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What the Internal Property in ECMAScript is defined for ? What does the spec mean by

This specification uses various internal properties to define the semantics of object values.These internal properties are not part of the ECMAScript language. They are defined by this specification purely for expository purposes.

Does it mean that Internal properties defined by ECMAScript are not available for programming. They are used in the implementation of the javascript engine ?

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3 Answers

They are used in an example of how to implement a JavaScript engine.

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Does it mean that Internal properties defined by ECMAScript are not available for programming. They are used in the implementation of the javascript engine ?

Yes. They are only for implementation purposes, and don't need "real names". You can read about that in #8.6.2 Object Internal Properties and Methods.

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The often used example is the internal property [[prototype]], all objects have one but you can't access it directly eg.

function foo(){
    this.first = "hi"
    this.second = something
}
foo.prototype = {
    constructor : foo,
    anotherProp : "hello"
}

var obj = new foo();

console.log(obj.anotherProp); //hello
//here the runtime will look in obj for anotherProp and
//fail to find it so it will look in obj's internal property
//[[prototype]] which is pointing to the object foo.prototype

so you can access the objects that the internal property [[prototype]] is pointing to but not directly through the internal [[prototype]] property that is only for the runtime to use, not the programmer.

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