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Here is the first table 'tbl1':

+---------+---------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type                | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+---------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| val     | varchar(45)         | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                |
| id      | bigint(20) unsigned | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
+---------+---------------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

With its indexes:

+-------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| Table | Non_unique | Key_name | Seq_in_index | Column_name | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment |
+-------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| tbl1  |          0 | PRIMARY  |            1 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| tbl1  |          1 | val      |            1 | val         | A         |     2147085 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl1  |          1 | id_val   |            1 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| tbl1  |          1 | id_val   |            2 | val         | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl1  |          1 | val_id   |            1 | val         | A         |     2147085 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl1  |          1 | val_id   |            2 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
+-------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+

(The reason for some extra indexing is this: http://bit.ly/KWx1Xz.)

The second table is just about the same. Here are its index cardinalities though:

+--------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| Table  | Non_unique | Key_name | Seq_in_index | Column_name | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment |
+--------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| tbl2   |          0 | PRIMARY  |            1 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| tbl2   |          1 | val      |            1 | val         | A         |      881336 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl2   |          1 | id_val   |            1 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| tbl2   |          1 | id_val   |            2 | val         | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl2   |          1 | val_id   |            1 | val         | A         |      881336 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
| tbl2   |          1 | val_id   |            2 | id          | A         |   201826018 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
+--------+------------+----------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+

The task is to inner-join them on the val column and get the id's list (and to do it in 1 second).

Here is the 'join' approach:

SELECT tbl1.id FROM tbl1 JOIN tbl2 ON tbl1.val = 'iii' AND tbl2.val = 'iii' AND tbl1.id = tbl2.id;

Result: 10831 rows in set (55.15 sec)

Query explain:

+----+-------------+--------+--------+----------------------------------+---------+---------+---------------------------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table  | type   | possible_keys                    | key     | key_len | ref                       | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+--------+--------+----------------------------------+---------+---------+---------------------------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | tbl1   | ref    | PRIMARY,val,id_val,val_id        | val_id  | 138     | const                     | 5160 | Using where; Using index |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | tbl2   | eq_ref | PRIMARY,val,id_val,val_id        | PRIMARY | 8       | search_test.tbl1.id       | 1    | Using where              |
+----+-------------+--------+--------+----------------------------------+---------+---------+---------------------------+------+--------------------------+

And here is the 'in' approach:

SELECT id FROM tbl1 WHERE val = 'iii' and id IN (SELECT id FROM tbl2 WHERE val = 'iii');

Result: 10831 rows in set (1 min 10.15 sec)

Explain:

+----+--------------------+--------+-----------------+---------------------------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type        | table  | type            | possible_keys                   | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                    |
+----+--------------------+--------+-----------------+---------------------------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY            | tbl1   | ref             | val,val_id                      | val_id  | 138     | const | 8553 | Using where; Using index |
|  2 | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | tbl2   | unique_subquery | PRIMARY,val,id_val,val_id       | PRIMARY | 8       | func  |    1 | Using where              |
+----+--------------------+--------+-----------------+---------------------------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+

So, here is the question: how to tweak this query to let MySQL accomplish it in a second?

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what a piece of artwork! –  Har Jun 12 '12 at 20:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK I have tested this on 30,000+ records per table and it runs pretty darn quick.

As it currently stands you're performing a join on two massive tables presently but if you scan for matches on 'val' on each table first that will reduce the size of your join sets substantially.

I originally posted this answer as a set of subqueries but I didn't realize that MySQL is painfully slow at nested subqueries since it executes from the outside in. However if you define the subqueries as views it runs them from the inside out.

So, first create the views.

CREATE VIEW tbl1_iii AS (
SELECT * FROM tbl1 WHERE val='iii'
);
CREATE VIEW tbl2_iii AS (
SELECT * FROM tbl2 WHERE val='iii'
);

Then run the query.

SELECT tbl1_iii.id from tbl1_iii,tbl2_iii
WHERE tbl1_iii.id = tbl2_iii.id;

Lightning.

share|improve this answer
    
Nested queries is probably a bad way to go on this. –  Steve Robbins Jun 13 '12 at 0:35
    
Oh because it's MySQL? –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 5:02
    
Hmm. I was reading about this just now and it seems like there are two ways to force MySQL to execute the inner query first: 1. store the subqueries as views or 2. give the entire subquery an alias (using AS) –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 5:12
    
Only one way to find out. Test it. –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 5:14
    
Just tested it, and edited my answer. Thanks @stevether –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 5:54
SELECT tbl1.id FROM tbl1 JOIN tbl2 ON tbl1.id = tbl2.id and tbl1.val = tbl2.val
where tbl1.val = 'iii';
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, will test it very soon! But could you explain what difference does it make from my join? –  ishalyminov Jun 12 '12 at 21:13
    
This is good but mine is faster :) –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 17:12
    
shl, you were wasting time comparing to 'iii' twice which means you were scanning the table over and over. (find a row in tbl1 and tbl2 where tbl1.id = tbl2.id, now check if tbl1.val='iii', now check if tbl2.val = 'iii'). Srini's solution works (and mine works) because MySQL processes joins from outside in. So first it will find all the matches of 'iii' on tbl1, (which drastically reduces the number of records to sort through) and then compares PKs and looks for a match on 'val'. I.e. a table scan on tbl1, a scan on tbl1 (reduced once) & tbl2 to match ids and vals, i.e. 3 scans total. –  matchdav Jun 13 '12 at 17:24

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