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What is the best way to store common application settings in Windows, which are modifiable by all local pc users.

I need to store a file with settings but other users (= local users from the pc, not external users) should also be able to modify these.

You can write items to:

  • the registry
  • c:\TEMP folder (or just another folder)
  • network pipe (too complex)
  • Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData
  • IsolatedStorage (?)
  • etc...

I have been looking at the Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData but other users can only read in this folder and not write.

What is now the recommended/best way to store common application settings modifiable by all local users. (Windows XP should still be supported.)

Does anyone have a full overview of storing and global application settings and their (dis)advantages?

Thanks in advance!

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Best place is a share on a file server that's backed-up at least once a day. –  Hans Passant Jun 13 '12 at 9:03
    
I'm not sure to understand how users can write to the registry/network with writing into a shared file. Do you mean creating a Windows Service that will listen for changes in the file, and will then try to execute some predefined templates from that file? If so - I'm curious how this will handle deletes in the file. –  Tisho Jun 13 '12 at 9:12
1  
@Tisho : It is a Windows application that needs to store application settings. Not user specific settings, but settings for all local users on the pc. By creating a file in the Environment.SpecialFolder.CommonApplicationData all local users can read the settings but only the file creator can modify it. So I was looking for an alternative where all local users also can modify a file instead of only the creator. Hope this makes something clear. HansPassant : it is not about creating backups. –  juFo Jun 13 '12 at 9:29
    
Ahh, makes sense now. How do you create the file? It seems like a write lock problem? What error does the other users get when trying to write in the file? –  Tisho Jun 13 '12 at 9:46
    
You need to change the file permissions after you have created it in CommonApplicationData to allow read/write access for everyone. –  Camford Jun 13 '12 at 9:57
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