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I'm kind of new to mongodb and NoSQL data design in general.

I'm building a mongodb database that will have some denormalized data. For exemple, my "User" documents contains a reference (just the id) to zero or more "Article" documents and my Article documents contains references to zero or more users.

Since I'm using the repository pattern, no parts of my Data Access Layer knows about Articles AND Users. Where in my code should I check to make sure that all my documents are consistent with each others? Should I simply let the DAL's users code do the checks?

Would it be a good idea to have a Data Integrity Script run once in a while to check if everything is consistent?

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1 Answer 1

Here is Microsoft's write-up on the Repository Pattern. From that document:

Use a repository to separate the logic that retrieves the data and maps it to the entity model from the business logic that acts on the model.

You have a couple of questions:

Where in my code should I check to make sure that all my documents are consistent with each others?

Based on the statement above, I think it's clear that this logic belongs in the Repository. The relation between these objects only exists at the layer of "business logic", the database cannot enforce these types of rules.

Should I simply let the DAL's users code do the checks?

How could they? As the writer of the repository, you are the DAL user. For MongoDB, the DAL is basically the driver.

You could possibly write a wrapper around the driver that would wrap the multiple writes in some form of transactions. But you would have to write this, MongoDB has no notion of transactions.

Would it be a good idea to have a Data Integrity Script run once in a while to check if everything is consistent?

At the end of the day, whoever writes the repository is going to be responsible for the integrity of the data. Such a script might be useful, but it would definitely suck a lot of CPU cycles.

My suggestion for N:M mappings is to start building some basic blocks for handling the multiple writes that are required to keep these two in sync. One idea is to Queue the changes and let a background job make the updates. This way you don't have to worry about multiple writes and roll-backs causing bad data.

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