readable than if(str[0] == '\0') and it will be easier to replace your ANSI-string with Unicode string, for example –  Spo1ler Jun 12 '12 at 21:40
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