Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the following code, the exceptions are thrown in two cases as shown in the main ().

#include <iostream>

// Our own exception classes - just for fun.
class myExceptionClassA 
{
    public:
    myExceptionClassA () {std::cout << "\nWarning: Division by zero isn't allowed.\n";}
};

class myExceptionClassB
{
    public:
    myExceptionClassB () {std::cout << "\nWarning: Division by dividend isn't allowed.\n";}
};

class divisionClass
{
    private:
    int *result;

    public:
    divisionClass () 
    {
        // Allocating memory to the private variable.
        result = new int;
    }

    /* 
        The class function `doDivide`:
        1. Throws above defined exceptions on the specified cases.
        2. Returns the division result.
    */
    int doDivide (int toBeDividedBy) throw (myExceptionClassA, myExceptionClassB)
    {
        *result       = 200000;

        // If the divisor is 0, then throw an exception.
        if (toBeDividedBy == 0)
        {
            throw myExceptionClassA ();
        }
        // If the divisor is same as dividend, then throw an exception.
        else if (toBeDividedBy == *result)
        {
            throw myExceptionClassB ();
        }

        // The following code won't get executed if/when an exception is thrown.
        std :: cout <<"\nException wasn't thrown. :)";

        *result = *result / toBeDividedBy;
        return *result;
    }

    ~divisionClass () 
    {
        std::cout << "\ndddddddddd\n";
        delete result;
    }
};

int main ()
{
    divisionClass obj;
    try
    {
        obj.doDivide (200000);
    }
    catch (myExceptionClassA) {}
    catch (myExceptionClassB) {}

    try
    {
        obj.doDivide (3);
    }
    catch (myExceptionClassA) {}
    catch (myExceptionClassB) {}

    try
    {
        obj.doDivide (0);
    }
    catch (myExceptionClassA) {}
    catch (myExceptionClassB) {}

    try
    {
        obj.doDivide (4);
    }
    catch (myExceptionClassA) {}
    catch (myExceptionClassB) {}

    return 0;
}

- The both exception class print statements get printed.
- The statement in the destructor gets printed only once.
- Valgrind doesn't show any memory leaks.

anisha@linux-y3pi:~/Desktop> g++ exceptionSafe3.cpp -Wall
anisha@linux-y3pi:~/Desktop> valgrind ./a.out 
==18838== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==18838== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==18838== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==18838== Command: ./a.out
==18838== 

Warning: Division by dividend isn't allowed.

Exception wasn't thrown. :)
Warning: Division by zero isn't allowed.

Exception wasn't thrown. :)
dddddddddd
==18838== 
==18838== HEAP SUMMARY:
==18838==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==18838==   total heap usage: 3 allocs, 3 frees, 262 bytes allocated
==18838== 
==18838== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==18838== 
==18838== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==18838== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)
anisha@linux-y3pi:~/Desktop> 

Shouldn't the destructor get called 3 times - two times for exceptions and one time for return statement?

Please explain the point that I am missing.


Now I tried it by removing all the try catch blocks in the main().
Destructor doesn't get called at all?

anisha@linux-y3pi:~/Desktop> valgrind ./a.out 
==18994== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==18994== Copyright (C) 2002-2009, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==18994== Using Valgrind-3.5.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==18994== Command: ./a.out
==18994== 

Warning: Division by dividend isn't allowed.
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'myExceptionClassB'
==18994== 
==18994== HEAP SUMMARY:
==18994==     in use at exit: 133 bytes in 2 blocks
==18994==   total heap usage: 3 allocs, 1 frees, 165 bytes allocated
==18994== 
==18994== LEAK SUMMARY:
==18994==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==18994==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==18994==      possibly lost: 129 bytes in 1 blocks
==18994==    still reachable: 4 bytes in 1 blocks
==18994==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==18994== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==18994== 
==18994== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==18994== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)
Aborted
anisha@linux-y3pi:~/Desktop>
share|improve this question
1  
When a exception is thrown,stack unwinding calls destructors for all the objects created within that scope({,}) It does not destroy objects that is owned. –  Alok Save Jun 13 '12 at 9:42
    
If an exception is thrown and never caught then it is implementation defined as to whether stack unwinds or abort() gets called first, it seems your implementation doesn't unwind the stack and it is allowed as per the standard. –  Alok Save Jun 13 '12 at 9:44
    
why do you think the destructor should be called? when throwing an exception, only objects out of whose scope the exceptions is thrown will be destructed. In your case, there are no objects defined only inside the body of divisionClass::doDivide(). –  Walter Jun 13 '12 at 9:46
    
@Walter why do you think the destructor should be called? Actually, I was studying RAII which says that if you put the methods in a class and destructor will take care of memory freeing with throws happen (w.r.t exception safe code). –  TheIndependentAquarius Jun 13 '12 at 10:13
1  
@AnishaKaul: This similar Q here might help you understand better. –  Alok Save Jun 13 '12 at 10:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you catch an exception, the stack is "unwound" between the point where the exception was thrown, and the point where it is caught. This means that all automatic variables in the scopes between those two points are destroyed -- everything inside the try that corresponds to whatever catch matches the exception.

Your object obj is an automatic variable in the main function, outside the try. Hence, it is not destroyed when the stack is unwound. Your code relies on that fact -- after the first catch you call doDivide on it again, so it better not have been destroyed.

If you don't catch the exception at all, then it is implementation-defined whether or not the stack is unwound (15.3/9 in C++11) before the program is terminated. It looks as though in your second test, without any catch clauses, it is not.

This means that if you want your RAII objects to "work", then you can't allow uncaught exceptions in your program. You could do something like:

int main() {
    try {
        do_all_the_work();
    } catch (...) {
        throw; // or just exit
    }
}

Now you're guaranteed that any automatic variables in do_all_the_work will be destroyed if an exception escapes the function. The downside is that you might get less info out of your debugger, because it has forgotten the original throw site of the uncaught exception.

Of course, it's still possible for code in your program to prevent your obj from being destroyed, for example by calling abort().

share|improve this answer
    
very helpful answer, thanks. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jun 13 '12 at 10:58

The message is printed in the destructor of divisionClass. You only have one object of that type, that gets destroyed at the end of main.

share|improve this answer
    
so, it means that when the exception is thrown, the destructor isn't called? –  TheIndependentAquarius Jun 13 '12 at 9:30
    
@AnishaKaul if you catch it, no. If you let it propagate (assume you did this in another method called from main, and catch the exception in main), then yes, but that's because the object scope ended. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 13 '12 at 9:31
    
@AnishaKaul: Stack unwinding destructs objects(and hence calls destructors) created within that scope in which exception was thrown. –  Alok Save Jun 13 '12 at 9:31
    
Luchain, ` If you let it propagate` what does this mean? I'll see what happens if I don't catch the exception. –  TheIndependentAquarius Jun 13 '12 at 9:33
1  
@AnishaKaul that is true, but it's not the exception that frees the memory. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 13 '12 at 10:52

Throwing an exception from a method does not destroy the object that owns it. Only when it is deleted, or goes out of scope (in this case, at the end of main()) will it be destroyed and the destructor called.

share|improve this answer

Stack unwinding is guaranteed to happen when there's a matching catch handler somewhere up the call stack from the point the exception was thrown. You can simplify and visualize your stack like this:

+-------------------+
| locals            | obj.doDivide()
+-------------------+
|                   | try {}
+-------------------+
| catch { }         |
|                   | main()
| DivisionClass obj |
+-------------------+

Only the part of the stack that's under (in the pic it's above) gets unwound and the corresponding objects are destroyed. The part of the stack with your divisonClass object stays intact until main() exits.

Try this code and see the difference:

void foo()
{
    divisionClass obj;
    obj.doDivide(0);
}

int main()
{
    try {
        foo();
    }
    catch (myExceptionClassA) {
        std::cout << "Check point.\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.