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Why is sum not able to take correct zero value automatically?

>>> sum((['1'], ['2']))

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#13>", line 1, in <module>
    sum((['1'], ['2']))
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'list'
>>> sum((['1'], ['2']), [])
['1', '2']

It is simple to implement like this:

>>> def sum(s, start=None):
    it = iter(s)
    n = next(it)
    if start is None:
        start = type(n)()
    return n + __builtins__.sum(it, start)

>>> sum((['1'], ['2']))
['1', '2']
>>>

But sum does not anyway join strings, so maybe it is just to encourage to use proper methods for different 'summings'.

On the other hand if it is meant to be used only for numbers, why not sum_numbers not sum as name to make it clear.

EDIT: to handle empty sequence we must add little code:

>> sum([])

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#36>", line 1, in <module>
    sum([])
  File "<pyshell#28>", line 3, in sum
    n = next(it)
StopIteration
>>> def sum(s, start=None):
    it = iter(s)
    try:
        n= next(it)
    except:
        return 0

    if start is None:
        start = type(n)()
    return n + __builtins__.sum(it, start)

>>> sum([])
0
>>> 
share|improve this question
    
You aren't really asking a question here; you are suggesting an improvement to a feature in Python. StackOverflow is the wrong place for this. You should make this suggestion on the Python mailing list. Off the top of my head, this seems like a reasonable suggestion; I don't think it can break existing code. –  steveha Jun 12 '12 at 19:40
    
@steveha: This suggestion actually can break existing code, though this code would have to be rather weird. –  Sven Marnach Jun 12 '12 at 19:49
    
@steveha: (However, this backwards incompatibility wouldn't be the reason why this proposal would get shot down on python-ideas. Deducing the result type from the argument types is a questionable design in general, and Guido regularly rejects this kind of thing.) –  Sven Marnach Jun 12 '12 at 19:52
    
Technically shouldn't the return 0 in your definition of sum(), be a return type(n)() if next(it) raises an exception? –  martineau Jun 12 '12 at 20:43
    
@SvenMarnach: Now that you pointed that out, I concur: there is a 0% chance that this will ever be accepted into Python. Explicitly passing a start value isn't so bad (explicit is better than implicit) and unexpected corner cases are enough that the community will reject this, let alone GvR himself. –  steveha Jun 12 '12 at 20:48

1 Answer 1

Inferring the zero value is impossible in the general case. What if the iterable produces instances of a user-defined class that has no zero-argument constructor? And as you've shown, it's easy to provide it yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
The innovation in his code is to determine start automatically. That's inferring a zero value. –  Ned Batchelder Jun 12 '12 at 19:06
    
We are using the type of the value, and it does produce zero value, even maybe we do not set our integers to zero by counter = int(), for example. –  Tony Veijalainen Jun 12 '12 at 19:11
    
Maybe it is not possible in 100 % case but fits better for me than allways defaulting to 0. And it would encourage to implement zero value for __add__ implementing classes properly. If you implement own class with proper zero value, you can supply the zero value every time to sum or define needless help function and not use builtin method, which feels strange regardless the small amount of code needed. And it would be confusing if I defined sum to overwrite builtin, so of course I would need to use other name to keep my code readable. –  Tony Veijalainen Jun 12 '12 at 19:32

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