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Garbage collection identify the objects that are no longer referred to by any variable and then reclaims the memory occupied by the objects.

I don't whether this process is done in a regular interval or as soon as an objects reference count falling down to zero.

suppose, if GC works immediately whenever an objects reference count falling down to zero then there is no need for requesting GC by calling System.GC();So, what is purpose of this method in this case?

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I think there's a similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3824215/… –  Girish Rao Jun 13 '12 at 4:53
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Under normal circumstances there should never be a need to explicitly request garbage collection by calling System.gc(). –  Axel Jun 13 '12 at 4:59

6 Answers 6

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When you call System.gc(), you say to the garbage collector to make a clean-up. The problem is that it isn't clear when the GC will respond to your request. Even more, it is possible that GC to not run at all when you call it. In java you cannot predict how the GC will work. (That's why is considered bad practice to put your cleanup code in Object's finalize() method). In Java, the out of reference objects are collected for garbage automatically. That's why you don't need to call System.gc(). In special cases, when you want run it if possible, you can try to make use of this method, but the behavior is not guaranteed. (as specified above).

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GC is neither done in a regular interval nor as soon as an objects reference count falling down to zero (Note: that most JVM implementations do not use a reference counting algorithm, so this last point is moot).

When GC will run is decided by The garbage collection algorithm.

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This is decided by The garbage collection algorithm.Even There are methods like System.gc () and Runtime.gc () which is used to send request of Garbage collection to JVM but it’s not guaranteed that garbage collection will happen.

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Most modern JVMs use a "stop-the-world" garbage collector, that is a garbage collector that stops all the application threads in the program, performs the garbage collection, and then resumes the application threads. This means that before doing the garbage collection, all threads in the application should reach a point that is safe to stop the thread.

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An Object becomes eligible for Garbage collection or GC if its not reachable from any live threads or any static refrences in other words you can say that an object becomes eligible for garbage collection if its all references are null. Cyclic dependencies are not counted as reference so if Object A has reference of object B and object B has reference of Object A and they don't have any other live reference then both Objects A and B will be eligible for Garbage collection. Generally an object becomes eligible for garbage collection in Java on following cases:
1) All references of that object explicitly set to null e.g. object = null
2) Object is created inside a block and reference goes out scope once control exit that block.
3) Parent object set to null, if an object holds reference of another object and when you set container object's reference null, child or contained object automatically becomes eligible for garbage collection.
4) If an object has only live references via WeakHashMap it will be eligible for garbage collection.

There are methods like System.gc () and Runtime.gc () which is used to send request of Garbage collection to JVM but it’s not guaranteed that garbage collection will happen.

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There are two answers:

  1. It is not specified by the JVM spec, the JLS or any of the other definitive Java documents when the garbage collector will run. It is therefore implementation specific.

  2. In practice, a couple of different strategies are commonly used. For a non-concurrent collector, the GC is triggered when an attempted allocation fails because there isn't enough unallocated space. For a concurrent collector, a collection is started when the amount of free space falls below a pre-determined threshold. (For HotSpot concurrent GC's, the threshold ratio is a tunable parameter.)

No modern Java GC uses reference counts.

The purpose of the System.gc() is to allow an application to give the JVM a hint that "now would be a good time to run the garbage collector". The JVM is allowed to ignore that hint. As a general rule, triggering the GC that way is inefficient in terms of CPU usage. The only legitimate reason to do it in production code is as a way to avoid GC pauses in a highly interactive application. (You try to force a GC at a point when you know that interactivity is not required; e.g. between "levels" in a game.)

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