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I'm creating a chunked QuadTree terrain and I'm trying to ensure that there is never more than one level of detail difference between two nodes. My current code for the constructor is this:

QuadNode::QuadNode(Rect area, QuadNode * p, QuadRoot * r)
{
    Root = r;

    Parent = p;
    Level = p->Level + 1;

    InitializeGeometry(area);

    for(int iii = 0; iii < 4; iii++)
            Children[iii] = 0;

    for(int iii = 0; iii < 4; iii++)
    {
            if(QuadrantNeedsChild(iii))
                    Children[iii] = new QuadNode(GetRect(iii), this, Root);
    }
}

And that works fine. But in order to force no more than one level of difference between two neighbour nodes I'm trying to add this to the end of the constructor:

QuadNode * neighbour;

for(int direction = 0; direction < 4; direction++)
{
    neighbour = FindNeighbour(direction);
    if(neighbour)
    {
        while(Level - neighbour->Level > 1)
        {
            neighbour->Subdivide();
            neighbour = FindNeighbour(direction);
                    //neighbour should now be a child of the previous neighbour
        }
    }
}

But that stack overflows. One reason I think is that the assignment portion of the Children[iii] = new QuadNode(GetRect(iii), this, Root); statement never executes and FindNeighbour() requires the children be set to find the proper neighbour. But I don't think that's the only problem as the code never actually reaches the second neighbour = FindNeighbour(direction); line and I have no idea what's causing that.

If I run that second code snippet in a new function after the base creation of the tree it more-or-less works but then it requires multiple passes to ensure newly created nodes don't themselves create a level difference > 1. So I'd much rather have this code in the constructor if at all possible. Can anyone think of a way of achieving this?

A few notes on the class in case it helps QuadrantNeedsChild(int quadrant) ensures the level never exceeds 8 so I know I'm not just going too deep. Subdivide() simply runs Children[iii] = new QuadNode(GetRect(iii), this, Root); on all the quadrants. FindNeighbour(int direction) can return the parent or an ancestor. For example if D is looking for the north neighbour it will get its grandparent(the entire diagram) if B was never subdivided in the following:

 - - - - - -
|     |     |
|  A  |  B  |
|     |     |
|- - - - - -|
|     | D|  |
|  C  |-----|
|     |  |  |
 - - - - - -

The subdivide function just subdivides a given quadrant or all quadrants if supplied with an out of range quadrant.

void QuadNode::Subdivide(int quadrant)
{
    if(quadrant > -1 && quadrant < 4)
    {
        if(!Children[quadrant])
            Children[quadrant] = new QuadNode(GetRect(quadrant), this, Root);
    }
    else
        for(int iii = 0; iii < 4; iii++)
            if(Children[iii] == 0)
                Children[iii] = new QuadNode(GetRect(iii), this, Root);
}
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I have to add the mandatory stackoverflow tag here. –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 12 '12 at 21:36
    
Side note: variable names in c++ by most conventions start with lowercase letters, while class names start with uppercase. –  tmpearce Jun 13 '12 at 2:29
    
Please post a complete, compileable example. –  Kuba Ober Jun 13 '12 at 3:54
    
Why is the north neighbour of 'D' the whole diagram, and not 'B'? What is the south neighbour of 'B'? –  Rook Jun 13 '12 at 7:31
    
B has no neighbours as it hasn't been subdivided. Until a quadrant is subdivided it isn't a node. –  Spectralist Jun 13 '12 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

When the first child of a node is constructed, does it find it's own parent as a neighbor, since that parent has no children yet (the first one is just about to be created)?

That would cause the node to cal Subdivide() on its own parent, which would construct a new child which again would call Subdivide(),...

And even without this, constructing the first node on a new level will Subdivide() all it's neighbors which in turn will subdivide all neighbors of those neighbors, recursively. Is this how it's supposed to work? For the deepest level this will cause something like 48 levels of recursion.

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