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Given the variables:

my $var1 = "fish";
my $var2 = "ocean";

My input strings can be either fishin_ocean or fishout_ocean.

How do I write a Perl regex to match both the input strings, where parts of the regex are in $var1 and $var2? This one (where the string is in $var3) doesn't return either of the above strings:

  $var3 =~ /$var1.+?$var2/;

Edit from OP's answer:

I think it is the special square braket at the end that is causing the problem

    my $a = "slash_wideiscan"; my $b = "_mnn3h_reg[0]";
    my @array1 = qw (slash_wideiscanps_mnn3h_reg[0] 
                     slash_wideiscanptlr_mnn3h_reg[0] 
                     slash_wideiscanps_mnn0h_reg);
    for my $element (@array1) {
        if ($element =~ /($a.+?$b)/) {
            print "YES : $element\n";
        } else {
            print "NO : $element\n";
        }
    }

Answer that came back was

    NO : slash_wideiscanps_mnn3h_reg[0]
    NO : slash_wideiscanptlr_mnn3h_reg[0]
    NO : slash_wideiscanps_mnn0h_reg

I actually want

    YES : slash_wideiscanps_mnn3h_reg[0]
    YES : slash_wideiscanptlr_mnn3h_reg[0]
    NO : slash_wideiscanps_mnn0h_reg
share|improve this question
    
What exactly are you trying to achieve? The matching operator does not return a string in scalar context. –  choroba Jun 13 '12 at 0:50
    
Welcome to StackOverflow. Please note that we value clear questions. Please see the FAQ. I've edited the question for you, but I may have misinterpreted what you are after. If so, you should re-edit the question so it reflects what you are really asking. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 13 '12 at 0:55
    
You should use proper names for your variables. It will make your life easier. –  TLP Jun 13 '12 at 0:59

4 Answers 4

This should work:

/fish(in|out)_ocean/
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately there can be a ton of stuff after fish not just "in" or "out".that's why I was trying out a wildcard character –  cosmo kramer Jun 13 '12 at 5:25
    
I was thrown off by, "My input strings can be either fishin_ocean or fishout_ocean." –  gpojd Jun 13 '12 at 11:01

Not quite clear what you are looking for, but here is your regex in action:

my $fish  = "fish";
my $ocean = "ocean";

for my $word ("fishin_ocean", "fishout_ocean") {
    if ($word =~ /($fish.+?$ocean)/) {  # parens capture to $1
         print "Word $word matches\n";
         print "The matching part is: $1\n";  # $1 contains the captured text
    }
}

More info in perldoc perlretut and perldoc perlre

share|improve this answer

You regex is fine. The problem is that you are thinking the regex returns the matched string, but in reality, it only returns true or false (if it matches or does not match).

If you want to capture a match, use parentheses around the part you want to capture. Captures are stored in order in $1, $2, $3, etc...

my ($var1, $var2, $var3) = ("fish", "ocean", "fishin_ocean")

$var3 =~ /($var1)(.+?$var2)/;    # only returns true or false
print $1;                        # prints fish
print $2;                        # prints in_ocean
share|improve this answer

According to your answer (that must be an update to your question), escape each part of your regex with \Q\E like the following:

my $a = "slash_wideiscan"; 
my $b = "_mnn3h_reg[0]";
my @array1 = qw (slash_wideiscanps_mnn3h_reg[0] 
                 slash_wideiscanptlr_mnn3h_reg[0] 
                 slash_wideiscanps_mnn0h_reg);
for my $element (@array1) {
    if ($element =~ /(\Q$a\E.+?\Q$b\E)/) {
               here___^   ^    ^   ^
        print "YES : $element\n";
    } else {
        print "NO : $element\n";
    }
}

output:

YES : slash_wideiscanps_mnn3h_reg[0]
YES : slash_wideiscanptlr_mnn3h_reg[0]
NO : slash_wideiscanps_mnn0h_reg
share|improve this answer

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