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I'm searching for design patter that could implement some prolog code and then epilog code. Let me explain:

I have an function (a lot of them) that amost do the same thing:

this is presudo code but actually it's written in C# 4.5

public IDatabaseError GetUserByName(string Name)
{
  try
  {
      //Initialize session to database
  }
  catch (Exception)
  {
     // return error with description for this step
  }

  try
  {
       // Try to create 'transaction' object
  }
  catch(Exception)
  {
     // return error with description about this step
  }

  try
  {       
      // Execute call to database with session and transaction object
      //
      // Actually in all function only this section of the code is different
      //
  }
  catch(Exception)
  {
      // Transaction object rollback
      // Return error with description for this step
  }
  finally
  {
      // Close session to database
  }

   return everything-is-ok  
}

So - as you can see 'prolog' (Create session, transaction, other helper function) and 'epilog' (close session, rollback transaction, clean memeory, etc..) is the same for all functions.

Some restrictions:

  • I want to keep session and transaction object creation/destruction process in function and not in ctor
  • Custom code (that running in the middle) must be wrapped in try/catch and return different error for different situation
  • I'm open for any Func<>, Action<> preferable Task<> functions suggestions

    Any ideas for design patter or code refactoring ?

share|improve this question
3  
BTW I don't think returning an error instead of throwing an exception is a nice idea. –  Felice Pollano Jun 13 '12 at 8:51
    
Take a look at the Decorator pattern –  Jordão Jun 14 '12 at 1:57
    
Jasper: Returning anything in case of exception is an antidesign pattern and you shouldn't do it at all! –  dzendras Jun 15 '12 at 5:48

2 Answers 2

This can be achieved by using IDisposable objects as for example:

using(var uow = new UnitOfWork() )
using(var t = new TransactionScope() )
{
   //query the database and throws exceptions
   // in case of errors
}

Please nothe the TransactionScope class is an out-of-the box class you have in System.Transaction that works ( not only ) with DB connections. In the UnitOfWork constructor do the "Prologue" code ( ie open the connection... ), in the Dispose do the epilogue part. By throwing exception when error occours you are sure the epilogue part is called anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
So - let's say exception happens in UnitOfWork() class - how I gonna return 'IDatabaseError' object ? In 'using' statements you using constructor of the object that does not return any state-object, only construct/initialize it.... –  Jasper Jun 13 '12 at 9:07
    
@Jasper as I said I don't think is a good idea returning something in case of exception. But if you can't change, wrap the code with a try/catch and return the error in the catch part. –  Felice Pollano Jun 13 '12 at 9:10
    
Felice Pollano: I understand. So any ideas for pattern that doesn't throw Exception ? –  Jasper Jun 13 '12 at 9:13
    
+1: Was going to suggest the same thing. Creating a custom IDisposable class or struct is a great way to execute before/after code in a block, and guarantee execution always. I've used this in many high performance systems to provide nested suspend/resume around a block of code –  Dr. ABT Jun 13 '12 at 9:28
    
Whoever +1 this answer - what about my question in the first comment ? Any answer for this ? if you think that @FelicePollano answer is correct. –  Jasper Jun 13 '12 at 12:58

It sounds like you're looking for the Template Method Pattern.

The template method pattern will allow you to reduce the amount of duplicated code in similar methods by extracting out only the parts of the method which are different.

For this particular example, you could write a method that does all the grunt work, and then invokes a callback to do the interesting work...

// THIS PART ONLY WRITTEN ONCE
public class Database
{
    // This is the template method - it only needs to be written once, so the prolog and epilog only exist in this method...
    public static IDatabaseError ExecuteQuery(Action<ISession> queryCallback)
    {

        try
        {
            //Initialize session to database
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // return error with description for this step
        }

        try
        {
            // Try to create 'transaction' object
        }
        catch(Exception)
        {
            // return error with description about this step
        }

        try
        {       
            // Execute call to database with session and transaction object
            //
            // Actually in all function only this section of the code is different
            //
            var session = the session which was set up at the start of this method...

            queryCallback(session);
        }
        catch(Exception)
        {
            // Transaction object rollback
            // Return error with description for this step
        }
        finally
        {
            // Close session to database
        }

        return everything-is-ok
    }
}

This is the usage:

// THIS PART WRITTEN MANY TIMES
IDatabaseError error = Database.ExecuteQuery(session =>
{
    // do your unique thing with the database here - no need to write the prolog / epilog...

    // you can use the session variable - it was set up by the template method...

    // you can throw an exception, it will be converted to IDatabaseError by the template method...
});

if (error != null)
    // something bad happened!

I hope I have explained better this time :)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, thats not true. Template method pattern gives you variability, not "less code" - the latter is a nice side effect at best. –  Filip Jun 13 '12 at 9:32
    
You're correct it's not the main purpose of the pattern however I still think it's appropriate in this case. –  MattDavey Jun 13 '12 at 9:34
    
That's true. Simpler than AOP, too. +1 –  Filip Jun 13 '12 at 10:26
    
I don't know who give this answer +1 -> this is not what I'm looking for. @MattDavey just separate some code from big gigantic function - I'm not seeing big (!) difference from my code. This is not what I'm looking for. Still - the prolog and epilog code is not generic for any function - it just some of the code will run in 'GetUserByNameImpl' function. –  Jasper Jun 13 '12 at 12:53
2  
@Jasper please review stackoverflow.com/privileges/vote-down. All of the answers you have down voted here are solid methods to solve your problem and none of them fall in categories outlined there. Further complicating the matter is that what you think you need seems to be different than what you actually need. –  Yaur Jun 14 '12 at 7:54

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