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I have a design issue

I need to create method, doSomething, when doSomething is called to case A its signature is different than when it is called to case B.

doSomething(param1, param2) When called from A
doSomething(param3, param4) When called from B

initially I wanted to create an interface and implement it in case A and in case B

(ps. i actually need several such methods with same issue

doSomething1(T) When called from A
doSomething1(X) When called from B

doSomething2(E) When called from A
doSomething2(N) When called from B

etc...)

Can you please suggest a preferred design?


Edit: changed question hope it is clearer

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What is a "case" in this? Is it a class? Is there a relation between the parameter types? This question is very hard to understand. –  ftr Jun 13 '12 at 8:22
2  
I'm not clear about your notation. Are A, B, etc. class names? Is A in the parameter list the same A as in "From A"? What's the design problem? –  Ted Hopp Jun 13 '12 at 8:22
2  
Can't you simply use overloading? –  adarshr Jun 13 '12 at 8:22
    
if the signatures differ but not the name of the functions thats overloading, if you want the same function to handle multiple similar types then you need polymorphism ... so logic within functions or within objects of similar types, I usually prefer the latter but thats a case by case problem, we need to understand the relationship between all the different parameters, you've stated. –  Samy Vilar Jun 13 '12 at 8:33
    
Can you tell us what types do these parameters belong to instead of just A, B, C or param1, param2 etc? It's really hard to understand your question if you don't give out the full information. –  adarshr Jun 13 '12 at 8:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use Java Generics with Strategy Design Pattern to overcome this issue:

lets assume you have two "cases" Case1 and Case2, and you we'll call the classes that have the doSomething() method for each case "Handlers".

First we'll have an interface that defines the Handlers:

public interface Handler<TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3>{

    void doSomething(TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3);

    void doSomethingElse(TYPE3);

}

your handlers would be as follows:

public class Case1Handler implements Handler<Case1Type1, Case1Type2, Case1Type3>{

    public void doSomething(Case1Type1 t1, Case1Type2 t2, Case1Type3 t3){
        // do case 1 business
    }

    public void doSomethingElse(Case1Type3 t3){
        // do case 1 business
    }

}

and you'll have a similar implementation for Case2.

now, you are still coding the same business of doSomething() and doSomethingElse() twice, Strategy Pattern would help you here.

basically, you have the same business performed on different types of objects. You can move these differences to another class (The Strategy) and inject this strategy to the one implementation of Handler.

public class HandlerImpl<TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3> implements Handler<TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3>{

    private Strategy<TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3> strategy;

    public HandlerImpl(Strategy<TYPE1, TYPE2, TYPE3> strategy){
        this.strategy = strategy;
    }

    public void doSomething(TYPE1 t1, TYPE2 t2, TYPE3 t3){
        // do your business using "strategy"
    }

    public void doSomethingElse(TYPE3 t3){
        // do your business using "strategy"
    }

}

this might seems overkill, but it is absolutely not. This makes your code cleaner, changes (adding new case, changing the business) would be easier to implement :)

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So, you have a method that processes a certain type of data, but the data looks a bit different when called from a class or another.

If that's not correct and your data is completely different and unrelated, you might really want to do several methods.

If the data is similar, I'd recommend creating an object that contains the data like so:

public class MyData {
    public MyData(A, B, C){ /* Do your thing */ }
    public MyData(D, E, F){ /* Do your other thing */ }

And then have the interface you are trying to implement take a MyData object as parameter

doSomething(MyData data);

That's what I'd probably do with what you've explained, but feel free to gives us feedback if that doesn't work!

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doSomething1(T) When called from A
doSomething1(X) When called from B

If doSomething() does same things in both these methods then you can implement method as doSometing(S) where S is interface implemented by both T and X.

If T and X are quite dissimilar then you might want to have separate classes DoerT and DoerX that provide doSomething(T) and doSomething(X) respectively.

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