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I currently have four different java apps that runs by jars started by .bat-files placed in starup folder in Windows XP Embedded start menu. I also start up Firefox. Now either Firefox or one of the Java apps just shuts down. Guessing I run out of memory (Win XP Embedded with 512 MB RAM).

The four Java apps are,

  • HMI backend (Built with Spark "micro" Framework)
  • A logger app that logs data from a PLC into a H2 database. This by using Timer/Timertask
  • The h2 database server
  • A scheduler to perform periodic jobs. This by using Quartz.

So, each of these Java apps are started in their own JVM (as far as I know). The first question is: Can I lower the memory usage of these four apps by running them in one JVM instead of four. If so, is it threads I should use to start up each of these apps?

Other than that, what's the first basic thing I should be doing to lower the memory footprint being quite new to "real" Java programming as I am. H2 connection pool, reuse objects and what else? Jconsole and that Xmx stuff?

Propably naive but I really thought that hey, GC will take care of "everything" for me. Guess not? =)

Edit: The HMI backend uses Jetty web server. Also, all code is either Open Source or built by me.

Edit 2: The Web Framework: http://www.sparkjava.com/. I'm serving static media through the framework and not through Jetty (jetty-webapp-7.3). This might be something to look at to improve memory usage? Other components for the HMI web app are freemarker template engine, gson, servlet-api-3, slf4j and log4j.

Perhaps trying to start the logger and scheduler in threads when starting the webapp could be possible. Then just have two JVMs running. One for webapp and one for the database server.

I'm using Java 7 and it's a 32 bit system. It will hopefully be for production use (or I'm in trouble).

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I have a feeling all jobs are tightly integrated so you should try to run them with one single main. This will reduce memory needs and cpu needs. –  tom Jun 12 '12 at 19:12
    
@tom -- I'm not familiar with some of the components mentioned, but it sounds to me as though they're essentially "black boxes" that can't be re-architectured willy-nilly? Or am I misunderstanding? –  Neil Coffey Jun 12 '12 at 19:35
    
Is this a virtual machine we're talking about ? Because 512 MB RAM these days seems from another world... –  Radu Murzea Jun 12 '12 at 19:36
    
@ Neil, the OP never stated he had no control of the application. If he/she cannot control the main of the applications you are absolutely correct! If so, the only thing I can think of is playing with Xmx and Xms. –  tom Jun 12 '12 at 19:40
    
I have full control of all applications. In the case of H2 and Quartz it's sort of wrappers around those libs. It's not a virtual machine we are talking about. It's actually a sort of PLC (from Beckhoff). Is 512 mb of RAM way to little ram for a few Java apps? –  daru Jun 12 '12 at 19:53
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2 Answers

Going from a set of separate processes to a single process isn't usually just a matter of "flipping a switch". They're fundamentally different architectures:

  • threads that belong to the same process share certain resources (memory space, file handles etc) which they can "see" among one another; they can communicate with one another and share data with one another in a very "lightweight" manner;
  • different processes are more "isolated" units to some extent: they can't just "peek" at each other's memory, file handles etc but rather must communicate with one another in "heavier" ways (e.g. via sockets or other facilities provided by the OS).

Now, how easily you could move from one model to the other and how much it would buy you really depends on what the particular components are doing and how they interact. I'm not familiar with some of the components you mention, but it sounds from your description as though you essentially have a pile of interconnected "black boxes" and you're not going to be able to do much re-architecturing.

So, I would suggest having a look at the documentation of the various components and seeing whether they allow you to specify the VM size (or "heap size") on startup, and then try and get the components down to the minimum they require. (Your logger process, presumably, doesn't need hundreds of megabytes...)

Windows in principle shouldn't "shut down a process because it runs out of memory". It might start chugging like hell if it needs to swap bits of your JVMs' heaps in and out of virtual memory[*]. But it shouldn't actually shut processes down. A given Java app, on the other hand, might decide to shut down (or shut down as default behaviour depending on its exception handling) if it gets an OutOfMemoryError while trying to allocate memory from its heap. What do the logs for the various components suggest has happened?

[*] Unlike native applications, Java applications don't cope well with virtual memory because to Java, its memory is a single "heap" which it effectively expects always to be paged in. You should avoid allocating a total heap size for your JVMs which is close to or greater than the amount of physical memory in the machine.

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I deliberately don't address aspects already covered by Neil Coffey's answer.

So, each of these Java apps are started in their own JVM (as far as I know). The first question is: Can I lower the memory usage of these four apps by running them in one JVM instead of four. If so, is it threads I should use to start up each of these apps?

No, or not easily (see Neil Coffey's answer).

But you could tweak the java memory settings for each of these .bat by passing command-line arguments to the java.exe program.

Considering you have a fairly constrained memory setting, and assuming you have at least Java SE 6 Update 10, I'd recommend you to try the G1 Garbage Collector, with which you can get decent performance for relatively low memory settings.

Maybe try to pass something like this, and adjust if needed:

-Xss64k -Xms128m -Xmx128m -XX:PermSize=64m -XX:MaxPermSize=64m -XX:+UnlockExperimentalVMOptions -XX:+UseG1GC -XX:+UseCompressedStrings -XX:+UseCompressedOops

Note that XX:+UseCompressedOops is only for x64 JVMs, and that it (as well as -XX:+UseCompressedStrings) may not work for you depending on your JVM version. Also, you don't say if it's for production or personal use. If for production use, I'd recommend you leave these 2 alone and just use the stuff up to -XX:+UseG1GC`.

The above is a variation of settings I use when I need to run multiple instances of Eclipse on a single machine, building rather larger projects with 2GB of RAM. Your environment is a bit more hardcore, unfortunately, but try with this one app at a time, and see how much you can squeeze and adapt.

If you can, do give us more info on what your processes are doing so we can try to assess how much memory they'd need. Possibly, you could reduce the stack size and heap size even more. The more we know, the less will tap in the dark when tweaking the settings.

Other than that, what's the first basic thing I should be doing to lower the memory footprint being quite new to "real" Java programming as I am. H2 connection pool, reuse objects and what else? Jconsole and that Xmx stuff?

H2 is already rather lightweight, sounds like good choice.

JConsole won't help you, but you may want to give a shot to JVisualVM, it can help profiling things a bit. Or aim for JProfiler if you can afford it. Otherwise Eclipse has a good memory analyzer.

Propably naive but I really thought that hey, GC will take care of "everything" for me. Guess not? =)

It's not magic, it just reclaims unused objects. If you have references to them, it can't know whether you might need them or not. So either make sure to not keep references alive (usually by keeping collections or inter-linked composite objects), or if you need long-lived ones maybe to look at Weak or Soft references (or at a cache implementation).

Edit: The HMI backend uses Jetty web server. Also, all code is either Open Source or built by me.

Give us more details, and we can dig further.


Another thing you could do is look at alternative JVMs. There are a few for embedded systems, which obviously have rather constrained environments.


Depending on the complexity of your scheduling jobs, you could roll out your own scheduler without needing to depend on Quartz. It's not particularly heavyweight, but if you need to squeeze every single MB, that would be the first element on your list that I'd attempt to get rid of.

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