Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get all the text in a node for a following set and returning as one value (not multiple nodes).

<p>
   "I love eating out."
   <br>
   <br>
   "This is my favorite restaurant."
   <br>
   "I will definitely be back"
</p>

I am using '/p' and get all the results but it returns with line breaks. Also trying '/p/text()' results in getting each text between each tag as a separate returned value. The ideal return would be --

"I love eating out. This is my favorite restaurant. I will definitely be back"

I've tried searching other questions but couldn't find something as close. Please not that in the current environment I am restricted to only use an XPath Query and cannot parse after or setup any HTML pre-parsing. Specifically I'm using the importXML function inside of Google Docs.

share|improve this question
    
Just select the text of all descendants of p with /p//*/text(). Access the content of text node with textContent. You will still need to concatenate them together. –  nhahtdh Jun 13 '12 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use:

normalize-space(/)

When this XPath expression is evaluated, the string value of the document node (/) is first produced and this is provided as argument to the standard XPath function normalize-space().

By definition, normalize-space() returns its argument with the leading and trailing adjacent whitespace characters eliminated, and any interim such group of adjacent whitespace characters -- replaced by a single space character.

The evaluation of the above XPath expression results in:

"I love eating out." "This is my favorite restaurant." "I will definitely be back"

To eliminate the quotes, we additionally use the translate() function:

normalize-space(translate(/,'&quot;', ''))

The result of evaluating this expression is:

I love eating out. This is my favorite restaurant. I will definitely be back

Finally, to have this result wrapped in quotes itself, we use the concat() function:

concat('&quot;',
       normalize-space(translate(/,'&quot;', '')),
       '&quot;'
       )

The evaluation of this XPath expression produces exactly the wanted result:

"I love eating out. This is my favorite restaurant. I will definitely be back"

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:value-of select=
   "concat('&quot;',
           normalize-space(translate(/,'&quot;', '')),
           '&quot;'
           )"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document (corrected to be made well-formed):

<p>
       "I love eating out."
       <br />
       <br />
       "This is my favorite restaurant."
       <br />
       "I will definitely be back"
</p>

the XPath expression is evaluated and the result of this evaluation is copied to the output:

"I love eating out. This is my favorite restaurant. I will definitely be back"
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing response. This works well, but just wondering if normalize-space works when looking at multiple children... When I used normalize-space against similar datasets on a page, instead of returning multiple single values, it was only one single value returned for the whole page (even if there were multiple children with similar data I was trying to extract). My goal is to evaluate multiple similar areas on the page and return each one as a single value. –  Richard Ortega Jun 15 '12 at 2:13
    
@RichardOrtega: This isn't possible as a single XPath 1.0 expression (with XPath 2.0 it is possible to write a single expression to produce a sequence containing exactly the wanted strings). So, with XPath 1.0 you'll need to select the text nodes one by one and process each selected node in the programming language that is hosting XPath. If you are interested in an XSLT solution -- just ask a new question and let me know :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jun 15 '12 at 2:46
    
thank you so much, you've been a great help! Very informative, it was one of my first times using XPath. –  Richard Ortega Jun 16 '12 at 17:00
    
@RichardOrtega: You are welcome. I recommend using a tool for learning XPath that I wrote years ago: The XPath Visualizer -- available at: huttar.net/dimitre/XPV/TopXML-XPV.html . Many thousands of people have used the XPV to learn XPath the fun way. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jun 16 '12 at 17:08

If using Apps Script is an option, the Document service has a method to return all text in a document as a string:

https://developers.google.com/apps-script/class_document#getText

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.