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Lets say I have a string

s="""

print 'hi'
    print 'hi'
print 3333/0
"""

Is there a module or way that can help me check the syntax of this string?

I would like the output to be like:

Line 2, indentation Line 3, Division by Zero

I have heard of pyFlakes, pyChecker and pyLint but those check a file, not a string.

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you can use compile –  JBernardo Jun 13 '12 at 1:02
    
use triple quotes """ """ if you want the string to span over multiple lines. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 13 '12 at 1:06
    
The answer below looks fine. For future reference, an api that takes a file will also work with a 'file-like object', see the StringIO module which can be used to make a string that can be read as if it were a file. –  jmnben Jun 13 '12 at 1:12

2 Answers 2

The compile() function will tell you about compile-time errors:

try:
    compile(s, "bogusfile.py", "exec")
except Exception as e:
    print "Problem: %s" % e

Keep in mind though: one error will prevent the others from being reported, and some of your errors (ZeroDivision) are a run-time error, not something the compiler detects.

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Hmm, yeah, but I was hoping to stay away from file IO –  user1357159 Jun 13 '12 at 1:06
    
There's no file I/O here... "bogusfile.py" is just a name for the compiler to use as the file name. Perhaps you could tell us more about the whole problem you're trying to solve? –  Ned Batchelder Jun 13 '12 at 1:08
    
Hmm, I was hoping that it could give me errors including Division by Zero, maybe using execfile but using a string (if possible) and changing the namespace would work? I dont know, also I was hoping that it would display all the errors –  user1357159 Jun 13 '12 at 1:17
    
"division by zero" cannot be caught until an attempt is made to run the code. That's just how Python works. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 13 '12 at 2:51
s="""

print 'hi'
    print 'hi'
print 3333/0
"""
eval(s)

output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "prog.py", line 7, in <module>
    eval(s)
  File "<string>", line 3
    print 'hi'
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
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