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This might get a bit confusing and I'm not sure if it's possible, but I would appreciate any help. I have the following arrays (the items and number of lists might change, this is just an example):

var list_1 = ["A - 2" , "E - 5" , "C - 7"];
var list_2 = ["D - 2" , "A - 2" , "E - 3"];
var list_3 = ["C - 1" , "E - 8" , "A - 7"];

My expected output is:

var final = ["A - 2" , "C - 1" , "D - 2" , "E - 3"];

What I'm trying to do:

I'm trying to figure out how to go through each array item, see if the letter in the beginning of the item exists in the previous array and if the number in the item is lower than the previous item, replace it in the 'final' list.

Any ideas, or is this not possible?

jQuery is acceptable

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closed as too broad by David Wolever, AVD, Sompuperoo, Code Magician, Ed Bayiates Mar 10 at 1:08

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Why does "C - 1" come before "A - 2", even though "A - 2" comes first in the first array? –  Andrew Peacock Jun 12 '12 at 19:47
    
@AndrewPeacock - I think what he's saying is that the integer is sorted ASC first before the letter. –  Anthony Atkinson Jun 12 '12 at 19:48
    
Sorry, I'm not sure I see the problem. This is just a matter of writing a copule loops. Do you need help with the syntax for loops? Or… What? –  David Wolever Jun 12 '12 at 19:50
    
@AndrewPeacock, I've updated the question. –  stewart715 Jun 12 '12 at 19:51
    
@DavidWolever, yes, that's the issue I'm having. I'm not sure how to compare items to previous items when the order ore placement might be different. There will be no duplicate items, but how do I find the number value included in A when A in list_1 appears first and in list_2 appears second. Also, I'm not sure how to deal with strings with something like this. –  stewart715 Jun 12 '12 at 19:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var list_1 = ["A - 2" , "E - 5" , "C - 7"];
var list_2 = ["D - 2" , "A - 2" , "E - 3"];
var list_3 = ["C - 1" , "E - 8" , "A - 7"];

First, you merge the lists (third + second + first):

var list = list_3.concat(list_2).concat(list_1);

Create a map into which you're going to put the lowest number for each letter:

var final_map = {};

Loop through all items splitting each item to the letter (parts[0]) and the number (parts[1]).

You get the currently lowest number for the given letter. If there is no number or the new number is lower than the currently lowest one, you update the map.

list.forEach(function (item) {
  var parts = item.split(' - ');
  var current = final_map[parts[0]];

  if (!current || parts[1] < current) {
    final_map[parts[0]] = parts[1];
  }
});

Finally, you convert the map to an array.

var final = [];
Object.keys(final_map).sort().forEach(function (key) {
  final.push(key + ' - ' + final_map[key]);
});
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You have to go through the array manually:

var final = [];
$.each(list_1, function(i) { 
  // get each of your elements at index i. Ex list_1[i]
  // do the comparison, and push them to an final
  // possibly split the current element to match the letter and number
})
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Well, you've pretty much answered your question yourself. All you need now is to change human-readable algorithm to JavaScript. Iterate over lists with for up to .length elements, use String.substring or regexp to split data and save maximum found number in an object, where letter will be key and number - the value. Then just create final array from this object in yet another for loop and sort it, specifying custom function.

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I would just create a hash table that the key will be the integer while the value will just be a list of the letters. Than when it is time for you to print it you just go through the key + value as long as the value is not used before. You can also write your own sort function that really will look at the number first

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I would use a lookup to hold the current value and iterate through the arrays.

Rearranging your lists as such,

var lists = [["A - 2" , "E - 5" , "C - 7"], 
             ["D - 2" , "A - 2" , "E - 3"], 
             ["C - 1" , "E - 8" , "A - 7"]];

Using this,

var f = {}; 
for (var i = 0; i < lists.length; i++) { 
  for (var j = 0; j < lists[i].length; j++) { 
    var s = lists[i][j].split(' - '); 
    var ex = f[s[0]]; 
    if (!ex || ex > s[1]) 
      f[s[0]] = s[1];
  } 
}; 
var a = [];
for (var obj in f) {
  if (f.hasOwnProperty(obj)) { 
    a.push('' + obj + ' - ' + f[obj]);
  }
};

Gives

["A - 2", "E - 3", "C - 1", "D - 2"]
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!ex || (ex && ex > s[1]) is the same as !ex || ex > s[1] –  Jan Kuča Jun 12 '12 at 19:58
    
@JanKuča: right you are, I've corrected it. –  josh.trow Jun 12 '12 at 19:58

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