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Hi i want to match a number which is less than or equal to 100 ,i t can be anything within 0-100 ,but the regex should not match for a number which is greater than 100 like 120 130,150 ,999...etc..

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1  
How about 0.5 or 1e2? Should those match? What about 0000001? –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 13 '12 at 9:23
5  
Why do you want to use a regex for this? Perl already has perfectly serviceable Boolean comparison operators (<, <=, ==, >, >=). –  Dave Cross Jun 13 '12 at 9:32
    
As Dave says, are you sure you want a regular expression? Perl will treat a variable as a string or a number interchangably, and you could write if ($num >= 0 and $num <= 100) { ... } –  Borodin Jun 13 '12 at 10:43
    
@Borodin - BTW, you can also place your condition if($n>=0 && $n<=100) within a regex - by using a code assertion ;-) –  rubber boots Jun 13 '12 at 13:43

5 Answers 5

Try this

\b(0*(?:[1-9][0-9]?|100))\b

Explanation

"
\b                # Assert position at a word boundary
(                 # Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1
   0                 # Match the character “0” literally
      *                 # Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
   (?:               # Match the regular expression below
                        # Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails)
         [1-9]             # Match a single character in the range between “1” and “9”
         [0-9]             # Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9”
            ?                 # Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
      |                 # Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match)
         100               # Match the characters “100” literally
   )
)
\b                # Assert position at a word boundary
"

Visit here for future problems.

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1  
+1 for the explanation –  Dave Jun 13 '12 at 9:59

How about this for the regex:

^([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|100)$

this would validate 7, 82, 100 for examples, but would not validate 07 or 082.

Check this out for more information (and variations including zero prefixing) on number range checking


If you need to cater for floating point numbers you should read this, here is an expression you can use:

Floating point: ^[-+]?([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|100)*\.?[0-9]+$

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Use Code Assertions if you need a regex (eventually):

 /^(.+)$(??{$^N>=0 && $^N<=100 ? '':'^'})/

Test:

my @nums = (-1, 0, 10, 22, 1e10, 1e-10, 99, 101, 1.001e2);

print join ',', grep 
                /^(.+)$(??{$^N>=0 && $^N<=100 ? '':'^'})/,
                @nums

Result:

 0,10,22,1e-010,99

(==> Here is sth. to learn about code assertions).

rbo

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regex for this

        perl -le 'for (qw/0 1 19 32.4 100 77 138 342.1/) { print "$_ is ", /^(?:100|\d\d?)$/ ? "valid input" : "invalid input"}'
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This regEx matches the numbers 0-100 diapason and disallow numbers like 001:

\b(0|[1-9][0-9]?|100)\b
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protected by tchrist Sep 3 '12 at 14:19

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