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Is there any good or standard way of doing this?

Take the following example:

$values = array(
    'blue'
    , 'blue'    
    , 'blue'
    , 'blue'
    , 'green'
    , 'red'
    , 'yellow'
    , 'yellow'
     , 'purple'
    , 'purple'
    , 'purple'
);

I need it to be separated so no two identical values are touching (unless there is no possible solution -- in which case either generating an error, returning false or anything else is acceptable).

Here's the above array (done by hand) but how I am trying to change it:

$values = array(
    'blue'
    , 'purple'
    , 'green'
    , 'purple'
    , 'blue'
    , 'red'
    , 'blue'
    , 'yellow'
    , 'blue'
    , 'yellow'
    , 'purple'
)

The values won't necessarily be in order in the beginning -- that was just for simplicities sake.

Any ideas? Any code to get me started in the right direction?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This function should do the trick:

function uniq_sort($arr){
    if(!count($arr))
        return array();

    $counts = array_count_values($arr);
    arsort($counts);
    while(NULL !== ($key = key($counts)) && $counts[$key]){
        if(isset($prev) && $prev == $key){
            next($counts);
            $key = key($counts);
            if($key === NULL)
                return false;
        }
        $prev = $result[] = $key;

        $counts[$key]--;
        if(!$counts[$key])
            unset($counts[$key]);

        arsort($counts);
        reset($counts);
    }
    return $result;
}

Example usage:

$values = array('blue', 'blue', 'blue', 'blue', 'green', 'red', 'yellow', 'yellow', 'purple', 'purple', 'purple');
print_r(uniq_sort($values));

$values = array('a', 'b', 'b');
print_r(uniq_sort($values));

$values = array(1);
print_r(uniq_sort($values));

$values = array(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4);
print_r(uniq_sort($values));

$values = array(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3);
var_dump(uniq_sort($values));

And output:

Array
(
    [0] => blue
    [1] => purple
    [2] => blue
    [3] => yellow
    [4] => blue
    [5] => purple
    [6] => blue
    [7] => purple
    [8] => red
    [9] => yellow
    [10] => green
)
Array
(
    [0] => b
    [1] => a
    [2] => b
)
Array
(
    [0] => 1
)
Array
(
    [0] => 1
    [1] => 3
    [2] => 1
    [3] => 4
    [4] => 1
    [5] => 2
    [6] => 1
)
bool(false)
share|improve this answer
    
Love it, thanks! –  Kerry Jun 13 '12 at 4:00
1  
@Kerry No problem, and I take back what I said in my original revision about it being able to be optimized by removing the arsort from the loop. It turns out it's ridiculously hard to swap the position of two key/value pairs in a PHP array, and the solution would probably be slower than a call to arsort –  Paulpro Jun 13 '12 at 4:03
    
Great -- looks good to me, it's one of those functions that I had never thought needing before today –  Kerry Jun 13 '12 at 4:21
    
Nice. I feel that the method used(always choosing the highest frequency first) is guaranteed to find a solution, if a solution exists. –  goat Jun 13 '12 at 4:30
$values = array(
        'blue'
        , 'blue'    
        , 'blue'
        , 'blue'
        , 'green'
        , 'red'
        , 'yellow'
        , 'yellow'
        , 'purple'
        , 'purple'
        , 'purple'
    );
    $value_count = Array();
    foreach($values as $v){
        if(isset($value_count[$v])){
            $value_count[$v]++;
        }else{
            $value_count[$v] = 1;
        }
    }
    unset($v);
    //Now generate new array 
    $result = Array();//This line is technically not necessary 
    $done = false;
    while(!$done){
        $done = true;
        foreach($value_count as $k => &$c){
            if($c > 0){
                $result[] = $k;
                $c--;
                $done = false;
            }
        }
    }
    print_r($result);

This results in this:

Array
(
    [0] => blue
    [1] => green
    [2] => red
    [3] => yellow
    [4] => purple
    [5] => blue
    [6] => yellow
    [7] => purple
    [8] => blue
    [9] => purple
    [10] => blue
)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't really work. It works for the example input array, but it doesn't work for a lot of other arrays. Say [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4]. A solution would be [1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 4, 1], but your code returns [1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 1, 1] which is incorrect. –  Paulpro Jun 13 '12 at 3:20
3  
ascii-lime is correct. However, I think if you sort by descending value counts after you compute the counts it should work properly. Basically, start filling the result array with the elements that have the highest count –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:21
    
@mattedgod Yes that should work. You should also keep track of the previous value added and then if the value with the highest count is the same as the previous value use the one with the second highest count instead. If you hit the situation where there is only one unique element left and it's also your previous element then you return false. –  Paulpro Jun 13 '12 at 3:24
    
Also, a side note: I think there will always be a valid solution as long as one element never has more than (n+1)/2 occurrences –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:25
    
@Ascii-lime -- could you show the updated code? I'm actually trying to make it work in an multi dimensional array an array of associative arrays –  Kerry Jun 13 '12 at 3:27

the logical:

print the first value, before print the next, compare it to the previous one, if they are same, jump over the next and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
And if three of them are identical in the end like the above example? –  Kerry Jun 13 '12 at 3:26
    
it will jump to the next value. –  Kleber S. Jun 13 '12 at 3:27
    
What happens with ['a','b','b']? I don't think this works with that –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:28
1  
@KleberS But ['b','a','b'] is a valid solution to that list and your algorithm returns false. The key to this (most likely homework) problem is that you need to sort the elements by the most frequent first. –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:30
1  
@Kerry Haha I was kidding about the hw, if it was someone with no rep asking the question I would have been much more skeptical. Just reminds me of those "fun" algorithm problems from college. That being said, I think the wecsam's answer with the sorting addition is your best bet –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:35

Walk down the array, remember the last value you saw, and throw away the one you're looking at if it matches. Here's an example:

$values = array(
    'blue'
    , 'blue'    
    , 'blue'
    , 'blue'
    , 'green'
    , 'red'
    , 'yellow'
    , 'yellow'
     , 'purple'
    , 'purple'
    , 'purple'
);

$last_seen_value = NULL;
foreach ($values as $i => $value) {
  if (0 == strcmp($value, $last_seen_value)) {
    unset($values[$i]);
  } else {
    $last_seen_value = $value;
  }
}

print_r($values);

# Output:
# 
# Array
# (
#     [0] => blue
#     [4] => green
#     [5] => red
#     [6] => yellow
#     [8] => purple
# )
share|improve this answer
2  
This will just output the unique values. I think what the OP wants is the array "shuffled" so that no two same values are touching. In other words, the output array should be the same size as the input array. –  mattdodge Jun 13 '12 at 3:14
    
This will not output unique values, but I see what you mean. –  sczizzo Jun 13 '12 at 3:15
    
@mattedgod is correct –  Kerry Jun 13 '12 at 3:16

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