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In WinForms, you can know, at any time, the current position of the cursor thanks to the Cursor class.

The same thing doesn't seem to be available for the keyboard. Is it possible to know if, for example, the Shift key is pressed?

Is it absolutely necessary to track down every keyboard notification (KeyDown and KeyUp events)?

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Are you working in a WPF environment or something else? –  epotter Jul 8 '09 at 20:50
48  
@epotter: Second word states WinForms. –  Will Eddins Jul 8 '09 at 21:20

11 Answers 11

up vote 122 down vote accepted
if ((Control.ModifierKeys & Keys.Shift) != 0) 

This will also be true if Ctrl+Shift is down. If you want to check whether Shift alone is pressed,

if (Control.ModifierKeys == Keys.Shift)

If you're in a class that inherits Control (such as a form), you can remove the Control.

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3  
Unless I'm missing something, you haven't answered the question properly. The OP is asking about all keys and used the Shift key as an example only. So how do you detect other keys such as A to Z, 0 to 9 etc. –  Ash Dec 18 '09 at 10:03
1  
Given that he accepted the answer, it appears that he only needed modifier keys. If you want other keys, you'll need to call the GetKeyState API function. –  SLaks Dec 18 '09 at 13:17
    
no need for GetKeyState. You just need to add a message filter. See my answer. –  Ash Jan 23 '10 at 16:33

It's a bit late, but the code below is how to detect almost all currently pressed keys, not just the Shift key.

I noticed most of the other answers don't actually answer the question properly.

private KeyMessageFilter m_filter = new KeyMessageFilter();

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Application.AddMessageFilter(m_filter);

}


public class KeyMessageFilter : IMessageFilter
{
    private Dictionary<Keys, bool> m_keyTable = new Dictionary<Keys, bool>();

    public Dictionary<Keys, bool> KeyTable
    {
        get { return m_keyTable; }
        private set { m_keyTable = value; }
    }

    public bool IsKeyPressed()
    {
        return m_keyPressed; 
    }

    public bool IsKeyPressed(Keys k)
    {
        bool pressed = false;

        if (KeyTable.TryGetValue(k, out pressed))
        {
            return pressed;                  
        }

        return false; 
    }

    private const int WM_KEYDOWN = 0x0100;

    private const int WM_KEYUP = 0x0101;

    private bool m_keyPressed = false;


    public bool PreFilterMessage(ref Message m)
    {
        if (m.Msg == WM_KEYDOWN)
        {
            KeyTable[(Keys)m.WParam] = true;

            m_keyPressed = true;
        }

        if (m.Msg == WM_KEYUP)
        {                
            KeyTable[(Keys)m.WParam] = false;

            m_keyPressed = false;
        }

        return false;
    }
}
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GetKeyState would be more efficient. There's no point in tracking all of the keys when Windows does it for you already. –  SLaks Jan 23 '10 at 23:51
3  
@Slaks, unless you have some benchmark data, you're guessing. Moreover GetKeyState will tell you the state of a key, if you can trap that keyboard event in the first place. My reading of the question is that the OP wants to know how to get the state of a key at any time. So GetKeyState by itself is useless. –  Ash Jan 24 '10 at 3:08
    
Correct. I'm just guessing. –  SLaks Jan 24 '10 at 4:10
    
How exactly would you utilize this to show the keys being pressed? –  Gabriel Ryan Nahmias Nov 11 '13 at 10:55

You can also look at the following if you reference System.Windows.Input

if (Keyboard.Modifiers == ModifierKeys.Shift)

The Keyboard namespace can also be used to check the pressed state of other keys with Keyboard.IsKeyDown(Key), or if you are subscribing to a KeyDownEvent or similar event, the event arguments carry a list of currently pressed keys.

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1  
Actually Keyboard.Modifiers do not always work properly. Had to find the hard way: discoveringdotnet.alexeyev.org/2008/09/… –  Maxim Alexeyev Jul 8 '09 at 20:39
    
Except this is not using Forms modifiers, System.Windows.Input modifiers is a different namespace and has worked fine for us every time. –  Jeff Wain Jul 8 '09 at 21:04

Most of these answers are either far too complicated or don't seem to work for me (e.g. System.Windows.Input doesn't seem to exist). Then I found some sample code which works fine: http://www.switchonthecode.com/tutorials/winforms-accessing-mouse-and-keyboard-state

In case the page disappears in the future I am posting the relevant source code below:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace MouseKeyboardStateTest
{
  public abstract class Keyboard
  {
    [Flags]
    private enum KeyStates
    {
      None = 0,
      Down = 1,
      Toggled = 2
    }

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern short GetKeyState(int keyCode);

    private static KeyStates GetKeyState(Keys key)
    {
      KeyStates state = KeyStates.None;

      short retVal = GetKeyState((int)key);

      //If the high-order bit is 1, the key is down
      //otherwise, it is up.
      if ((retVal & 0x8000) == 0x8000)
        state |= KeyStates.Down;

      //If the low-order bit is 1, the key is toggled.
      if ((retVal & 1) == 1)
        state |= KeyStates.Toggled;

      return state;
    }

    public static bool IsKeyDown(Keys key)
    { 
      return KeyStates.Down == (GetKeyState(key) & KeyStates.Down);
    }

    public static bool IsKeyToggled(Keys key)
    { 
      return KeyStates.Toggled == (GetKeyState(key) & KeyStates.Toggled);
    }
  }
}
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2  
System.Windows.Input exists; for others struggling with this you need to add a reference to PresentationCore, and an additional reference to WindowsBase to access the System.Windows.Input.Key enumeration. This info can always be found on MSDN. –  Alfie May 27 at 12:28

You can P/Invoke down to the Win32 GetAsyncKeyState to test any key on the keyboard. You can pass in values from the Keys enum (e.g. Keys.Shift) to this function, so it only requires a couple of lines of code to add it.

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Keyboard wasn't recognized by the compiler, but GetAsyncKeystate in user32 worked just fine. Thanks! –  Einstein X. Mystery Oct 5 '11 at 19:48
    
@Einstein: Glad to have helped you out :-) –  Jason Williams Oct 5 '11 at 21:45
if ((ModifierKeys == Keys.Control) && ((e.KeyChar & (char)Keys.F) != 0))
{
     // CTRL+F pressed !
}
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helped me a lot. Thanks –  Sangram Aug 6 '12 at 14:45

Since .NET Framework version 3.0, it is possible to use the Keyboard.IsKeyDown method from the new System.Windows.Input namespace. For instance:

if (((Keyboard.IsKeyDown(Key.LeftCtrl) || Keyboard.IsKeyDown(Key.RightCtrl)) && Keyboard.IsKeyDown(Key.F))
{
    // CTRL + F is currently pressed
}

Even though it's part of WPF, that method works fine for WinForm applications (provided that you add references to PresentationCore.dll and WindowsBase.dll). Unfortunately, however, the 3.0 and 3.5 versions of the Keyboard.IsKeyDown method did not work for WinForm applications. Therefore, if you do want to use it in a WinForm application, you'll need to be targeting .NET Framework 4.0 or later in order for it to work.

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just a note, this is for WPF only –  Diego Vieira Apr 4 '13 at 15:45
1  
@DiegoVieira Actually, that's not true. The functionality was added as part of WPF, and it requires that those WPF libraries be referenced, but the Keyboard.IsKeyDown method works, even in a WinForm project. –  Steven Doggart Apr 4 '13 at 16:03
    
Indeed, you have to add PresentationCore.dll –  Diego Vieira Apr 4 '13 at 16:22
1  
Note this doesn't work (in WinForms) if targeting .Net 3.5 or earlier, only 4.0+, due to change in implementation of Win32KeyboardDevice.GetKeyStatesFromSystem(Key) :( –  LMK Oct 7 at 23:05
    
@LMK Nice catch. I tested it myself and verified what you said. I updated my answer to reflect that information. Thanks! –  Steven Doggart Oct 8 at 13:20
if (Control.ModifierKeys == Keys.Shift)
    //Shift is pressed

The cursor x/y position is a property, a keypress (like a mouse click/mousemove) is an event. Best Practice is usually to let the interface be event driven. About the only time you would need the above is if you're trying to do a shift+mouseclick thing.

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The best way I have found to manage keyboard input on a Winform is to process it after the keystroke and before the focused control receives the event. Microsoft maintains a built-in Form-level property named .KeyPreview to facilitate this precise thing:

public frmForm()
{
    // ...
    frmForm.KeyPreview = true;
    // ...
}

Then the form's _KeyDown, _KeyPress, and / or _KeyUp events can be marshaled to access input events before the focused form control ever sees them, and you can apply handler logic to capture the event there or allow it to pass through to the focused form control.

Although not as structurally graceful as XAML's event-routing architecture, it makes management of form-level functions in Winforms far simpler. See the MSDN notes on KeyPreview for caveats.

Best wishes...

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if (Form.ModifierKeys == Keys.Shift)

does work for text box if the above code is in the form's keydown event and no other control captures the keydown event for the key down

also one may wish stop further key processing with: e.Handled = true;

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In WinForms:

if( Form.ModifierKeys == Keys.Shift )

Sounds like a duplicate of this question

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I don't think that wont work if you are in a textbox –  Joe Jul 8 '09 at 20:16
    
He may not care, but I just wanted to pont it out :p –  Joe Jul 8 '09 at 20:17

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