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I want to create long-running application for performing various tasks on different threads. Each task should have one-minute timeout. Here is my implementation:

runner = new Thread(new Runnable() { 
   @Override
   public void run() {  }
       // some actions here
});
runner.start();
startJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();            
runner.join(TIMEOUT);    
stopJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();

if ((stopJoin - startJoin) >= TIMEOUT)
            throw new TimeoutException("Timeout when reading the response from   process");

In general case it is working and throwing TimeoutExceptions, but sometimes it is doing nothing after even few hours. So the questions is if Thread.join is reliable on Android?

I have an idea to use Thread.wait and notify instead of that, what is the better way in your opinion?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried services? –  pawelzieba Jun 13 '12 at 9:11
1  
it is doing nothing after even few hours. explain this? is the thread running still or has it ended? –  alegen Jun 13 '12 at 9:17
    
"main" thread is running and waiting on join. –  Paweł Jun 13 '12 at 9:25

2 Answers 2

I prefer doing all time base task using Timer and TimerTask. Check the following code and probably this should be useful to you:

Timer t =new Timer();
    t.schedule(new TimerTask() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            //The task you want to perform after the timeout period 
        }
    }, TIMEOUT);

EDIT

I am giving a try at solving your problem. I am using the code written by @amicngh as my base code and have done some modifications to it. I presume that after the TIMEOUT period you want to close the running thread. Check the following code runs fine and the explanation that follows:

public class ThreadTest {
public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    final long TIMEOUT=100;
    final long startJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();

    Thread runner = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        long stopJoin;
           @Override
           public void run() {
               try{
                   for(;;){
                       System.out.println("running "); 
                       stopJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();

                       if ((stopJoin - startJoin) >= TIMEOUT){
                         throw new Exception();  
                       }
                   }
               }
               catch (Exception e) {
                // TODO: handle exception
               }

           }
               // some actions here
        });

    runner.start();

    synchronized (ThreadTest.class) {
        ThreadTest.class.wait(TIMEOUT);
    }


    /*if ((stopJoin - startJoin) >= TIMEOUT)
        try {
            throw new Exception("Timeout when reading the response from   process");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }*/


        System.out.println("Running Thread");

}

}

The Thread API description says that it is unsafe to destroy or stop (hence both these method has been deprecated) and one of the way to stop a thread is to throw an exception. Hence I am checking for the Timeout inside the runner thread. Now about making the Main thread wait it is done by the 2 lines of code which uses synchronized to synchronize the access to the thread.

Hope this code and explanation solves your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I am familiar with Timer and TimerTask, but in this case I want to block the main thread, until operations from runner thread will be finished. I do not want to create additional thread here, because application already use a lot of them. –  Paweł Jun 13 '12 at 9:28
    
When you say block the main thread I assume you want to block the UI thread, which I don't think is a good idea(it may throw exceptions). Why don't you try using AsyncTask and show a progress dialog while you are fetching your data. –  Arun George Jun 13 '12 at 10:00
    
I don't want to block UI thread. I do not have UI at all in this application. From the service I spawn few threads for each task (I previously called it main thread. I want to do not end them until their children threads are still working. –  Paweł Jun 13 '12 at 10:04
    
@Paweł did you get a chance to look at the edited code? If yes, was your issue resolved? –  Arun George Jun 13 '12 at 18:03
    
thanks you for the code. Now I am testing on several devices implementation with TimerTask. It works fine for about 25 hours. If it will crash, I will introduce your solution and give you a feedback. –  Paweł Jun 14 '12 at 14:00

Refer below program.

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    long TIMEOUT=100;
    Thread runner = new Thread(new Runnable() {
           @Override
           public void run() {

               for(;;){
                   System.out.println("running ");
               }

           }
               // some actions here
        });

    runner.start();
    long startJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();
    runner.join(TIMEOUT);
    long stopJoin = System.currentTimeMillis();

    if ((stopJoin - startJoin) >= TIMEOUT)
        try {
            throw new Exception("Timeout when reading the response from   process");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }


        System.out.println("Running Thread");

}

This program never ends that means your logic is incorrect.

Better to use TimerTask.

share|improve this answer
    
So maybe explain me where my logic is incorrect? If join method is working fine, this program should end. I explained why I do not want to use TimerTask in comment to the answer above. –  Paweł Jun 13 '12 at 9:39
    
The exception is thrown, so why is it incorrect? The process doesn't end, because there's still a thread running.. –  Ishtar Jun 13 '12 at 9:43

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