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I have a sed(1) script doing many step-by-step transformations (substitutions) of a given input stream that works well for the task itself. Now, what I need is to limit these operatations to/inside "/" quoted multiline string only. The input stream is simple text file containing multiline "/" quoted strings I need to perform my sequence of s/// commands on. I know it's quite hard to achieve that in sed(1) but I still hope anybody knows how to. Script I have so far (but works correctly on single line basis) follows.

The sed(1) "tricks" are at the beginning and at the end of the script, the rest is just sequence of s///s expressions and it is correct:

#! /bin/sed -f

# Convert /PinYin/ strings to /UTF-8 PinYin/ strings.
# Notice: /PinYin/ strings MUST NOT be multiline (to do).

/\/.*\// {

    s/\//\
/g

:a 
    h
    s/[^\n]*\n//
    s/\n.*//

    s/ang1/||aq||ng/g
    s/ang2/||aw||ng/g
    s/ang3/||ae||ng/g
    s/ang4/||ar||ng/g

    s/eng1/||eq||ng/g
    s/eng2/||ew||ng/g
    s/eng3/||ee||ng/g
    s/eng4/||er||ng/g

    s/ing1/||iq||ng/g
    s/ing2/||iw||ng/g
    s/ing3/||ie||ng/g
    s/ing4/||ir||ng/g

    s/ong1/||oq||ng/g
    s/ong2/||ow||ng/g
    s/ong3/||oe||ng/g
    s/ong4/||or||ng/g

    s/an1/||aq||n/g
    s/an2/||aw||n/g
    s/an3/||ae||n/g
    s/an4/||ar||n/g

    s/en1/||eq||n/g
    s/en2/||ew||n/g
    s/en3/||ee||n/g
    s/en4/||er||n/g

    s/in1/||iq||n/g
    s/in2/||iw||n/g
    s/in3/||ie||n/g
    s/in4/||ir||n/g

    s/un1/||uq||n/g
    s/un2/||uw||n/g
    s/un3/||ue||n/g
    s/un4/||ur||n/g

    s/ao1/||aq||o/g
    s/ao2/||aw||o/g
    s/ao3/||ae||o/g
    s/ao4/||ar||o/g

    s/ou1/||oq||u/g
    s/ou2/||ow||u/g
    s/ou3/||oe||u/g
    s/ou4/||or||u/g

    s/ai1/||aq||i/g
    s/ai2/||aw||i/g
    s/ai3/||ae||i/g
    s/ai4/||ar||i/g

    s/ei1/||eq||i/g
    s/ei2/||ew||i/g
    s/ei3/||ee||i/g
    s/ei4/||er||i/g

    s/a1/||aq||/g
    s/a2/||aw||/g
    s/a3/||ae||/g
    s/a4/||ar||/g

    s/a1/||aq||/g
    s/a2/||aw||/g
    s/a3/||ae||/g
    s/a4/||ar||/g

    s/er2/||ew||r/g
    s/er3/||ee||r/g
    s/er4/||er||r/g

    s/lyue/l||u:||e/g
    s/nyue/n||u:||e/g

    s/e1/||eq||/g
    s/e2/||ew||/g
    s/e3/||ee||/g
    s/e4/||er||/g

    s/o1/||oq||/g
    s/o2/||ow||/g
    s/o3/||oe||/g
    s/o4/||or||/g

    s/i1/||iq||/g
    s/i2/||iw||/g
    s/i3/||ie||/g
    s/i4/||ir||/g

    s/nyu3/n||u:e||/g

    s/lyu/l||u:||/g

    s/u:1/||u:q||/g
    s/u:2/||u:w||/g
    s/u:3/||u:e||/g
    s/u:4/||u:r||/g
    s/u:0/||u:s||/g

    s/u1/||uq||/g
    s/u2/||uw||/g
    s/u3/||ue||/g
    s/u4/||ur||/g

    s/||aq||/ā/g
    s/||aw||/á/g
    s/||ae||/ǎ/g
    s/||ar||/à/g

    s/||eq||/ē/g
    s/||ew||/é/g
    s/||ee||/ě/g
    s/||er||/è/g

    s/||iq||/ī/g
    s/||iw||/í/g
    s/||ie||/ǐ/g
    s/||ir||/ì/g

    s/||oq||/ō/g
    s/||ow||/ó/g
    s/||oe||/ǒ/g
    s/||or||/ò/g

    s/||uq||/ū/g
    s/||uw||/ú/g
    s/||ue||/ǔ/g
    s/||ur||/ù/g

    s/||u:q||/ǖ/g
    s/||u:w||/ǘ/g
    s/||u:e||/ǚ/g
    s/||u:r||/ǜ/g
    s/||u:s||/ü/g

    G
    s/\([^\n]*\)\n\([^\n]*\)\n[^\n]*\n/\2\/\1\//
    /\n/ b a
}

Sample input:

Some text containing for instance Chinese greeting /ni3
hao3/ and perhaps some other Chinese sentence, say /ni2
kan4, .../

Expected output:

Some text containing for instance Chinese greeting /nǐ
hǎo/ and perhaps some other Chinese sentence, say /ní
kàn, .../

My knowledge of sed(1) is not as powerful to solve this problem on my own. Therefor I ask you for helping me with it. Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Please improve your question by posting some properly formatted code you've applied to the problem. In addition, please post relavant error messages verbatim, and take the time to share the steps you've taken so far to research or resolve things on your own. –  CodeGnome Jun 12 '12 at 20:13
2  
AND please add sample input, and possibly required output. Good luck. –  shellter Jun 12 '12 at 20:24
    
I hope the question is fixed now. –  mjf Jun 12 '12 at 20:52

2 Answers 2

From what I understand in your question, you need to specify the address range for the sed commands:

sed '/\//,/\// {command1; command2; ...}'

However, this will in turn break when the /../ pattern is not multi-line. That means that you'll need to make all of them multi-line. To make sure there's only one / per line do:

sed 's_/_\n/_g' | sed {main sed command}

This also gives one the idea that you could treat multi-line quotes as one-line if you joined all lines to one in the first place:

cat myfile | tr '\n' ' ' | sed {your current commands}

P.S. Also I'd like to note that your "trick" in the beginning is a little flawed:

 /\/.*\//

This is greedy, so it won't process multiple patterns on the same line correctly. For this reason the second approach probably won't work as it is.

Edit: okay, this turned out more complex than I thought (or I'm too tired to see an easier way).

To get the lines back together you need to split them in a "unique" way, so that later you can tell which of the newlines were introduced by your script. I suggest doing it like this

sed 's_/_\n/\n_g'

so that each / gets its own line. If you see a line that consists of the only / character, you know you should stick it to the previous one and the next one. So first you do the above sed command on the file, then do the substitutions with the address range as /\//,/\//, and finally you need to put the lines back together. This can be done with

sed ':a $!{N;ba};s/\n\/\n/\//g'

so I suggest you finally pipe to this. I wouldn't be happy about having to use this myself, but you can always hide it inside a shell function or something like that.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello. There are some problems with your solution. For instance, I would need one more extra sed(1) command to join the broken lines back to the original form (user won't like to obtain broken paragraphs). And I also hoped there will be no need to pipe several scripts together to achieve that. But the main idea (breaking the lines) seems correct to me. Now the question is how to integrate this idea around the substitutions in one script (may be tricky). –  mjf Jun 12 '12 at 22:11
    
@mjf do you need the output to be exactly like the input (in terms of linebreaks) or just look decent? –  Lev Levitsky Jun 12 '12 at 22:58
    
Yes. To be exactly the same in terms of linebreaks. In other words, I need to perform the transformations inside every of the "/" quoted string as it is, including the linebreaks. –  mjf Jun 12 '12 at 23:01
    
@mjf see the updated answer. –  Lev Levitsky Jun 13 '12 at 0:08
    
Well, the joining sed expression suggested fails in certain circumstances. For instance, try to run it separately and enter just /\nfoo\n/\n^D in it. It fails because it expects extra line on input, I guess... –  mjf Jun 13 '12 at 6:17
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally it was quite easy to achieve with only a small improvement to the original sed(1) code. Perhaps it could be done somehow better but while having conversion code working in "line scope" I managed to let it be (with minor improvements that are not important to the essence of this question) and rather read whole file in the pattern space, replace newlines with \001 (^A) characters, let the original code do it's work and in the end replace the ^A characters back to newlines. Here it is:

#! /bin/sed -f

#  pinyin2utf8.sed -- Convert US-ASCII Pinyin to UTF-8
#  Copyright (C) 2012 Matous J. Fialka, <http://mjf.cz/>
#  Released under the terms of The MIT License
#
#  DESCRIPTION
#   Script converts all occurences of US-ASCII encoded Pinyin text
#   enclosed by the solidus characters pairs to UTF-8 encoded text.
#
#  USAGE
#   pinyin2utf8.sed filename [ > filename.out ]
#
#  WARNINGS
#   Script contains the ^A control character, usually displayed as
#   mentioned in most text editors, that can be usually reproduced
#   by pressing ^V ^A key sequence. The ^A control characters thus
#   MUST NOT occure in the input stream.  To find the sequences in
#   the script lookup the y/// command in the code, please.
#
#   In the US-ASCII encoded Pinyin to UTF-8 Pinyin conversion code
#   special delimiting sequences of left and right parentheses are
#   used and those two delimiting sequences of left or righ parens
#   SHOULD NOT be used in the input stream.

: 0

$! {
    N
    b 0
}

# HERE BE DRAGONS

y/\n/^A/

y/\//\
/

: a

h

s/[^\n]*\n//
s/\n.*//

# CONVERSION CODE BEGINNING

s/ang1/(((aq)))ng/g
s/ang2/(((aw)))ng/g
s/ang3/(((ae)))ng/g
s/ang4/(((ar)))ng/g
s/eng1/(((eq)))ng/g
s/eng2/(((ew)))ng/g
s/eng3/(((ee)))ng/g
s/eng4/(((er)))ng/g
s/ing1/(((iq)))ng/g
s/ing2/(((iw)))ng/g
s/ing3/(((ie)))ng/g
s/ing4/(((ir)))ng/g
s/ong1/(((oq)))ng/g
s/ong2/(((ow)))ng/g
s/ong3/(((oe)))ng/g
s/ong4/(((or)))ng/g

s/an1/(((aq)))n/g
s/an2/(((aw)))n/g
s/an3/(((ae)))n/g
s/an4/(((ar)))n/g
s/en1/(((eq)))n/g
s/en2/(((ew)))n/g
s/en3/(((ee)))n/g
s/en4/(((er)))n/g
s/in1/(((iq)))n/g
s/in2/(((iw)))n/g
s/in3/(((ie)))n/g
s/in4/(((ir)))n/g
s/un1/(((uq)))n/g
s/un2/(((uw)))n/g
s/un3/(((ue)))n/g
s/un4/(((ur)))n/g
s/ao1/(((aq)))o/g
s/ao2/(((aw)))o/g
s/ao3/(((ae)))o/g
s/ao4/(((ar)))o/g
s/ou1/(((oq)))u/g
s/ou2/(((ow)))u/g
s/ou3/(((oe)))u/g
s/ou4/(((or)))u/g
s/ai1/(((aq)))i/g
s/ai2/(((aw)))i/g
s/ai3/(((ae)))i/g
s/ai4/(((ar)))i/g
s/ei1/(((eq)))i/g
s/ei2/(((ew)))i/g
s/ei3/(((ee)))i/g
s/ei4/(((er)))i/g

s/a1/(((aq)))/g
s/a2/(((aw)))/g
s/a3/(((ae)))/g
s/a4/(((ar)))/g
s/a1/(((aq)))/g
s/a2/(((aw)))/g
s/a3/(((ae)))/g
s/a4/(((ar)))/g

s/er2/(((ew)))r/g
s/er3/(((ee)))r/g
s/er4/(((er)))r/g

s/lyue/l(((u:)))e/g
s/nyue/n(((u:)))e/g

s/e1/(((eq)))/g
s/e2/(((ew)))/g
s/e3/(((ee)))/g
s/e4/(((er)))/g
s/o1/(((oq)))/g
s/o2/(((ow)))/g
s/o3/(((oe)))/g
s/o4/(((or)))/g
s/i1/(((iq)))/g
s/i2/(((iw)))/g
s/i3/(((ie)))/g
s/i4/(((ir)))/g

s/nyu3/n(((u:e)))/g

s/lyu/l(((u:)))/g

s/u:1/(((u:q)))/g
s/u:2/(((u:w)))/g
s/u:3/(((u:e)))/g
s/u:4/(((u:r)))/g
s/u:0/(((u:s)))/g

s/u1/(((uq)))/g
s/u2/(((uw)))/g
s/u3/(((ue)))/g
s/u4/(((ur)))/g

s/(((aq)))/ā/g
s/(((aw)))/á/g
s/(((ae)))/ǎ/g
s/(((ar)))/à/g
s/(((eq)))/ē/g
s/(((ew)))/é/g
s/(((ee)))/ě/g
s/(((er)))/è/g
s/(((iq)))/ī/g
s/(((iw)))/í/g
s/(((ie)))/ǐ/g
s/(((ir)))/ì/g
s/(((oq)))/ō/g
s/(((ow)))/ó/g
s/(((oe)))/ǒ/g
s/(((or)))/ò/g
s/(((uq)))/ū/g
s/(((uw)))/ú/g
s/(((ue)))/ǔ/g
s/(((ur)))/ù/g

s/(((u:q)))/ǖ/g
s/(((u:w)))/ǘ/g
s/(((u:e)))/ǚ/g
s/(((u:r)))/ǜ/g
s/(((u:s)))/ü/g

# CONVERSION CODE END

G

s/\([^\n]*\)\n\([^\n]*\)\n[^\n]*\n/\2\/\1\//

/\n/ b a

# HERE BE DRAGONS

y/^A/\
/

Sample input text:

$ cat test.in
ni3 hao3
/ni3 hao3/
ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/
/ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/
/ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/
/ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3
/ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3 /ni3 hao3/

ni3 hao3 /ni3
hao3/ ni3 hao3

/ni3 hao3
ni3
hao3
ni3 hao3/ ni3 hao3

Sample run:

$ pinyin2utf8.sed test.in
ni3 hao3
/nǐ hǎo/
ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/
/nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/
/nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/
/nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3
ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3
/nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3 /nǐ hǎo/

ni3 hao3 /nǐ
hǎo/ ni3 hao3

/nǐ hǎo
nǐ
hǎo
nǐ hǎo/ ni3 hao3

It seems to work just fine (at least to suite my needs) and thus I consider this issue to be closed. Many thanks belongs to all people involved, especially Mr. Lev Levitsky!

P.S.: I also placed the code here (GitHub) where you can track some possible future changes.

P.S. 2: The ^A characters were lost while saving this answer. Now they are replaced with their ASCII representation here. You have to replace them to their binary representation (in vi(1) press ^V ^A in insert mode) or use the GitHub version instead.

P.S. 3: I still feel the ^A "hack" as quite ugly. In case anybody knows to avoid it in this case while still having the middle conversion code as simple as it is now, please share your ideas.

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