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I currently have a Data Access Layer that is also exposing some API using a web service.

API Call

[WebMethod]
public List<GlobalStat> GetStats()
{
    List<GlobalStat> Stats = new List<GlobalStat>();

    string sql = @"
       A huge multi-line SQL query
    ";

    try
    {
        string ConString = Constants.connString;
        con = new SqlConnection(ConString);

        cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, con);
        con.Open();
        dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

        while (dr.Read())
        {
            GlobalStat stat = new GlobalStat();
            stat.Key = dr[0].ToString();
            stat.Value = int.Parse(dr[1].ToString());

            Stats.Add(stat);
        }

    }
    catch (Exception x)
    {

        Response.Write(x);
    }

    return Stats;
}

I am a bit worried about the how the SQL is written.

There are so many things hard-coded into this: Database name, Table names etc.

To solve this problem, do I just create a separate global file with all SQL commands at one place or is there a better paradigm? I am not creating the SQL tables inside the application but these tables reside on a different pre-built database.

How should I structure an application that uses inline SQL to generate data from a database?

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closed as not constructive by George Stocker, Kirk Woll, Aaron Bertrand, ypercube, Graviton Jun 13 '12 at 7:07

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Any reason why you need you want to use parameratized queries? There are many mature ORM's (Nhibernate, Entity Framework) that you can reliably call upon. –  Jesse Jun 13 '12 at 2:22
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You bring up several issues, and the code you are showing us brings up some more. Things you may want to think about:

  • Try to keep the database centric activities constrained into their own classes. No one else needs to know about how to return a list of rows for the GlobalStats object other than the actual class that handles pulling that data out of the database and making it into an actual object for you. No one. If anyone else does know, then your class is not using information hiding (which since we're in an object oriented language, you should be).

  • If the object implements IDisposable, then you should be wrapping it with a try {} finally {} block, or even better, wrap it with a using statement (see my second example below).

  • Your connection string should only be accessible to the classes that actually need it (part of separating your concerns). Perhaps having a base DataAccess class that has that information?

    public abstract class DataAccess 
    {
        protected const string ConnectionString = "YourConnectionStringHere";
    }
    

Then your repositories can inherit from this class, and you don't have a global static constant that causes your code to be unnecessarily coupled.

Here's how I'd write what you're writing (be careful, this code isn't really meant to be used, it's for illustrative purposes only):

[WebMethod]
public List<GlobalStat> GetStats()
{
    GlobalStatsRepository repository = new GlobalStatsRepository();
    List<GlobalStat> stats = repository.GetStats();
    return stats;
}

DataAccessLayer

public class GlobalStatsRepository
{
    public List<GlobalStat> GetStats()
    {

         string sql = @"SELECT * from GlobalStats"; //no, not a good practice

        var stats = new List<GlobalStat>();

        try
        {
            string ConString = Constants.connString;
            conn = new SqlConnection(ConString);

            cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, conn);
            conn.Open();
            dr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

            while (dr.Read())
            {
                GlobalStat stat = new GlobalStat();
                stat.Key = dr[0].ToString();
                stat.Value = int.Parse(dr[1].ToString());

                stats.Add(stat);
            }

        }
        catch (SQLDataReaderException ex)
        {
            logger.Log(ex);
            throw;
        }
    return stats;
    }
}

Example of Parameritized Query

public List<GlobalStat> GetStatsById(int id)
{
    var stats = new List<GlobalStat>();

    string sql = @"SELECT * from GlobalStats WHERE Id = @Id";
    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(ConString))
    {
         conn.Open();
         using (SQLCommand command = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
         {         
             command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("Id", id));
             SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
             while (reader.Read())
             {
                  GlobalStat stat = new GlobalStat();
                  stat.Key = dr[0].ToString();
                  stat.Value = int.Parse(dr[1].ToString());

                  stats.Add(stat);
             }
         }
     }
     return stats;
}
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The proper way, IMHO, is to call stored procedures. In your C# code you just reference a stored procedure and pass properly typed parameters. Ad hoc SQL built up in your C# code opens the door up for many things - not the least of which are SQL injection and inefficient use of plan cache. Plus it makes it very difficult for you to refactor your queries without recompiling and redeploying the application. That will be necessary for some changes (e.g. when the interface to a stored procedure changes), but shouldn't be necessary for many other typical query changes.

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So I am assuming that these stored procedures would then be first stored on the SQL Server and then just "used" within the application? Lastly, is it a good practice to check and create these stored procedures from within our application or should this be done in a separate step? –  Legend Jun 13 '12 at 1:15
1  
This is obviously just opinion, but eeew stored procs. I much prefer my queries in my code, where they're under source control and easier to see and tweak. –  josh3736 Jun 13 '12 at 1:17
1  
@josh3736 "eeew" doesn't sound like a very constructive argument. And since when are you unable to save your stored procedures in source control? –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 13 '12 at 1:18
1  
Not at all -- I was just hoping I could be lazy and upvote the canonical answer. But without rigor, this answer doesn't qualify. –  Kirk Woll Jun 13 '12 at 1:21
1  
@AaronBertrand You do bring up a good point: If this post is eliciting opinions instead of answers, should it even be open? –  George Stocker Jun 13 '12 at 1:57
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Stored Procedures or LINQ to SQL are two popular database access paradigms within C#.

For more information regarding LINQ to SQL check out Using Linq to SQL on Scott Gu's Blog.

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