Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm playing around with Entity Framework 4.3, and so I am using the DbContext Generator to create the context and entity classes.

With the default EF 4 code generator template, entity classes implement INotifyPropertyChanged, and also add Changing and Changed partial methods in property setters.

When I use the EF 4.x DbContext generator, as pictured below, the entity classes are much lighter, and do not include any means of tracking property changes.

enter image description here

Here is an example:

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// <auto-generated>
//    This code was generated from a template.
//
//    Manual changes to this file may cause unexpected behavior in your application.
//    Manual changes to this file will be overwritten if the code is regenerated.
// </auto-generated>
//------------------------------------------------------------------------------

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace SomeNamespace
{
    public partial class SomeTable
    {
        public SomeTable()
        {
            this.Children = new HashSet<Child>();
        }

        public long parent_id { get; set; }
        public long id { get; set; }
        public string filename { get; set; }
        public byte[] file_blob { get; set; }

        public virtual Parent Parent { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Child> Children { get; set; }
    }
}

I must be missing an important piece of the puzzle, but my searches have been fruitless. So my question is: how can I have generated types included property change notifications with EF 4.3?

Edit

I fully agree with @derape answer's; but I am curious as to why I would need to change the .tt file when the EF 4 default code generation template already has the hooks. I mean what about when binding to a WPF DependencyProperty'? Without INotifyPropertyChanged, changes done by a command to a bunch of properties in a bunch of objects won't be reflected in the UI. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
You're doing it wrong. DBContext generates lightweight POCOs because you're supposed to use it with a pattern such as MVVM in WPF or MVVMC in ASP.NET MVC. Your view models should handle property change notifications or derive from a base class which does. joshsmithonwpf.wordpress.com/2007/08/29/… –  Locutus Apr 22 '13 at 6:12

5 Answers 5

I recently stumbled upon this problem, i edited my Entity.tt to implement the following changes, a quick patch but works great..

Add the following to the CodeStringGenerator class

public string EntityClassOpening(EntityType entity)
{
    return string.Format(
        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
        "{0} {1}partial class {2}{3} : {4}",
        Accessibility.ForType(entity),
        _code.SpaceAfter(_code.AbstractOption(entity)),
        _code.Escape(entity),
        _code.StringBefore(" : ", _typeMapper.GetTypeName(entity.BaseType)),
        "INotifyPropertyChanged");
}


public string Property(EdmProperty edmProperty)
{
    return string.Format(
        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
        "{0} {1} {2} {{ {3}{6} {4}{5} }}",
        Accessibility.ForProperty(edmProperty),
        _typeMapper.GetTypeName(edmProperty.TypeUsage),
        _code.Escape(edmProperty),
        _code.SpaceAfter(Accessibility.ForGetter(edmProperty)),
        _code.SpaceAfter(Accessibility.ForSetter(edmProperty)),
        "set { _"+_code.Escape(edmProperty).ToLower()+" = value; OnPropertyChanged(\""+_code.Escape(edmProperty)+"\");}",
        "get { return _"+_code.Escape(edmProperty).ToLower()+"; }");

}
public string Private(EdmProperty edmProperty) {
    return string.Format(
        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
        "{0} {1} _{2};",
        "private",
        _typeMapper.GetTypeName(edmProperty.TypeUsage),
        _code.Escape(edmProperty).ToLower());

}

Add the following to the generator

using System.ComponentModel;
<#=codeStringGenerator.EntityClassOpening(entity)#>
{
<#
var propertiesWithDefaultValues = typeMapper.GetPropertiesWithDefaultValues(entity);
var collectionNavigationProperties = typeMapper.GetCollectionNavigationProperties(entity);
var complexProperties = typeMapper.GetComplexProperties(entity);
#>

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
{
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
}

And abit further down

foreach (var edmProperty in simpleProperties)
{
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.Private(edmProperty)#>
    <#=codeStringGenerator.Property(edmProperty)#>
<#
}


foreach(var complexProperty in complexProperties)
{
#>
<#=codeStringGenerator.Private(complexProperty)#>
    <#=codeStringGenerator.Property(complexProperty)#>
<#
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should simply continue using ObjectContext if you bind to data models in your application. The lightweight DBContext classes are for when you use MVVM or MVVMC where your view models implement property changed notifications. –  Locutus Apr 22 '13 at 6:14

I have created a variation on Anders answer with the following differences:

  • Fewer changes to the Entity.tt file
  • Using a base class for the INotifyPropertyChanged implementation (handy for introducing other common functionality)
  • Cleaner code layout in the generated model classes

So my steps are:

Create a base class for your model classes to extend:

public abstract class BaseModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

Update the EntityClassOpening method in the Entity.tt file to the following:

public string EntityClassOpening(EntityType entity)
{
    return string.Format(
        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
        "{0} {1}partial class {2}{3}",
        Accessibility.ForType(entity),
        _code.SpaceAfter(_code.AbstractOption(entity)),
        _code.Escape(entity),
        _code.StringBefore(" : ", string.IsNullOrEmpty(_typeMapper.GetTypeName(entity.BaseType)) ? "BaseModel" : _typeMapper.GetTypeName(entity.BaseType)));
}

Find the line:

<#=Accessibility.ForType(complex)#> partial class <#=code.Escape(complex)#>

and update it to be:

<#=Accessibility.ForType(complex)#> partial class <#=code.Escape(complex)#> : BaseModel

Thanks Manolo!

Update the Property method in the Entity.tt file to the following:

public string Property(EdmProperty edmProperty)
{
    return string.Format(
        CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
        "private {1} {3};\r\n"+
        "\t{0} {1} {2} \r\n" +
        "\t{{ \r\n" +
            "\t\t{4}get {{ return {3}; }} \r\n" +
            "\t\t{5}set\r\n" + 
            "\t\t{{\r\n" + 
                "\t\t\tif (value != {3}) {{\r\n" + 
                    "\t\t\t\t{3} = value;\r\n" + 
                    "\t\t\t\t OnPropertyChanged(\"{2}\");\r\n" +
                "\t\t\t}}\r\n" + 
            "\t\t}} \r\n" + 
        "\t}}\r\n",
        Accessibility.ForProperty(edmProperty),
        _typeMapper.GetTypeName(edmProperty.TypeUsage),
        _code.Escape(edmProperty),
        "_" + Char.ToLowerInvariant(_code.Escape(edmProperty)[0]) + _code.Escape(edmProperty).Substring(1),
        _code.SpaceAfter(Accessibility.ForGetter(edmProperty)),
        _code.SpaceAfter(Accessibility.ForSetter(edmProperty)));
}

You're done! Now your model classes will look like:

public partial class User : BaseModel
{
    private int _id;
    public int Id 
    { 
        get { return _id; } 
        set
        {
            if (value != _id) {
                _id = value;
                 OnPropertyChanged("Id");
            }
        } 
    }

    private string _name;
    public string Name 
    { 
        get { return _name; } 
        set
        {
            if (value != _name) {
                _name = value;
                 OnPropertyChanged("Name");
            }
        } 
    }

Please feel free to edit this solution if you can see other improvements.

share|improve this answer
2  
you also have to find the following line: <#=Accessibility.ForType(complex)#> partial class <#=code.Escape(complex)#> and add : BaseModel –  Manolo Dec 4 '13 at 16:32
    
WOW! Worked liked a magic... Thank a Ton!! –  Ankit Goel Aug 6 at 9:16
    
exactly what I need, works with EF 6 –  sgissinger Oct 17 at 16:32

The solution from Anders above works, however there are a couple of gotchas I found during the process:

In Step 1 where it says "Add the following to the CodeStringGenerator class", only the "public string Private(..." function can be added because the other two already exist. So, you need to find them and replace those two functions not add them, otherwise you'll get errors. To find exactly where you need to put them, do a search for "public class CodeStringGenerator", and look for the functions underneath that.

In step 2 "Add the following to the generator", you only need to add the "using System.ComponentModel" line, and the lines from (and including) "public event PropertyChangedEventHandler...". Again, the other lines already exist, you will find them near the top of the .tt file.

In step 3 "And a bit further down", both of those "foreach" loops also already exist, so they must be replaced and not added. Ultimately only one line is added to each foreach loop, "<#=codeStringGenerator.Private(edmProperty)#>" and "<#=codeStringGenerator.Private(complexProperty)#>" in each loop respectively.

Also, don't replace the wrong loop, there are two additional loops above the ones you need to replace which both cycle through the same objects... make sure you replace the correct ones :-)

I thought I would mention this because as an MVVM / EF novice (used to use NHibernate) I had to make these adjustments for it to work.

share|improve this answer

Well it depends what you are trying to do. If you just want to implement custom properties/methods you could use the funcionality of partial classes. If you want to change lets say setter/getter of your properties in your entity designer you'd have to adapt the dbContext generator template file. It's a T4 template.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't really understand your Edit. Can you maybe rephrase your explanation? –  derape Jun 14 '12 at 6:41
    
Also, a word of caution with INotifyPropertyChanged inside of Entities. If you raise the propetychanged event at the wrong time, you will get an EntityMemberChanged or EntityComplexMemberChanged was called without first calling EntityMemberChanging or EntityComplexMemberChanging. Something to do with proxies I think. I haven't found a better way to NotifyPropertyChanged, but it would be great if you could implement INotifyPropertyChanged on the entity itself without having to worry about EF doing something that will crash your program. –  William Apr 9 '13 at 21:52
    
I'm using EF 4.4 if it helps (at least, that's the version on the assembly being referenced), so it's possible that this was fixed with EF 5. –  William Apr 9 '13 at 21:54

You should continue using ObjectContext if you want property change notifications when you bind directly to the data model classes.

The lightweight DBContext classes are for patterns such as MVVM or MVVMC where your view model implements property change notifications and your UI only binds to the view model's properties. You never bind to data model classes in these patterns.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.