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Using Reactive Extensions, I want to ignore messages coming from my event stream that occur while my Subscribe method is running. I.e. it sometimes takes me longer to process a message than the time between message, so I want to drop the messages I don't have time to process.

However, when my Subscribe method completes, if any messages did come through I want to process the last one. So I always process the most recent message.

So, if I have some code which does:

messages.OnNext(100);
messages.OnNext(1);
messages.OnNext(2);

and if we assume the '100' takes a long time to process. Then I want the '2' to be processed when the '100' completes. The '1' should be ignored because it was superseded by the '2' while the '100' was still being processed.

Here's an example of the result I want using a background task and Latest()

var messages = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(100));

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    foreach(var n in messages.Latest())
    {
        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
        Console.WriteLine(n);
    }
});

However, Latest() is a blocking call and I'd prefer not to have a thread sitting waiting for the next value like this (there will sometimes be very long gaps between messages).

I can also get the result I want by using a BroadcastBlock from TPL Dataflow, like this:

var buffer = new BroadcastBlock<long>(n => n);
Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(100)).Subscribe(n => buffer.Post(n));

buffer.AsObservable()
    .Subscribe(n =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
        Console.WriteLine(n);
    });

but this feels like it should be possible directly in Rx. What's the best way to go about doing it?

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Sounds like a job for Window<T>(), although someone might come up with a simpler solution. –  Bryan Anderson Jun 13 '12 at 19:59
    
Your events must be generated independently from the subscription. –  Dave Hillier Jun 13 '12 at 22:09
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7 Answers

Here is a method that is similar to Dave's but uses Sample instead (which is more appropriate than buffer). I've included a similar extension method to the one I added to Dave's answer.

The extension:

public static IDisposable SubscribeWithoutOverlap<T>(this IObservable<T> source, Action<T> action)
{
    var sampler = new Subject<Unit>();

    var sub = source.
        Sample(sampler).
        ObserveOn(Scheduler.ThreadPool).
        Subscribe(l =>
        {
            action(l);
            sampler.OnNext(Unit.Default);
        });

    // start sampling when we have a first value
    source.Take(1).Subscribe(_ => sampler.OnNext(Unit.Default));

    return sub;
}

Note that it's simpler, and there is no 'empty' buffer that's fired. The first element that is sent to the action actually comes from the stream itself.

Usage is straightforward:

messages.SubscribeWithoutOverlap(n =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("start: " + n);
    Thread.Sleep(500);
    Console.WriteLine("end: " + n);
});

messages.Subscribe(x => Console.WriteLine("source: " + x)); // for testing

And results:

source: 0
start: 0
source: 1
source: 2
source: 3
source: 4
source: 5
end: 0
start: 5
source: 6
source: 7
source: 8
source: 9
source: 10
end: 5
start: 10
source: 11
source: 12
source: 13
source: 14
source: 15
end: 10
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2  
This has a problem in that if the source has not put anything in the sample buffer at the point that sampler.OnNext is called then the system goes into a state where it will not generate any more values. I did a variation on this one using Switch instead of sample stackoverflow.com/a/15876519/158285 –  bradgonesurfing Apr 8 '13 at 10:26
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Here is an attempt using "just" Rx. The timer and the subscriber are kept independent by observing on the threadpool and I've used a subject to provide feedback on completing the task.

I don't think this is a simple solution, but I hope it might give you ideas for improvement.

messages.
    Buffer(() => feedback).
    Select(l => l.LastOrDefault()).
    ObserveOn(Scheduler.ThreadPool).
    Subscribe(n =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
        Console.WriteLine(n);
        feedback.OnNext(Unit.Default);
    });

feedback.OnNext(Unit.Default);

There is one slight problem -- the buffer is first closed when it's empty so it generates the default value. You could probably solve it by doing the feedback after the first message.


Here it is as an extension function:

public static IDisposable SubscribeWithoutOverlap<T>(this IObservable<T> source, Action<T> action)
{
    var feedback = new Subject<Unit>();

    var sub = source.
        Buffer(() => feedback).
        ObserveOn(Scheduler.ThreadPool).
        Subscribe(l =>
        {
            action(l.LastOrDefault());
            feedback.OnNext(Unit.Default);
        });

    feedback.OnNext(Unit.Default);

    return sub;
}

And usage:

    messages.SubscribeWithoutOverlap(n =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Console.WriteLine(n);
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Don't you want LastOrDefault instead of FirstOrDefault? –  yamen Jun 14 '12 at 1:10
    
@yamen That is probably sensible –  Dave Hillier Jun 14 '12 at 6:48
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I've written a blog post about this with a solution that uses CAS instead of locks and avoids recursion. The code is below, but you can find a complete explanation here: http://www.zerobugbuild.com/?p=192

public static IObservable<TSource> ObserveLatestOn<TSource>(
    this IObservable<TSource> source,
    IScheduler scheduler)
{
    return Observable.Create<TSource>(observer =>
    {
        Notification<TSource> pendingNotification = null;
        var cancelable = new MultipleAssignmentDisposable();

        var sourceSubscription = source.Materialize()
            .Subscribe(notification =>
            {
                var previousNotification = Interlocked.Exchange(
                    ref pendingNotification, notification);

                if (previousNotification != null) return;

                cancelable.Disposable = scheduler.Schedule(() =>
                    {
                        var notificationToSend = Interlocked.Exchange(
                            ref pendingNotification, null);
                        notificationToSend.Accept(observer);
                    });
            });
            return new CompositeDisposable(sourceSubscription, cancelable);
    });
}
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An example using Observable.Switch. It also handles the case when you complete the task but there is nothing in the queue.

using System.Reactive.Linq;
using System.Reactive.Subjects;
using System.Reactive.Concurrency;
using System.Reactive.Disposables;

namespace System.Reactive
{
    public static class RXX
    {
        public static IDisposable SubscribeWithoutOverlap<T>
        ( this IObservable<T> source
        , Action<T> action
        , IScheduler scheduler = null)
        {
            var sampler = new Subject<Unit>();
            scheduler = scheduler ?? Scheduler.Default;
            var p = source.Publish();
            var connection = p.Connect();

            var subscription = sampler.Select(x=>p.Take(1))
                .Switch()
                .ObserveOn(scheduler)
                .Subscribe(l =>
                {
                    action(l);
                    sampler.OnNext(Unit.Default);
                });

            sampler.OnNext(Unit.Default);

            return new CompositeDisposable(connection, subscription);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've just noticed this has can miss values. I.e. it doesn't always process the most recent value lands in the queue when it's already doing something. e.g. gist.github.com/WilkaH/5403360 only prints "Done 100", not "Done 2" afterwards (the 1 should be dropped because it's superseded) –  Wilka Apr 17 '13 at 10:50
    
It should ignore items that land in the queue when it is currently processing. I'm not sure what you mean. –  bradgonesurfing Apr 17 '13 at 11:32
    
In which case I didn't make it clear in my original question. I always want the newest item to be processed, so if it comes in while something else is processing, then that item should be processed when the current one completes (instead of being missed). –  Wilka Apr 17 '13 at 12:08
    
Should only require a small change to the above code to apply a buffer of one element. Exercise for the reader perhapps? :) –  bradgonesurfing Apr 17 '13 at 13:26
    
I'm clearly being a numpty today, I tried buffer (and a few other things) but I couldn't figure out where I wanted to be buffering to get it to work. –  Wilka Apr 17 '13 at 13:42
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to Lee Campbell (of Intro To Rx fame), I now have a working solution using this extension method:

public static IObservable<T> ObserveLatestOn<T>(this IObservable<T> source, IScheduler scheduler)
{
    return Observable.Create<T>(observer =>
    {
        Notification<T> outsideNotification = null;
        var gate = new object();
        bool active = false;
        var cancelable = new MultipleAssignmentDisposable();
        var disposable = source.Materialize().Subscribe(thisNotification =>
        {
            bool alreadyActive;
            lock (gate)
            {
                alreadyActive = active;
                active = true;
                outsideNotification = thisNotification;
            }

            if (!alreadyActive)
            {
                cancelable.Disposable = scheduler.Schedule(self =>
                {
                    Notification<T> localNotification = null;
                    lock (gate)
                    {
                        localNotification = outsideNotification;
                        outsideNotification = null;
                    }
                    localNotification.Accept(observer);
                    bool hasPendingNotification = false;
                    lock (gate)
                    {
                        hasPendingNotification = active = (outsideNotification != null);
                    }
                    if (hasPendingNotification)
                    {
                        self();
                    }
                });
            }
        });
        return new CompositeDisposable(disposable, cancelable);
    });
}
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With Rx 2.0 RC you can use Chunkify to get an IEnumerable of lists, each containing what was observed since the last MoveNext.

You can then use ToObservable to convert that back to an IObservable and only pay attention to the last entry in each non-empty list.

var messages = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(100));

messages.Chunkify()
        .ToObservable(Scheduler.TaskPool)
        .Where(list => list.Any())
        .Select(list => list.Last())
        .Subscribe(n =>
        {
          Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
          Console.WriteLine(n);
        });
share|improve this answer
2  
This does work, but it leaves a thread spinning to pull stuff from the observable (so one of my CPUs gets maxed out) –  Wilka Apr 17 '13 at 12:18
    
And it's building up a List full of values you're potentially going to ignore. The ObserveLatestOn extension avoids this - no list, no allocation from growing the list, no references keeping the old notifications alive. –  Niall Connaughton May 24 '13 at 5:23
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Here's a Task based implementation, with cancellation semantics, which doesn't use a subject. Calling dispose allows the subscribed action to cancel processing, if so desired.

    public static IDisposable SampleSubscribe<T>(this IObservable<T> observable, Action<T, CancellationToken> action)
    {
        var cancellation = new CancellationDisposable();
        var token = cancellation.Token;
        Task task = null;

        return new CompositeDisposable(
            cancellation,
            observable.Subscribe(value =>
            {
                if (task == null || task.IsCompleted)
                    task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => action(value, token), token);
            })
        );
    }

Here's a simple test:

Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(150))
                      .SampleSubscribe((v, ct) =>
                      {   
                          //cbeck for cancellation, do work
                          for (int i = 0; i < 10 && !ct.IsCancellationRequested; i++)
                              Thread.Sleep(100);

                          Console.WriteLine(v);
                      });

The output:

0
7
14
21
28
35
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